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Bevel question

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hey guys,

Quick question. Four degree sides, do any of you have them on your fis/cheater carvers? I'm about to put in an order for base and side guides and I want to make sure. I'm not missing out. Usually on a .75 - 3 for gs. But I'm not a seasoned tuner. I set up a bend and will take over tuning for the family. I figure they will be okay with 1 - 2's. But if like to know what a .5 - 4 skis like. I'm on fis and cheaters in the east all the time. I have a feeling most will say 3 is enough, but I'm curious if any feels like articulating the cons to a 4.
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 
Bloody phone typos.
post #3 of 9
I have raced with a 4 side and have tuned for others at 4. The pros would be of course increased grip on hard, icy snow. A con would be on hard chalky, or "grippy" snow where edge grip is usually rather easy to achieve...too acute in this snow and you can "knife". That being said, i suppose it depends on the conditions you will typically encounter. I see you are from the east....

zenny
post #4 of 9
Some bevel guides (like svst) have shims available to convert 3 to 4, a twofer deal.

.5 / 4 is responsive and grips well after eastern weather events. Be sure you are confident releasing the old turn or they may not want to, especially if you take them into the bumps. If your technique is strong and you stay on top of your turns, there's no reason not to try 4. It may take a few runs to get the hang of brushed or feathered turns, pivot slips, and other things that involve not edge locking because you'll need to develop a little finer edge control.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback,

 

I'm in Lots of manmade / natural mixed in over time for months.   Steeps / fallaways to aim for, Speed, Cold, stiff and sheer, but always edgeable.  It's interesting to consider what you say about the "brushed or feathered turns, pivot slips".  It sounds like it could demand a change in technique, which is exciting and terrifying.  If I'm not in gates, strictly freeskiing,  and not necessarily holding myself to a tight gs course line, then will 'stivots', or the other two-word combo that I heard on the Solden commentary that made sense but cannot remember, play into my turns due to the edge articulation while 'getting to" and "coming off"  the most extreme lay out angle in a turn?

 

A .75 base 4 side is appealing.

 

It's very hard not to over think this...

 

I try to make my transitions as quick as the terrain will allow, enjoying the speed that the heel pressure builds late in a turn.  And while it's certainly not textbook technique, the speed and control change is fun.   Getting knifed in though sounds a little dreadful for my style, but I'm not sure.  Is it the base angle that has the most to do with that?

 

 

 

post #6 of 9
Getting knifed is more of a result ot the type of snow combined with a highly acute bevel. Since the base and side combine to form the overall acuteness, one could say the both are factored in to this--HOWEVER, base bevels typically dictate whether a ski engages quickly or not (as in, how soon it begins to hook up after rolling onto edge) and side bevels dictate edge grip. Base bevels will be responsible for ease (or dis-ease) of sideslips, pivots, etc and in general when the ski is sliding, not carving. A lower bevel like a .5 can "catch" more easily when sideslipping than a 1, for instance as the base edge is not as relieved from the snow.

Its the side which will help you hold an edge on the hard stuff, although if one were to go to much with the base edge (lets say a 1.5+) grip can begin to suffer as it will lessen the overall acuteness. But we dont usually consider this as most hard snow skiers know better than to go that high...

Since your asking about stivots and such, I have to ask how much racing experience do you have? As sharpedges has said, skier ability does come into play. .75/4 or .5/4 are fairly agressive...

zenny
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks Zenny, 

 

Grew up racing in Vt long ago, I haven't been in gates regularly in years.  I can adjust the edges on a pair to make them more acute for boilerplate days.  Will tune other shorter GS skis less aggressively, to start at least, and focus them on grippy packed pow days.  I just know I go wanting for the ability to put more energy into the max extension portion of my turn and it seems to be all about the confidence in either the edge shape or sharpness, or the combo of the two, I suppose.  I haven't been diligent enough over the years with the maintenance or tech but I think I'm beginning to understand what needs to happen, thanks.  

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

Getting knifed is more of a result ot the type of snow combined with a highly acute bevel. Since the base and side combine to form the overall acuteness, one could say the both are factored in to this--HOWEVER, base bevels typically dictate whether a ski engages quickly or not (as in, how soon it begins to hook up after rolling onto edge) and side bevels dictate edge grip. Base bevels will be responsible for ease (or dis-ease) of sideslips, pivots, etc and in general when the ski is sliding, not carving. A lower bevel like a .5 can "catch" more easily when sideslipping than a 1, for instance as the base edge is not as relieved from the snow.

Its the side which will help you hold an edge on the hard stuff, although if one were to go to much with the base edge (lets say a 1.5+) grip can begin to suffer as it will lessen the overall acuteness. But we dont usually consider this as most hard snow skiers know better than to go that high...

Since your asking about stivots and such, I have to ask how much racing experience do you have? As sharpedges has said, skier ability does come into play. .75/4 or .5/4 are fairly agressive...

zenny

Couldn't have said it better myself!!!!  The:D Zenster is a smart guy!

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

Couldn't have said it better myself!!!!  The:D Zenster is a smart guy!

 

 

   No I'm not. But I think I've stayed at a Holiday Inn Express before...:drool

 

   zenny

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