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The best bump ski in my quiver?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Dynastar contact cross ti 172cm: seem a little stiff and very heavy but quick edge to edge

Fischer Watea 94 178cm: much lighter, not as stiff, but longer turning radius

or....

I have an old pair of Olin DTSL 181cm (the yellow ones maybe 1996?) prob 60mm at waist 90mm at tip or so. I haven't skied them in over 5 years and I've improved significantly since then. I pulled them out of the garage to have a looksy and they are super light and seem pretty flexible at the tip in comparison to the others so I got thinkin they may make decent bump skis. I'm not zipperlining or anything close but I do enjoy trying to make my way down medium sized moguls on a moderate pitch.

 

Thoughts please??? thnks

Agreen

post #2 of 27

Straight, light, waist under 70mm, softer tip and stiffer tail. Something in the 179cm-186cm range depending on the skier.

post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Straight, light, waist under 70mm, softer tip and stiffer tail. Something in the 179cm-186cm range depending on the skier.

I know it doesn't fit most of those parameters but I'm wondering how the new Soul 7-s will do in the bumps given it's lightness, quickness and soft tip.  


Edited by Lorenzzo - 10/27/13 at 8:09pm
post #4 of 27
I felt the Watea 94 was pretty good in the bumps when I tried them. A little narrower is better for bumps, but 94 is a great all-mountain ski.
post #5 of 27

please, get rid of the olins unless you still use radio shack TR 80.

post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by frkny View Post
 

please, get rid of the olins unless you still use radio shack TR 80.

 

That's the only place I could find my Atari though

post #7 of 27

If I had to ski bumps on one of your skis, I would go for the Dynastar as I like my 172 Contact 10(/11/Ltd) for bumps.  The cross ti may be just a bit stiffer, but I think the dimensions are the same with a 72 mm waist.

 

I don't know anything about the Olins, but some people do like the older straighter skis for bumps.

post #8 of 27

Well let's see here.  Dimensions of the most popular competition mogul skis.  They are basically older GS skis without metal laminates so they are a bit more flexible.

 

Hart F-17 Classic:

Dimensions: 
104-64-92
 
Moment Mowgli
Dimensions: 94-66-83
Turn Radius: 25m
 
K2 Mamba 244
Ski dimension: 92-66-82mm
 
Sure, you can ski other wider, and more modern shaped skis in the bumps and do it pretty well.,  But, not as popular among the experts.
 
I'd say the Olins are closest to that criteria.  But they probably suck for everything else except fast cruising on hardpack.
 
 
post #9 of 27

^^^  The dimensions make them pretty much a single purpose ski.  I'm typically looking for an all-mountain that's fun in the bumps.  Sorry about the thread diversion.

post #10 of 27
Quote:

Originally Posted by agreen View Post

 

I'm not zipperlining or anything close but I do enjoy trying to make my way down medium sized moguls on a moderate pitch.

 

 

If you are not zipperlining, then the competition bump skis or you older straight skis are not the ticket.   Your shorter, quicker turning skis should be better for picking your way through the bumps as long as they are not too stiff.

 

Here's an idea: do a personal demo day and try them all in the same conditions, since you've already got the skis. Then you'll know for sure!

post #11 of 27

Well OP asked for "The best bump ski in my quiver" so I answered that question.  I can ski a bump ski all day long all over the mountain.  I do prefer something a bit fatter in a lot of fresh but have managed in over 24" off piste using them.  Anyway, like I said they pretty much suck for everything else except GS turns on hardpack.  I still prefer the livelyness and quick edge changes for bumps in general and not just zipperlining.  Avoiding obstacles is best on narrower skis.  Blasting through crud is different though and requires something beefier and heavier is a plus there.

post #12 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies. I think Ill give them a shot this season. I would only use them in firmer conditions... definitely not powder bumps. The Dynastars with the Look binding setup just seem so heavy and Im thinking I may have more success pickin my way thru the bumps with a lighter ski. The Fischers are light and lively but on the wide side for my skill level in hard pack.

