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Moved out West...

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Kinda.  :)  I moved to Phoenix from the east coast, but I will be taking 2-3 trips to ski this year, should get 12 days in total.  I will taking trips to Southwest CO, Taos, and someplace else TBD.  Should see at least 12 days on the snow.

 

 

So my quiver:

iM78's in 177

Fischer World Cup GS's from ~05 with a 21mm cut in 188's

Technica Agent 120's

 

These served me well out East, but I dont know about out West.  I have only skied out here once, and it was ~15 years ago as a teenager.  The Technica boots are actually their lower level race boot rebadged IIRC, and I think they ski every bit a 120 if not stiffer.  The im78's dont float very well at all, but were definetely a fun all around ski back east.  The GS ski's will be staying in the quiver regardless, as I love them and if I can find any long, icy runs out here they will be brought out and a lot of fun will be had. :D

 

 

 

So can you guys give me some recommendations as where I should be going from here?  I am 6'3, ~180 and a very competent skier, I have been skiing my whole life... but I have never competed or anything.  And as I said, I dont have any real experience out West.

 

Any help is appreciated.  The only thing I will note is I will look for some used skiis (and maybe boots depending on the recommendations), so any recommendations revolving around 2014 gear will fall on deaf ears.  

 

 

Thanks!


Edited by skier2369 - 11/6/13 at 6:02pm
post #2 of 29

Its only an hour flight to SLC. 

post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 

Yep... I know.  

 

 

 

So what about the gear?

post #4 of 29

Get something in the 100-110 range that you could take out west and would perform well regardless of the conditions. You could look at the Volkl Gotama, K2 Annex 108, Rossi Soul 7, Salomon Quest 105, Blizzard Cochise. There are lots of options, but it would help if you us a little insight into what you look for in a ski. Have you skied any wider skis before? If so which and what did you think.

post #5 of 29
So, you want to know whether your skinny Eastern skis are adequate? You'll be happier with a wider ski, even if you plan to stay on groomers. Because lots of times runs groomed last night have seven inches of snow on them.

Beyond that statement, we need to know what resorts and terrain you are contemplating, what level skier you are (5, 6, 7?), etc. "Competent" doesn't tell us a thing. Neither does number of years skiing. (I've got 1314 days, but am only about a 7.5.) Where are you used to skiing, what runs?
post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk94 View Post
 

Get something in the 100-110 range that you could take out west and would perform well regardless of the conditions. You could look at the Volkl Gotama, K2 Annex 108, Rossi Soul 7, Salomon Quest 105, Blizzard Cochise. There are lots of options, but it would help if you us a little insight into what you look for in a ski. Have you skied any wider skis before? If so which and what did you think.

Skier 2369

 

You're going to love skiing out west.  I'm originally New England where I did a lot of skiing and for me the west is the place to be.

Skis:  Hang on to your Fishers, as long as they are in decent shape, they sound like great cruisers.  For new skis, try to demo some such as tsk94 suggests.

Boots:  Your boots will be fine as long as they work for you.  I have always thought once you have a boot that works, don't even DREAM of something else until the boots are worn out and can't be skied on anymore.

 

Have A Ball

post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 

General tips help guys.  I can use this thread to do more research and then get an idea after I get on the mountain, but I am flying sorta blind here.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by tsk94 View Post
 

Get something in the 100-110 range that you could take out west and would perform well regardless of the conditions. You could look at the Volkl Gotama, K2 Annex 108, Rossi Soul 7, Salomon Quest 105, Blizzard Cochise. There are lots of options, but it would help if you us a little insight into what you look for in a ski. Have you skied any wider skis before? If so which and what did you think.

 

I have never skied a wider ski.  Out east I ski fast, metal skiis, as you can see from my description.  I like fast, semi icy corduroy on steeper blues and blacks.  I love linking longer turns.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

So, you want to know whether your skinny Eastern skis are adequate? You'll be happier with a wider ski, even if you plan to stay on groomers. Because lots of times runs groomed last night have seven inches of snow on them.

Beyond that statement, we need to know what resorts and terrain you are contemplating, what level skier you are (5, 6, 7?), etc. "Competent" doesn't tell us a thing. Neither does number of years skiing. (I've got 1314 days, but am only about a 7.5.) Where are you used to skiing, what runs?

 

Its not whether they are adequate, but what should I look for in a ski to compliment them.  I assume there isnt powder everyday... for those days will my im78's work well?  Should I look to go softer and wider for a do-everything ski?  I wouldnt mind more sidecut than these in general, to be honest.

 

I should be a pretty solid 8 on this scale:  http://www.vail.com/ski-and-snowboard-school/assess-your-ability-level.aspx#79#Top  I am sure there are aspects I am better at and worse at, for instance I dont ski stupid, icy eastern moguls.  I know how, but its not even fun so I havent done it in forever.  

 

Again, I dont know what terrain I will prefer when I havent skied it.  Id like to hit the entire mountain, and I'd like something that complements my current skiis or takes the place of my iM78's.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wuz a skier View Post
 

Skier 2369

 

You're going to love skiing out west.  I'm originally New England where I did a lot of skiing and for me the west is the place to be.

Skis:  Hang on to your Fishers, as long as they are in decent shape, they sound like great cruisers.  For new skis, try to demo some such as tsk94 suggests.

Boots:  Your boots will be fine as long as they work for you.  I have always thought once you have a boot that works, don't even DREAM of something else until the boots are worn out and can't be skied on anymore.

 

Have A Ball

 

Thanks so much for the response.  So I wont have to worry about a softer boot for a wide skis on powder days?  This is foreign to me.  Will the iM78's prove any use on days theres no fresh snow, or should I look to go wider and softer in general?

post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post
 

 

I have never skied a wider ski.  Out east I ski fast, metal skiis, as you can see from my description.  I like fast, semi icy corduroy on steeper blues and blacks.  I love linking longer turns.  

 

Its not whether they are adequate, but what should I look for in a ski to compliment them.  I assume there isnt powder everyday... for those days will my im78's work well?  Should I look to go softer and wider for a do-everything ski?  I wouldnt mind more sidecut than these in general, to be honest.

 

You could use your IM78's for days when there isnt any fresh snow, but the nice thing out west, atleast for me in British Columbia, even if it hasn't snowed, you still often ski soft cut up snow. So something wider, but still an everyday width, would probably work the best for you. And then for those dry spells or if you just want to do groomer laps, your 78's will be perfect. If you like stiffer skis with metal in them you should really check out K2's Annex series, either the 98 or 108 depending on how much soft snow performance you want. Volkl Mantra or Katana would work well also, and the Cochise would be an excellent choice aswell.

post #9 of 29

Width wise, given you have 78's, I'd go with around 98-105-ish.  I think you'll find that will be a daily use ski and the old skis will be spring bullet conditions for the AM in no time.  The Bonafide is very popular on this forum.  

post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk94 View Post

You could use your IM78's for days when there isnt any fresh snow, but the nice thing out west, atleast for me in British Columbia, even if it hasn't snowed, you still often ski soft cut up snow. So something wider, but still an everyday width, would probably work the best for you. And then for those dry spells or if you just want to do groomer laps, your 78's will be perfect. If you like stiffer skis with metal in them you should really check out K2's Annex series, either the 98 or 108 depending on how much soft snow performance you want. Volkl Mantra or Katana would work well also, and the Cochise would be an excellent choice aswell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Width wise, given you have 78's, I'd go with around 98-105-ish.  I think you'll find that will be a daily use ski and the old skis will be spring bullet conditions for the AM in no time.  The Bonafide is very popular on this forum.  

Thanks guys. Sounds like you both are recommending things along the same lines, which is good.

