or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Are powder skis really necessary?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Are powder skis really necessary?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

 Re the many threads on which ski in the East, 2 ski quiver, etc, and my threads on ski size, shovel width.  Again I ski NY and lower VT  and  do 95% groomed runs, yet want something also for up for crud, etc. By the opinions of many posting here, I know I would only need something like the RTM84(maybe 80), yet will try the Crimson TI also. Then if I decide on upper VT, NY off piste, go wider.  Yet many years ago, most skis were no where near the size of today's skis, well under 80 waist. And people made do in powder.  SO, can I get away with 80/84 waist(even thinner), in powder with proper technique? And I am not talking waist deep west powder, but maybe 18" - 24", if I can even find that here in the East?  If that is the case, why even spend the money on 2 sets of skis?

post #2 of 12

You can also drive to work in winter in a '68 Beattle. The question is 'why' when newer tools make it more enjoyable, and arguably even 'possible' for the unwashed masses. And yes, I've skied in 3' of new snow in 210 GS skis back in the day. IMHO, if the RTM 84 does it for you if you're skiing groomers 95% of the time (why so wide for groomers? :)), it's indeed a pretty nice ski in 6-8" of fresh snow as well. Buy your one pair and have at it. 

post #3 of 12
Skiing isn't necessary, but it sure is fun! That's about how I feel about pow skis in pow.
post #4 of 12

Not at all necessary but more fun.

post #5 of 12

One thing the wider skis do is make 6" of fresh feel "bottomless", so you get more 'bottomless powder days'.

post #6 of 12

Skiing powder on skinny skis is way harder mentally and physically than on fat rockers.  Dealer's choice, ski what you want.

post #7 of 12

Compare this video of powder skiing from 1974 to this newer video.

 

Obviously people skied powder, and skied it well, before the advent of wide rockered skis. In the older video, the skis and boots spent a lot of time underneath the snow, mostly because of the smaller platform of the skis.  In the newer video, the tips are almost always above the snow.

post #8 of 12
Is a screwdriver necessary when you have a hammer to drive a screw into a wall? Like you said, there was a time when an 78mm ski was a mind blowing powder ski as the Snow Ranger. Before that was the Miller Soft. Will an 84 waisted RTM84 work? Sure, RTM stands for Ride The Mountain, and anyone at Volkl would tell you that would include some powder usage. The RtM84 being a reverse camber 84 would be one of he the better skis in that range to do what you are asking it to do. I will say a proper tool, ie powder ski will give you another 2-3 (minimum) runs a day of skiing powder and you will need to justify what that is worth in cost/ benefit.
post #9 of 12
When I bought my first 78 mm skis, they were my powder skis compared to my Rossi Vipers (back when you only worried about length). Two, three years, bought my Outlaws for powder, they were 88. Was still using the 78's and basically replaced them twice with more 78's. Last year went to 98's for powder. Thought about wider, but don't have the need here, it's not Baker. Each new width has opened more terrain to me. Of course, width isn't the sole change going on, there's stiffness changes and rocker changes, but there's also fun changes.
post #10 of 12
If you want to surf powder, then yes, they are necessary. Question is, do you need to buy a pair? If your access to decent powder is minimal, then a post storm rental might be a better option.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alohaed View Post
 

 Re the many threads on which ski in the East, 2 ski quiver, etc, and my threads on ski size, shovel width.  Again I ski NY and lower VT  and  do 95% groomed runs, yet want something also for up for crud, etc. By the opinions of many posting here, I know I would only need something like the RTM84(maybe 80), yet will try the Crimson TI also. Then if I decide on upper VT, NY off piste, go wider.  Yet many years ago, most skis were no where near the size of today's skis, well under 80 waist. And people made do in powder.  SO, can I get away with 80/84 waist(even thinner), in powder with proper technique? And I am not talking waist deep west powder, but maybe 18" - 24", if I can even find that here in the East?  If that is the case, why even spend the money on 2 sets of skis?

 

You do not need dedicated powder skis.

post #12 of 12
Powderskis will make skiing powder that much more easy. After you get more miles in powder you will be able to ski non-Powderskis in powder more easily too. But Powderskis will be much more fun in powder. And skis for groomers will be more fun on groomers (although I have to say my DPS Wailers are awesome on the groomers too biggrin.gif)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Are powder skis really necessary?