 

Lorenzzo: Im sure the souls would be fine in soft bumps but prob a bit difficult to manage in firmer conditions?

post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

Dynastar contact cross ti 172cm: seem a little stiff and very heavy but quick edge to edge

Fischer Watea 94 178cm: much lighter, not as stiff, but longer turning radius

or....

I have an old pair of Olin DTSL 181cm (the yellow ones maybe 1996?) prob 60mm at waist 90mm at tip or so. I haven't skied them in over 5 years and I've improved significantly since then. I pulled them out of the garage to have a looksy and they are super light and seem pretty flexible at the tip in comparison to the others so I got thinkin they may make decent bump skis. I'm not zipperlining or anything close but I do enjoy trying to make my way down medium sized moguls on a moderate pitch.

 

Thoughts please??? thnks

Agreen

The contact cross is less stiff and lighter than the ti version...

I also have a pair of Volkl Tigershark 10 feet bought at the end of the season that I'm eager to try in bumps!

post #14 of 27

 

Scott's The Ski is the best ski in my quiver for bumps. The Ski is playful, as a great shape and with it's medium early rise it enters the turn really nice. 

post #15 of 27
Quote:
 

Dynastar contact cross ti 172cm: seem a little stiff and very heavy but quick edge to edge

Fischer Watea 94 178cm: much lighter, not as stiff, but longer turning radius

 

My beaten-up teaching skis are Contact LTD/11s (which I think became the 'Cross Ti' in later model years).  I also used to have a pair of Watea 94s.  Well, I still have them, they're just unmounted and I want to sell them...

 

I much, much preferred the 94 in the bumps.  Less sidecut, not nearly as stiff.  Much more forgiving.  But I've seen people (better skiers than me!) slay horrible, icy bumps on skis like the Contacts (Fischer Progressor 9, Head SuperShape, etc.) too.

 

Neither of them is a competition bump ski (narrow, short, softish, little sidecut)... but like others said that's probably not what you want unless you only want to zipperline tight moguls all day.

post #16 of 27

Scott Punishers are my favorite bump skis, (the older ones from '09 - '10 not the new fat ones). The dimensions are 172 cm long, 126-86-113 with a 14 meter turn radius. (I'm 5'8" x 160 lbs). These are light, fun skis, that ski most everything well, especially softer snow, spring slush bumps, etc.. Not great on boilerplate carving, but that requires a different ski. You can probably buy a pair cheap too.

Mike

post #17 of 27

I'll agree that a wider ski does very well in softer spring bumps AKA slushbumps.  But for those icy, rutted, frozen bumps that most people fear a good carving edge is optimal.  I suppose it all depends on your location.  Midwest or Northeast I'd go with the narrower GS type ski for sure.  Out West, Colorado, Utah, Squaw, etc a more forgiving all mountain ski will do fine 90% of the time.  The bumps I grew up skiing had sheets of bulletproof between them most of the time.

post #18 of 27
I agree and have enjoyed my V-Werks Codes in the bumps, particularly if thay're really firm. With infrequent snow the last couple of years we've had a great deal of eastern style bumps. But I appreciate others' impressions as technology evolves. I'm hopeful I'll like Soul 7-s in soft bumps and powder and bump conditions (and hopeful there will be a lot of that this year).
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post
 
 

I much, much preferred the 94 in the bumps.  Less sidecut, not nearly as stiff.  Much more forgiving.  But I've seen people (better skiers than me!) slay horrible, icy bumps on skis like the Contacts (Fischer Progressor 9, Head SuperShape, etc.) too.

 

 

 

I'm with Matthias and DesiredUsername here. The last thing I want in bumps is a stiff, quickly-tapering, slalom-y tip that's purposely designed to hook up instantly when on edge and yank you around the turn without letting go. My preference anyway.

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

Dynastar contact cross ti 172cm: seem a little stiff and very heavy but quick edge to edge

Fischer Watea 94 178cm: much lighter, not as stiff, but longer turning radius

or....

I have an old pair of Olin DTSL 181cm (the yellow ones maybe 1996?) prob 60mm at waist 90mm at tip or so. I haven't skied them in over 5 years and I've improved significantly since then. I pulled them out of the garage to have a looksy and they are super light and seem pretty flexible at the tip in comparison to the others so I got thinkin they may make decent bump skis. I'm not zipperlining or anything close but I do enjoy trying to make my way down medium sized moguls on a moderate pitch.