Even out east on days when it was cut up and I wanted to ski some crud or light powder, the iM78's lacked any real ability to float. Given that, will purely a wider underfoot ski fix that, or should I look for something softer as well? Especially since I'll probably keep the iM78's for all around groomer days just as you guys suggested.
post #11 of 29
Well, I'm no expert on equipment recommendations, can barely outfit myself, but I found softer skis are better in conditions that require the skis to be more terrain-accommodating, such as powder in tight trees, where the underlying surface is not a ballroom. On the other hand, firmer chop at speed, I like more ski, something with some metal in it, to blast through things. Others may disagree, but to me, speed/firmness - stiff ski, slower/softer/variable - softer ski. Naturally, with a whole mountain and varying surfaces, this becomes sort of a guess, grab, and hope most mornings.. I think, while some people have extensive quivers, that over time they gravitate to the skis that cover the most bases and find that their specialty skis don't get a lot of use.
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post



Thanks guys. Sounds like you both are recommending things along the same lines, which is good.

Even out east on days when it was cut up and I wanted to ski some crud or light powder, the iM78's lacked any real ability to float. Given that, will purely a wider underfoot ski fix that, or should I look for something softer as well? Especially since I'll probably keep the iM78's for all around groomer days just as you guys suggested.

 

Absolutely a wider ski will fix that. If you take a two say 105mm waisted skis and one is stiff and the other super soft, obviously the softer ski will be better in deep snow, but you lose versatility which for you I think is very important. Look for a stiffer ski, possibly with some metal in it, in that 98-110 range. That way you'll still get plenty of float but you'll have the versatility to use them on days when there is no new snow.

post #13 of 29
Quote:

 

 

 

 

So can you guys give me some recommendations as where I should be going from here?  I am 6'3, ~180 and a very competent skier, I have been skiing my whole life... but I have never competed or anything.  And as I said, I dont have any real experience out West.

 

Any help is appreciated.  The only thing I will note is I will look for some used skiis (and maybe boots depending on the recommendations), so any recommendations revolving around 2014 gear will fall on deaf ears.

 

 

Given that you are focused on prior year models, and that you like a bit of metal a nice choice might be the Line Influence 105.  It carves nicely on the groomers, the shape is pretty traditional so it won't feel too radical, but you get a wider platform with some early rise in the tip and tail that allows for some modern, loose skiing in variable conditions.  The Influence is a lot of ski, especially in 186 (which is probably your size), and it is not at all on the "soft" side of things.  But you are coming from stiff race skis and you are a reasonably big guy.  Or, keeping with Line, you might consider the Prophet 98 as a better entry into the modern all-mountain category (you might find a Prophet with last year's top sheet).  But you can find the Influence 105 around for a deal now because it was a ski that got kind of lost in the mix of a lot of great skis.  Just an idea. . . because you are searching the sale racks, it really depends more on what you find and how close that is to what you want than recommendations for your platonic ideal all-mountain ski.

 

As for stiff and powerful v. light and lively - that is a flavor choice for you.  Both approaches work, both are equally "expert."  You just need to decide which feel you prefer.

 

Good luck - I think that you will enjoy skiing in the west.

post #14 of 29

Skier 2369

 

As far as a softer boot, I would just stick with your Tecnicas, if they worked in the East for you.  Skiing in the West isn't all light powder/ bluebird days.  There can be stretches of clear weather and things firm up.    Actually, some of the WORST weather/conditions I have ever skied in has been in the West, but I digress….

 

Because  you are going to be in Phoenix, if you have never been to The Grand Canyon, you have to check it out.  A few years ago I spent a few days there in the fall (1st time there) and was blown away!!

post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the suggestions, comments and feedback guys.

I know this is a tougher time of the year to find used stuff, but I have never had an issue before. There's a surprisingly small amount of used skis for sale. I wonder if this will be a busier year on the slopes.
post #16 of 29

I'm a Taos skier, 60/70 days per year.  You said SE Colorado but I believe you mean SW Colorado.  That means the areas you're looking at are Taos, Wolf Creek, Telluride, and Purgatory.

 

A good daily driver at Taos is a ski with a waist from around 88 to 98 mm.  I think you should take a look at the new Rossi Sin 7 as a daily driver, even though you don't want new equipment.  The prior year was the Rossi S3.  Then later you may want to add a wider ski, especially if you're planning to hit powder days at Wolf Creek.  Sounds like though you're time is limited since you're talking about skiing only 12 days.  That greatly reduces the chances of hitting a great powder day.  A powder specific ski is an unnecessary luxury for your limited number of ski days.

