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Time for some serious boots for a fast growing pre-teenager - but her feet grows every year - WHAT TO DO?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
My two daughters who are 12 and 15 years old, have been skiing since they were 3 and 6 years old. I wouldn't call them experts but they are certainly intermediates and can ski any Western Blue or black runs with confidence and decent skills. Ski schools during the early years gave them a good foundation and skiing with me in challenging terrain all these years makes them fairly confident. They can ski trees, powder and some bumps but they hate bumps. (They love trees).

They have their own sets of skis and boots and having skied this long, both girls know the general drill about ski boot fit and all that jazz. They have gone through about 12 boots between the two of them - primarily because of having to change ski boot sizes almost every 15 or so months. So far the change of boots that they have used in the past three or four years have been okay. Comfortable but snug, and more importantly - made them ski pretty well with full control of the skis - which they own (another story).

The 15 YO is about 5'6" and weighs about 125 lbs and her growth spurt has pretty much stabilized. Her feet grew but only by a 0.25 inch this year from last and she can still fit into her 25.5 Salomon Idols. She is pretty content with these boots - which are the same model boots as my wife but a size bigger. (My wife uses a size 24.5) The 15 YO has totally normal shaped feet.

Now the 12 YO is the challenge.

She is about 5'3 and weighs only 92 lbs. A really skinny kid. But her feet continues to grow by about 1cm every year! Her feet are now bigger than her sister and bigger than her mother's feet. Her Asics running shoes are a size 9.5. Last year she was using Salomon Divine boots in size 24.5 and now she can barely fit on them and her toes are all curled up. She tried her sisters boots (the 25.5 Idols) and likes them but she said her bunions hurt too much. This makes the situation more complicated. She has a skinny legs, ankles and heels but she has wide forefeet and her bunion have grown - a genetic curse that I passed on that I got from my parents and grandparents.

We went to a ski shop looking for a good but not too expensive boot but they did not have any kids boots to offer for her weight and size. They suggested that since she is still growing, we get her wide seasonal rental boots because she would just outgrow any boot we buy this year. My daughter would not hear of it and refused to get "rental boots". Even if we did, they were not willing to "punch" the rental boots to adjust for the bunions.

Would appreciate some advice on this matter as to which model would be appropriate to start her out on. She definitely needs a woman size boot (not for kids) but they have to be soft enough for her to flex and ski.

I am willing to invest in a good boot for her but they have to be able to fit a skinny growing and pretty good skier. The boots will also have to be punched for her bunions. But I don't want to spend $350 or more for boots that she will be using only for 15 days of skiing this season. Tomorrow she will try out some Atomic Live Fit 90 or 80 so see if the live fit feature on those boots would alleviate the bunion pain.

Thanks for the feedback.
post #2 of 11

http://epicski.onthesnow.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

 

click on and read the above article and perform a "shell check" on any boot you would purchase for your daughter---you might then buy one that is at the outer range of a good shell fit, hoping she won't outgrow it by next season.

 

Some of the new heat moldable shell boots in the lower price ranges would fit around her heels and forefoot well and come in 80 flex ranges.

 

The live fit is a high volume boot (heels would swim)

 

her older sisters 25s (or any) boot shell can be stretched to fit around a bunion.

 

Find a boot fitter---(not a boot seller) and let him check her feet and make suggestions.

 

good luck

 

mike

post #3 of 11

also check that she is on both adult bindings and boots.   Some Jr boots go up to 25, and will only work with jr bindings.

 

 

Jr boots are much cheaper, but also have much worse quality buckles, liners, etc.  for 15 days a year this MIGHT be ok, but just FYI.

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys.

She is already on adult boots but I have been getting away with the "middle of the range" stuff for the past couple of years. But I guess its time for some decent boots. I am going to a boot fitter this weekend to discuss some options. I understand the Atomic live first are voluminous but those rubber sides solves the big bunion problem. Just need to see how they fit on her first before making that decision. One option I am considering is just letting the 12 YO use the size 25 boots of her sister (the 15 YO) since those boots fits her quite well. We can just have those punched for bunions.

