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demo ideas

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

im looking for opinions on which skis to demo this winter for a purchase in January. i currently run a set of the mostly white 168 cm K2 Rictors...i believe theyre 2012 or 2011s. I generally like the ski and they suffice for everything i do which is predominately on piste but man are they heavy. theyre probably a more advanced ski than what i need and i would like to demo something alot lighter, more playful, and smeary. im more of a cruiser who likes to play around on the mountain instead of carve my way strait downhill. i mostly bought the rictors on the cheap to get away from rental equipment. i definitely want twins as im looking into learning switch at some point this year.....but man theres alot of options out there. couple of people have tried to push me to gotamas but they seem a bit more big mountainish to me leaning more towards off piste. im probably 70-30 on/off

 

male

5' 8'' 190#

advanced beginner/early intermediate

post #2 of 23

I demo'd skis at Loveland a few years ago and was impressed by the rep's recommendations.  I skied some I'd heard of and wanted to try as well as some I didn't know about till that day.  I ended up buying the one's I hadn't heard about before (nordica patrons).  It's cool to go into it with something in mind but keep yourself open to the on-mountian recommendations.  

 

Loveland's demo deal worked good for me but I expect most mountains have a similar offer with good expertise.  

By the way, I do recommend the Patrons.  they are great all over the mountain.


Edited by river-z - 11/2/13 at 7:58pm
post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by river-z View Post
 

I demo'd skis at Loveland a few years ago and was impressed by the rep's recommendations.  I skied some I'd heard of and wanted to try as well as some I didn't know about till that day.  I ended up buying the one's I hadn't heard about before (nordics patrons).  It's cool to go into it with something in mind but keep yourself open to the on-mountian recommendations.  

 

Loveland's demo deal worked good for me but I expect most mountains have a similar offer with good expertise.  

By the way, I do recommend the Patrons.  they are great all over the mountain.


Nordica kills it!  Any twin tip with around an 80 mm waist should be enjoyable.  One of my pairs is a Salmon 1080 Spaceframe.  They are old, but they are a ton of fun and will carve like a demon no matter what anyone says.  Then again a good tune is everything no matter what you get.  Get some twins and have some fun!

post #4 of 23

See if you can find a pair of Solomon Rocker2 92s to try.  It's a twin tip that's pretty forgiving which should be good for your stated ability level and you can carve with it.  This was in last year's lineup from Solomon but I'm pretty sure it's been discontinued so you should be able to find good deals on it right now.

post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks, after skiing copper today on my rictors I'm set on light weight twins. Patrons were on my radar, what about the dead money.
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Rictors are battle tanks.
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Robertson View Post

Rictors are battle tanks.

They are unfazed by chop... Another way of looking at it.
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
Lmao....ya but they're like skiing with railroad timbers on my feet.
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
H E A V Y
post #10 of 23
What kind of bindings? I've got the Outlaws and Recons, Uncles of the Rictors, and the Recons weigh way more than the wider Outlaws because of the piston bindings I have on them.
post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Jesters
post #12 of 23

I share your pain. 

 

Volkl RTM 80. DPS Cassiar 85. 

post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Ya I'm buying new skis asap
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Robertson View Post

Ya I'm buying new skis asap

 

Am I correct in thinking from your other posts about moving to Colorado that you are a low intermediate level skier?

 

Honestly, a set of Rictors should be just about perfect for conditions that exist where you are skiing right now- manmade groomed snow.  Your stated preference for something more smeary really sounds like a stated preference for something that will punish you less for skidded turns, when the better answer may be spending less $$$ and taking a lesson.

 

The ski you buy as a low intermediate skier is very likely a ski you will hate once you progress in your skiing ability, which can be very fast when you get 30+ days a season instead of 3.

 

Thus my recommendations to take lessons first. If you keep skiing what you have and take a lesson or two, by the end of this season you should be a totally different skier from where you started, and will probably have a better idea of what type of ski you want. Some people want really playful skis, some people want skis with metal forged in Mt Doom damp enough to soak up a nuclear explosion. If you buy one of those now, you may find what you really like is the other.

 

Put another way, I generally don't recommend beginning skiers spend a lot of cash on skis, unless their current equipment is just totally inappropriate for skill level. Rictors sounds quite reasonable for where you are as a skier, but yes, they are on the heavier side.

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
I would say low intermediate is a good bracket for my skiing. I can ski blues without issue and have a lot of fun doing just that...I will admit, as you say I may be looking for a ski that's leanient to my tendancies
post #16 of 23
Demo stuff through the winter.
Get a good deal on your favorite in the spring.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Robertson View Post

I will admit, as you say I may be looking for a ski that's leanient to my tendancies

Which we all do- this is pretty much why people have a huge variance in their preference for skis. Nothing really wrong with that.

 

I'm just pointing out that the ski you buy now could be the ski you hate when you get better. Or, the ski you buy now could make it easy enough to ski with a low intermediate technique that those techniques become ingrained- making it a lot harder to learn to progress.

post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 
The proverbial fork in the road...so to speak
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Robertson View Post

The proverbial fork in the road...so to speak

Not as serious lol~but maybe consider demoing later? As others have pointed out, the skis you have are good for your level. Might as well just commit to them. Trying out more skis may just confuse you quite a bit more, to a point where you will no longer be sure if the problem is with your skills, or the skis. Also another possibility is that you may not like the same pair of skis that you have demoed and liked a few weeks ago because you skill level has progressed quite a lot (it is very likely to happen if you have determined to ski quite a lot) and the characteristics of that pair may no longer suit your style. So maybe just forget about getting new gears completely since you have your own gears already and solely focus on learning how to ski first? Just my 2 cents: ) 

post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
Its not that I feel that there's really a problem with the skis....just a lot more taxing and heavier than I thought they would be. Certainly not the rossi skis I was used to demoing in taos every year. So far I've got three trips out on them this year. Ill continue on them for a bit...but these are by far the heaviest ski I've ever put to heel.
post #21 of 23

Consider doing the Breeze Demo pass.  I think it was $239 last year and you can demo all you want, except you can only pick them up at Lakewood, Dumont or Frisco.  It's a blast to try all the different skis and sizes.  A drawback is you have to stop to pick up skis, but there is a Starbucks at Dumont and you can keep them up to three days.   Even if you were to demo 5 days it pays for itself.  I pretty much skied the demos all the time, so it probably costs me less than buying skis.

 

My MO for the last decade has been to get a demo pass for a year or two until I find a ski I love, then buy them cheap and burn through a couple pair, then rinse and repeat as ski technology progresses.

 

Edit: on second thought, where you skiing is might not be the best time to demo a whole bunch.  Being on different skis every day can be an additional challenge to learning.  Maybe just make your current skis your b*tch this year, then do the demo pass next year.

post #22 of 23
How long are they? Just wondering, couldn't find a weight for them, but did find that my Recons were listed as being four pounds apiece -- without the bindings, which as I said add a lot to them. The Jester binding doesn't seem like it would be heavy.

I'm finding it heard to imagine, for skiing on groomers and not in the park, how a guy who is roughly my size is bothered by the admitted weight of those skis, given I'm a 62 year old female, and not terribly fit. Are you trying to get air, or jump? If not, then where is the weight issue coming in, except sitting on the chair? In which case, use the foot rest until your legs get built up.
post #23 of 23

Christy Sports and Ski & Golf/Boulder Ski Deals do a demo day at Loveland where all the reps show up with their demo fleets.  There is a small fee but if you buy a ski they credit the fee towards your purchase.  Do this and you will get to ski everything back to back for a few runs and the cream will rise to the top.

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