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You Don't Need To Stone Grind Skis. Here is another option. - Page 8

post #211 of 218
post #212 of 218

Hey Jaques, using your ideas and technique, I revived my old skis. Thanks,
Lee
post #213 of 218
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leeroy151 View Post


Bottom ski just got base scraped, top ski waiting for my arms to work again.


Hella fantastic job!  Good structure for normal to wet snow!  I like much!

post #214 of 218
Thread Starter 

Ski season is coming soon the the northern hemisphere.  Now is the time to do this if you have a burnt base,
 

Then keep the ski waxed well to avoid burn.  Hard wax alone will not prevent burn.  Key is to use softest wax to prepare, and then move to harder waxes.  Hard waxes and fluoro from fluorocarbon waxes stay at the surface and are quickly worn away.

 

Once worn away one must have the deeper saturation of a softer wax underneath so the ski won't burn.  Sure, the ski may slow in glide a bit, but it won't burn so easy.

 

Hard waxes adhere better when they have a base of softer waxes below.  Below may only be a few microns, but it makes all the difference.

 

I use Dominator Base Renew waxes first for preparation, then go harder and harder depending on the snow temperatures where I ski.

post #215 of 218
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post
 

That's some real skilled old school stuff.

There was an old Austrian guy that tuned skis 30 years ago at Boyne.

He knew his art and tuned for Othmar Schneider and others.

His skis were usually tuned convex in the tip and concave in the tail by use of a flexible metal scraper.

Structure was imparted through use of a riller tool.

It took him about a day of work to perfect an off the shelf wood race ski.

Not happening here.....


Looking back you funny!  It did happen here!  :beercheer:

post #216 of 218
Jacques, this method has kept my wife's skis in pretty good shape for the last three years, but now I went ahead and took them to the shop for a stone grind, wax, and to have the edges professionally reset to 1 and 3 degrees. Just reached the limit of what I want to attempt in my man cave downstairs. I'm fine doing maintenance work, but a major base reset is beyond me at this point on my learning curve. My newish skis from last year (1 and 2 degrees) and the brand new set downstairs (1 and 3 degrees) are fine for now. My son beats the hell out of his twin tips in the park and in the eastern trees, so I just try to do the best I can to maintain clean bases and reasonably sharp edges. Everything gets several Renew treatments this fall before I apply hard wax for our first trip. Let's hope that's sooner rather than later.
post #217 of 218
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post

Jacques, this method has kept my wife's skis in pretty good shape for the last three years, but now I went ahead and took them to the shop for a stone grind, wax, and to have the edges professionally reset to 1 and 3 degrees. Just reached the limit of what I want to attempt in my man cave downstairs. I'm fine doing maintenance work, but a major base reset is beyond me at this point on my learning curve. My newish skis from last year (1 and 2 degrees) and the brand new set downstairs (1 and 3 degrees) are fine for now. My son beats the hell out of his twin tips in the park and in the eastern trees, so I just try to do the best I can to maintain clean bases and reasonably sharp edges. Everything gets several Renew treatments this fall before I apply hard wax for our first trip. Let's hope that's sooner rather than later.


Right on.  As you know after so many scrapings and or grinds the ski will eventually be toast.  Because I am a feather weight I can enjoy a old ski more than heavy weights.  A soft ski is okay for me. 

Three years is awesome.  The scraping method is awesome for when one wants to postpone a actual run through a grinder.

Take care and pray for PNW snow above 5,000 feet.  Don't pray for below that level or i will have too much work to do!
I'm at 4,300 give or take.  Sometimes it's a hassle.

 

post #218 of 218
Thread Starter 

The video here has over 20,700 hits now.  57 likes and 7 dislikes.  

 

The trick is not to use a steel scraper that is TOO SHARP.   Needs to cut base off, but just a little at a time.

 

I have not base ground a ski in over 13 years now.  This method creates a base that runs with much less breaking-in that a stone grind.

 

I'm still using the skis from the video and they are running like a champion.  :beercheer:  Jacques

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