As for the 15 YO (who will end up losing her boot), since her feet growth has pretty much stabilized, I will get her fitted for a really good 25.5 sized boot which will provide that half a size allowance for growth. I doubt her feet will get any bigger than they are right now.

Thanks again.
post #5 of 11

FYI:   any boot can be punched (the atomic as well)   the atomic system just helps a less experianced boot fitter get some results too. 

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Ok, danke!
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist View Post

Thanks guys.



As for the 15 YO (who will end up losing her boot), since her feet growth has pretty much stabilized, I will get her fitted for a really good 25.5 sized boot which will provide that half a size allowance for growth. I doubt her feet will get any bigger than they are right now.

Thanks again.

One last thought---you may not be aware that a 25.0 and a 25.5 are exactly the same "shell size" and "liner size" and fit the same except for the thickness of the factory insole----in a 25.0 the insole will be thicker under the toes (feels tighter) and in a 25.5 it will be thinner, which will feel roomier.

 

Does she measure 25.5cm on a mondo board??

if she does, you should go by the shell fit mentioned before in this thread, not by the size label stuck on the outside by the manufacturer.

 

mike

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi Mike,

Yes, I am aware of the "shell size" versus "liner size" differences and how insoles make up the difference between full and half size boot sizing. I constantly look at the BSLs for all their boots and monitor their growth and boot changes through the change in BSLs.

Each year at the start of the ski season, the entire family makes an evaluation of everybody's ski boots and the first thing we all do is the shell fit. Of course, my wife and I don't need to change our boots (unless she agrees that I get new ones smile.gif) but the girls know the drill with regard to shell fitting.

Thanks for the feedback.
post #9 of 11

The fact that they grow is hardly unique to your two but I know that it seems like they change a size when you aren't looking. We sell several hundred Jr race boots every year and race parents all have the same questions that you do. As far as the size goes we always give them the same advice..........."Do you want the boots to fit now............or at some time in the future? If it's the latter, what size will they be then?"

 

I know this sounds sarcastic and it probably is but just a little. A fitter can pick the right shape and the right flex only for what he can see right now, not next month or next year. It's a fair bet that if the boots fit a year from now................they don't fit now.

 

SJ

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
I'm with you on that Jim and if there is one thing I make sure about my girls boots - is that they don't fit sloppy. It is precisely because of this that they have had to change boots every year. It's just been so bloody expensive. I just went to a ski shop last weekend and I brought the 24.5 boots of the 12 YO (doesn't fit her anymore) and the shop owner said the boots are a good enough model and condition that he was willing to take them in for a trade in and use them for his rental program. I would have done that in a heartbeat but I was not too impressed by the options he was offering for sale. Also his bootfitter (a young kid) said they do not normally punch and grind boots because he would rather just get the right liner. This he said after seeing my daughter's bunion.

So this weekend I am off to another bootfitter whom I have known for years. I hope he can give me some options to choose from for my daughter that is not going to be too expensive.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist View Post

I'm with you on that Jim and if there is one thing I make sure about my girls boots - is that they don't fit sloppy. It is precisely because of this that they have had to change boots every year. It's just been so bloody expensive. I just went to a ski shop last weekend and I brought the 24.5 boots of the 12 YO (doesn't fit her anymore) and the shop owner said the boots are a good enough model and condition that he was willing to take them in for a trade in and use them for his rental program. I would have done that in a heartbeat but I was not too impressed by the options he was offering for sale. Also his bootfitter (a young kid) said they do not normally punch and grind boots because he would rather just get the right liner. This he said after seeing my daughter's bunion.

So this weekend I am off to another bootfitter whom I have known for years. I hope he can give me some options to choose from for my daughter that is not going to be too expensive.

 

If her bunion is large enough that she is getting shell contact when shell fitting, then a liner is no answer. There is nothing wrong with punching a jr. boot if it is good quality plastic. Some of the cheap boots do use a blended plastic that may be problematic to punch but something good like say a Lange RS 70 SC among others is good enough material that it can be easily done.

 

SJ

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › Time for some serious boots for a fast growing pre-teenager - but her feet grows every year - WHAT TO DO?