or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Prep for New Skis

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I recently got a pair of new Rossi Avengers (thanks to the advice of this community).  I've heard some conflicting advice on whether or not I need to do some prep work on the skis prior to the start of season.  Can you help clarify if I need to tune new skis?

 

FWIW, the bases are smooth but there are small scratches near the tip.  I'm not sure if these were already scratched when I received them or if they got there when the shop mounted my bindings...

post #2 of 13

My opinion... don't get em tuned what ever you do.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

can you help explain why? i'm pretty new to all this and am curious why some people say I need a full tune and other say to do nothing

post #4 of 13

Ski them first.  You might like the tune on them.  If you don't then pay for a tune.

post #5 of 13

There are numerous thread about this.  General consensus:  Have the shop use a true bar to verify the skis are flat (often not the case out of the wrapper).  If necessary, do a light grind.  Have the skis waxed (factory wax is not the best).  Then, go have fun!

post #6 of 13

Ski 'em.  Worry about the details after you know what they do. 

post #7 of 13

I usually wipe new skis down with base cleaner then apply a fresh coat of wax.  Maybe a quick pass along the edges with a diamond stone.  That's about it.  Skis can pick up a lot of grime sitting in the store; dust, lots of people handling them etc. 

 

In regards to "don't tune them" advice, what is meant by that is that you probably shouldn't change the edge bevel to a different angle than the factory one before trying them first.  Factory bevel is most commonly base: 1 degree, side: 2 degrees.  There's no harm in sharpening them to the same angle, it's just not usually necessary.  

post #8 of 13

If you just want to slide around the hill and don't really care about techie thingies just ski them.  The money you save can go to beers.

 

If your technique is strong, and/or your feet sensitive, have your shop check the bases for flat, and edges for the correct angle and have them fix these if they need fixing and wax the bases, they last longer and the ski turns much better with wax.

 

Mass production makes for poor quality control.  Even then, many skis arrive with a zero-zero edge which is great for mountaineering, but not all that fun on-piste.

 

I got some new Volkls with a Zero base(not fun at all), the first shop couldn't grind one degree on the base so I went to the competition with the glidewell system and got my requested 1 and 3 grind.

 

If you are of the first grouping, ride them hard and put them away wet, be proud that you never had a tune and can ski the pants off the techie, just beware that those sticks will not last very long and the beer budget will suffer when you replace them.

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

Given that I'm still an intermediate skier, I don't think I would notice much from a tune-up at this point, and it doesn't sound like it's all that necessary.  Frankly, I'm pretty confused as to what many of the specifics like bevel, edge angle, etc. mean and how it impacts my skiing.

 

What I am concerned about, though, is making sure I don't trash my skis like Buttinski warned.  How do I know when I need a tune-up? 

post #10 of 13
I think as an Ice Coast skier, your tune is going to be way more important than it would be for those of us skiing powder. I've never had a significant base flatness issue with new skis, but I'd check it nevertheless, with a ruler and a flashlight, as I assume you don't own a true bar. Yeah, the ruler might not be straight, but it's better than nothing. If there's light coming through, then toddle off to your local ski shop for a grind, without a change to the existing side bevel as clearly you don't know what you like at this point. Have them slap some wax on them as well, as it contributes to the health of the skis and as a casual skier, it might be the only time you do it.

Then, spend time on here so you start to develop an understanding of all this stuff. Skiing where you do, tuning is a key ingredient to happiness and confidence.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by itpski View Post
 

Given that I'm still an intermediate skier, I don't think I would notice much from a tune-up at this point, and it doesn't sound like it's all that necessary.  Frankly, I'm pretty confused as to what many of the specifics like bevel, edge angle, etc. mean and how it impacts my skiing.

 

What I am concerned about, though, is making sure I don't trash my skis like Buttinski warned.  How do I know when I need a tune-up? 


edge bevel is pretty simple concept.  All alpine skis are adjusted a couple degrees off of a strict 90 degrees for better performance.  Base edges are almost always set to 1 degree bevel, meaning 1 degree off from totally flat with the plastic base of the ski.  Side edges are commonly set from 1 to 3 degrees.  Side edge bevel determines how quickly the edges will catch in the snow.  1 being slowly (for beginners) and 3 being quickly (sometimes desired by advanced skiers).  Most common side bevel is 2. 

 

When to determine when skis need a tune-up:  You'll notice your skis becoming less responsive after a few days of use.  This is because the edges have become dull.  You can also check the sharpness by hand by running your finger nail against them.  If the edge shaves off a little bit of nail material, they're still fairly sharp.  If your nail easily swipes across without any material shaved off, they're dull.  Take a look at the edges and see if there are any gouges and non-superficial scratches; those should be repaired.  If there's rust... you've waited too long.  :p

 

Just general maintenance goes a long way too.  Bring your skis inside at the end of the day and wipe off excess snow.  Wait a few hours until the rest of it melts, and give them another wipe down.  That alone will add years to the life of your new skis. 

 

edit--- Here's a good page of information about edge bevels and the reasons for setting them in a given way: Edge Tuning for Skis and Snowboards


Edited by herbiebug - 10/30/13 at 1:17pm
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 

thanks for the tips and link.  there's a ton of interesting stuff there.

I'm going to assume the small scratches that i have on my skis aren't a big deal.  I don't know how they got there given that the skis are brand new, but I guess it is what it is.

post #13 of 13

I really like a new base... for a long time.  So many shops a good a fking up bases.  They try to add structure and then you have a mess.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion