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Getting in shape to ski? - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post

I plan on starting my ski season in about 5 weeks

Does anybody have any suggestions on what kind of exercises or stretching I should start doing?

Is there a program for getting in shape on this or snother website?

Take a look at Bumps for Boomers Phase I and II.  Designed to be done 6-8 weeks before ski season starts.  I like the fact that it can be done at home with little equipment.

 

http://dev.bumpsforboomers.com/basic-ski-fitness-free-online-video-skiing-exercises

post #32 of 41

How about Insanity? Great program to get fit and works different muscle groups. There's a lot of lower body movements to strengthen your legs and core.

post #33 of 41

I hike, climb small hills (like 200 ft vertical) try aerobics, small weights for triceps, pushups, situps, sitting against the wall in tuck position... running is good if your knees can take it.

post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post

I plan on starting my ski season in about 5 weeks

Does anybody have any suggestions on what kind of exercises or stretching I should start doing?

Is there a program for getting in shape on this or snother website?

 

Here is one you can do in one hour, in your living room while watching the evening news, I like Colbert & the Daily Show. Nothing groundbreaking but I think it gives a good mix of cardio, flexibility and stretching. The only equipment you need is a piece of 2 x8 and a stopwatch.

 

http://www.skilouise.com/support/pdf/doctorattalla_exerciseprogram.pdf

post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

Any tennis players out there? How do you think singles tennis carries over?

For me, it is more a matter of healing from my season of tennis before getting to ski...

post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

I've been doing one night of ski fitness at the club.  It's a mixed bag of plyometrics, yoga, pilates, and other stuff.  I do two nights a week with two of my fellow 1963 vintage instructors with weights, TRX, Bosu, and balance board stuff.  I do two morning Yoga classes each week, one for skiing and one called sculpt.  I also do a skiing specific TRX class one morning each week.  I have been jumping rope every day this month.  I'm trying to do some TRX and foam rolling every day, but haven't got there yet.

 

It's made a huge difference.  I feel like I'm going to crush it this year.

just starting using a TRX; so cool.  Great suggestions though. Core, core, core, procipriation, stretching are so essential.  Weight training is probably the least value.  However, don't overlook getting shoulders back and arms in decent shape.

 

I know this sounds obnoxious but don't get out of shape. ;)


Edited by Finndog - 11/20/13 at 10:20am
post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

I've been doing one night of ski fitness at the club.  It's a mixed bag of plyometrics, yoga, pilates, and other stuff.  I do two nights a week with two of my fellow 1963 vintage instructors with weights, TRX, Bosu, and balance board stuff.  I do two morning Yoga classes each week, one for skiing and one called sculpt.  I also do a skiing specific TRX class one morning each week.  I have been jumping rope every day this month.  I'm trying to do some TRX and foam rolling every day, but haven't got there yet.

 

It's made a huge difference.  I feel like I'm going to crush it this year.

just starting using a TRX; so cool.  Great suggestions though. Core, core, core, procipriation, stretching are so essential.  Weight training is probably the least value.  However, don't overlook getting shoulders back and arms in decent shape.

Took me a while to decide about the TRX, but after using it with a personal trainer last fall, I decided it was pretty useful.  Especially after she came up with several more ski-specific exercises.  Definitely have a stronger core as a result.

post #38 of 41

For those not familiar with TRX

 

One nice thing its compact and can be used on the back of a door for the majority of use for about $160.00  

post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

just starting using a TRX; so cool.  Great suggestions though. Core, core, core, procipriation, stretching are so essential.  Weight training is probably the least value.  However, don't overlook getting shoulders back and arms in decent shape.

 

I know this sounds obnoxious but don't get out of shape. ;)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

For those not familiar with TRX

 

One nice thing its compact and can be used on the back of a door for the majority of use for about $160.00  

 

That doesn't sound obnoxious to me.  Simply good advice!

 

I built a very nice TRX knock off for under $20.  They are about $200 on E-Bay, but those come with a DVD and a wall chart:rolleyes.  I found a lot of really great TRX workouts on YouTube for free.

 

I like the simplicity of TRX and it's effectivness.  All I need is a jump rope, a foam roller, a TRX, and a few feet of space to get a lot done.  I still like going to Barts' house and the club;).

post #40 of 41
I used to be of the crowd that believed in skiing into shape for skiing. I was fairly active over the summers climbing ladders and lifting stuff, but I always had some quad pain to go with the shin discomfort from the boots.

Now the Vail Resorts fitness test demands a bit more preparation. One of the tests is stepping up on a 12-inch riser at a pace of 96 beats a minute (four beats to one step up cycle) for five minutes. That's 120 ups in five minutes on a riser at least half again as tall as a normal stairstep. We also have to do fifteen situps, 15 pushups and balance on each foot on a foam pad.

Three years ago, when the testing started and I spent at least a month before hand preparing, was the first season I didn't have any quad discomfort after the first few days on skis.
post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post
 

Activities that require you to learn new balance skills are better than those that don't.  

Except for ice skating, there are no activities that cross over very much to specific ski skills. 

Find something you like and stick with it.  

 

BK

 

Inline skating requires the same 5 skills (stance&balance, pivoting, edging, pressure control, timing&coordination) and recruits the same muscle groups as skiing. Skiers do still need to move through development levels on skates to get to the point where cross-training is useful. A good inline skating coach can help. The learning is part of the fun. But it takes well over 5 weeks to get to that point (I'd say more like a couple of seasons with regular coaching). 

 

I agree that any balance activity is better than nothing. 

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