 

If you're going to hit Taos for more than a week, look at the Taos Card to save some bucks.

post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
See below.
Edited by skier2369 - 11/6/13 at 3:34pm
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post

I'm a Taos skier, 60/70 days per year.  You said SE Colorado but I believe you mean SW Colorado.  That means the areas you're looking at are Taos, Wolf Creek, Telluride, and Purgatory.

A good daily driver at Taos is a ski with a waist from around 88 to 98 mm.  I think you should take a look at the new Rossi Sin 7 as a daily driver, even though you don't want new equipment.  The prior year was the Rossi S3.  Then later you may want to add a wider ski, especially if you're planning to hit powder days at Wolf Creek.  Sounds like though you're time is limited since you're talking about skiing only 12 days.  That greatly reduces the chances of hitting a great powder day.  A powder specific ski is an unnecessary luxury for your limited number of ski days.

If you're going to hit Taos for more than a week, look at the Taos Card to save some bucks.


Haha, you are right, Southwest CO. I am going to Wolf Creek for 4 days specifically. The dates aren't set in stone, but it should be early Feb so hopefully I see some good snow.

So you seem to be recommending a ski with less underfoot, more rocker and no metal, in contrast to the other recommendations. Do you mind if I pick your brain as to why? I'm very interested in hearing contrasting opinions and the reasoning behind them.
post #19 of 29

Oh good, I was afraid you were going try to ski Cuchara Valley which is closed :)

 

I like an 90ish ski for most of Colorado as a one ski quiver or as a daily driver with a wider second ski.  I could see going wider if you skied Wolf Creek, Alta, Snowbird or maybe the PNW all the time.  Wider than 90ish isn't any fun in the bumps which cover big chunks of our mountains IMO.

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post


Haha, you are right, Southwest CO. I am going to Wolf Creek for 4 days specifically. The dates aren't set in stone, but it should be early Feb so hopefully I see some good snow.

So you seem to be recommending a ski with less underfoot, more rocker and no metal, in contrast to the other recommendations. Do you mind if I pick your brain as to why? I'm very interested in hearing contrasting opinions and the reasoning behind them.

 

Two reasons:  your weight, which at 180 pounds is normal, and where you want to ski:  Taos.  Did you know that TSV does not groom the blacks and steeper terrain?  That means if you're going to ski anything above an intermediate slope, which would be blacks at many other resorts if not most, you're going to ski steep bumps, trees, or ungroomed steeps.  You need a ski that is quick, responsive, easy to turn, and flexible.  I have the S3 and I like it.  I have not skied the Sin 7, which replaced the S3, but from everything I've read and heard it is even better with less tip flap and a stiffer tail.  

post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

Oh good, I was afraid you were going try to ski Cuchara Valley which is closed :)

 

I like an 90ish ski for most of Colorado as a one ski quiver or as a daily driver with a wider second ski.  I could see going wider if you skied Wolf Creek, Alta, Snowbird or maybe the PNW all the time.  Wider than 90ish isn't any fun in the bumps which cover big chunks of our mountains IMO.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
 

 

Two reasons:  your weight, which at 180 pounds is normal, and where you want to ski:  Taos.  Did you know that TSV does not groom the blacks and steeper terrain?  That means if you're going to ski anything above an intermediate slope, which would be blacks at many other resorts if not most, you're going to ski steep bumps, trees, or ungroomed steeps.  You need a ski that is quick, responsive, easy to turn, and flexible.  I have the S3 and I like it.  I have not skied the Sin 7, which replaced the S3, but from everything I've read and heard it is even better with less tip flap and a stiffer tail.  

 

 

Makes sense.  In fact when I bought my im78's I thought they would be a little more flexible than they are... which ended up being fine for out east, but kept me wanting for something a little quicker and easier to turn.

 

 

So this leads me to a few questions:  What about float?  Does the rocker take care of this?  Am I seeing two schools of thought here, one a skinnier but more responsive ski, while the other wider and stiffer?  Both which will deal with the same types of terrain (and types of skiing)?  Or am I imagining this?

 

 

 

BTW.... I see what you guys are doing.  All mtn, mid 90's ski this year, fat powder ski next year.  It doesnt end.  :D

post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 
So after doing some more reading and thinking about what I am looking for based on the posts in this thread, I think I'd like to lean towards the quicker and slightly easier to ski end of the spectrum with these skis. Something that will be better in crud and trees and cut up terrain and that I won't lose if I get pushed back on my skis a bit, especially since I'm not as used to skiing those terrains.

Given this and all my previous info do you guys have some ski suggestions? I am also particularly interested in all wood vs wood & metal, what rocker design, and also whether I should be looking at a mid to high 180s ski or something a little shorter to make it easier on me. I assume if I go with a more flexible ski I can still stay on the 180s, but I'd like some opinions.

Thanks again.
post #23 of 29

Easy.  Look into a 177ish Volkl Kendo, Rossi E88, Nordica Steadfast, Blizzard Bushwacker/Brahma or the like.   There are many well reviewed ski in the category, and most have been around for several years so you should be able to find used or leftovers pretty cheap.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post
 

BTW.... I see what you guys are doing.  All mtn, mid 90's ski this year, fat powder ski next year.  It doesnt end.  :D

 

 

Yep, get a 90ish ski cheap this year.  That will be great for 80% of days with 6 inches or less, and better than your 78's on a powder day.   Then eventually add a 105+ ski if you like and see the value, or just demo on a powder day.

post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
 

I'm a Taos skier, 60/70 days per year.  You said SE Colorado but I believe you mean SW Colorado.  That means the areas you're looking at are Taos, Wolf Creek, Telluride, and Purgatory.

 

A good daily driver at Taos is a ski with a waist from around 88 to 98 mm.  I think you should take a look at the new Rossi Sin 7 as a daily driver, even though you don't want new equipment.  The prior year was the Rossi S3.  Then later you may want to add a wider ski, especially if you're planning to hit powder days at Wolf Creek.  Sounds like though you're time is limited since you're talking about skiing only 12 days.  That greatly reduces the chances of hitting a great powder day.  A powder specific ski is an unnecessary luxury for your limited number of ski days.

 

If you're going to hit Taos for more than a week, look at the Taos Card to save some bucks.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
 

 

Two reasons:  your weight, which at 180 pounds is normal, and where you want to ski:  Taos.  Did you know that TSV does not groom the blacks and steeper terrain?  That means if you're going to ski anything above an intermediate slope, which would be blacks at many other resorts if not most, you're going to ski steep bumps, trees, or ungroomed steeps.  You need a ski that is quick, responsive, easy to turn, and flexible.  I have the S3 and I like it.  I have not skied the Sin 7, which replaced the S3, but from everything I've read and heard it is even better with less tip flap and a stiffer tail.  

 

Looks like I am not going to make it to Taos this year, rather a week at Wolf Creek and probably another 4-5 days in Utah.  Does this change any of your suggestions?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

Easy.  Look into a 177ish Volkl Kendo, Rossi E88, Nordica Steadfast, Blizzard Bushwacker/Brahma or the like.   There are many well reviewed ski in the category, and most have been around for several years so you should be able to find used or leftovers pretty cheap.  

 

 

Yep, get a 90ish ski cheap this year.  That will be great for 80% of days with 6 inches or less, and better than your 78's on a powder day.   Then eventually add a 105+ ski if you like and see the value, or just demo on a powder day.

 

 

Been busy over the past month or so, but I did some reading the last couple days and it seems I am leaning towards this all mtn category.  My assumption is a 183ish ski wont hurt me at all, do you disagree?  

 

Also, what about the Mantra vs the Kendo and the Bonafides in the Blizzard line up, vs what you recommended?  Will the Kendo and Bonafide be too stiff, in your opinion?

 

 

 

Thanks guys! 

post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post
 

 

 

Looks like I am not going to make it to Taos this year, rather a week at Wolf Creek and probably another 4-5 days in Utah.  Does this change any of your suggestions?