 

Thoughts please??? thnks

Agreen


If you have correctly described you skis, then the best "bump" ski in that lot is a toss up between the Dynastar, which although too stiff for bumps and too shaped is more forgiving because it is shorter, and the Olin, which is softer.  Assuming you have a bit of skill and practice the Olin will become the better bump ski for you; all it takes is a little practice and you will be doing the zipper line.

post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


If you have correctly described you skis, then the best "bump" ski in that lot is a toss up between the Dynastar, which although too stiff for bumps and too shaped is more forgiving because it is shorter, and the Olin, which is softer.  Assuming you have a bit of skill and practice the Olin will become the better bump ski for you; all it takes is a little practice and you will be doing the zipper line.

 

Do you think weight has any bearing in this matter? Because I swear those Dynastars feel like a ton-o-bricks (which I think is due to the integrated look system and metal in ski?). They sure don't chatter on hard pack though and I haven't found a speed limit.  I'm far from an expert bump skier so I make a lot of correction moves and "oh crap!!!" moves whilst working on my absorption skill set.

post #22 of 27
Personally, I prefer the lightest ski I can find in bumps. There are so many changes in direction happening so quickly and the weight resists this movement. I want my skis to move to where I want them.
My favorite bump skis are Goode 74s - super light. For hard bumps I like Volkl Race Tigers SL - not physically all that light but a very light feel on the snow. For those powder cut up bumps, Praxis Backcountry - physically light but quite stable.
Get some new skis!
Eric
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


If you have correctly described you skis, then the best "bump" ski in that lot is a toss up between the Dynastar, which although too stiff for bumps and too shaped is more forgiving because it is shorter, and the Olin, which is softer.  Assuming you have a bit of skill and practice the Olin will become the better bump ski for you; all it takes is a little practice and you will be doing the zipper line.

 

Do you think weight has any bearing in this matter? Because I swear those Dynastars feel like a ton-o-bricks (which I think is due to the integrated look system and metal in ski?). They sure don't chatter on hard pack though and I haven't found a speed limit.  I'm far from an expert bump skier so I make a lot of correction moves and "oh crap!!!" moves whilst working on my absorption skill set.


Yes, weight matters.  It matters even more if you are making correction moves with your skis in the air, trying to keep up when you get going too fast.  BTW, I suck at bumps, so I've made a lot of those, despite my relative lack of experience in real bumps. :o 

post #24 of 27
Ditch the Olin DTSL. If the binding is as old as the ski the binding is probably no longer indemnified.

Full rocker wood core skis are excellent in the bumps. The Volkl Bridge is a great choice. Very maneuverable and light and lively. Try the Volkl Kink if for a snappy feel due to the camber but with tip and tail rocker. All the major manufacturers have something similar to both skis.
post #25 of 27

Want a tip from a freaq?

 

I agree with cr that the Olins most closely fit the description of a competition bump ski.  Also agree with tball that if you're not trying to do zippers, straight skinny skis lose a lot of their value.

 

Here's what I'm posting to tell you though:  Every time I read a review of the Soul 7s they sound remarkably similar to my Bluehouse Maestros which are my very fave all time bump ski.  Well......ya know.... other than my competition bump ski =)

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
 

Want a tip from a freaq?

 

I agree with cr that the Olins most closely fit the description of a competition bump ski.  Also agree with tball that if you're not trying to do zippers, straight skinny skis lose a lot of their value.

 

Here's what I'm posting to tell you though:  Every time I read a review of the Soul 7s they sound remarkably similar to my Bluehouse Maestros which are my very fave all time bump ski.  Well......ya know.... other than my competition bump ski =)

Makes sense to me based on characteristics so interesting about the Maestros.

post #27 of 27
Quote:
 Do you think weight has any bearing in this matter? Because I swear those Dynastars feel like a ton-o-bricks (which I think is due to the integrated look system and metal in ski?).

 

It's not you.  My Contact LTDs weigh a ton.  Dual titanal layers and integrated bindings will do that...

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