 

 

 

 

Been busy over the past month or so, but I did some reading the last couple days and it seems I am leaning towards this all mtn category.  My assumption is a 183ish ski wont hurt me at all, do you disagree?  

 

Also, what about the Mantra vs the Kendo and the Bonafides in the Blizzard line up, vs what you recommended?  Will the Kendo and Bonafide be too stiff, in your opinion?

 

 

 

Thanks guys! 

 

I haven't skied the Kendo or the Bonafide.  I own the old red Mantra from 5 or so years ago.  The Mantra is a great ski but the one word missing from the reviews is fun.  It is fast and stable, not a great ski in powder.  

post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 

^  Thanks.  Any more opinions?

post #27 of 29
Quote:

Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post

 

I am leaning towards this all mtn category.  My assumption is a 183ish ski wont hurt me at all, do you disagree?  

 

Also, what about the Mantra vs the Kendo and the Bonafides in the Blizzard line up, vs what you recommended?  Will the Kendo and Bonafide be too stiff, in your opinion?

 

 

Here are my thoughts on the Mantra vs Kendo in a thread that also compares with the Bonafide.   That thread is worth a read:

http://www.epicski.com/t/118415/volkl-mantra-vs-kendo-vs-blizzard-bonafide-please-help#post_1559424

 

I'm also 180lbs and I'm not a big fan of the 184 Mantra or Kendo.  As I say in that post, I prefer the 177 Kendo, but also like the 170 for firm snow and bumps.

 

I think your decision depends a lot on how much you like your iM78's.   If you find you enjoy skiing them out west then a 98 would be a good addition.  If you are looking to replace them I think an 88 is a better choice, as I mentioned with a few names above.

post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

 

Here are my thoughts on the Mantra vs Kendo in a thread that also compares with the Bonafide.   That thread is worth a read:

http://www.epicski.com/t/118415/volkl-mantra-vs-kendo-vs-blizzard-bonafide-please-help#post_1559424

 

I'm also 180lbs and I'm not a big fan of the 184 Mantra or Kendo.  As I say in that post, I prefer the 177 Kendo, but also like the 170 for firm snow and bumps.

 

I think your decision depends a lot on how much you like your iM78's.   If you find you enjoy skiing them out west then a 98 would be a good addition.  If you are looking to replace them I think an 88 is a better choice, as I mentioned with a few names above.

 

 

Its funny you brought that up.  I had some time today and I went back and read some old threads and looked at the specs on my iM78's... a lot of people back in 2009 in CO/UT/CA were using these as an All Mtn ski and really liking them.  And I dont gain all that much except under the foot with going to any of these 88/90 models.  The tails and tips are not much fatter.  Seems theres a good chance my iM78's would be pretty usable until I traveled into deeper powder or needed a softer ski in general.  

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post
 

 

Looks like I am not going to make it to Taos this year, rather a week at Wolf Creek and probably another 4-5 days in Utah.  Does this change any of your suggestions?

 

 

Well, I think it is silly to buy a ski tailored to a specific mountain for a week of skiing there, but I can also say that Wolf Creek is a LOT more fun on a specific type of ski.

 

My daily driver is this- a 118 waist ski. It is pretty comparable to some of the wider skis on the Rossi S7 line and other rocker/taper tip and tail skis.

 

Its very fat for an everyday ski, but honestly, I'm considering getting something with even more float.

 

Wolf really likes a wide, floaty, surfy ski because its benchy- lines go from steep to flat all over the mountain, and on a deep day in those flats, you want every bit of float you can get to glide through the flats into the next steep part without getting bogged down and sunk.

 

Wolf Creek's grooming is also pretty minimal, and you can expect to spend less time on groomers and more time exploring the woods and skiing soft snow, which takes away most of the penalty of a wider ski.

 

But really, don't buy a specific ski for a 5 day trip. Demo a big powder ski like something on the S7 line or all the imitators out there. There are some pretty good little ski shops in Pagosa that demo good gear.

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