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What do you think if skis will become like these?

post #1 of 216
Thread Starter 

CFTiWood skis is a design project based on forces inside the ski. I'm building my first tester.. what do u think about?

 

http://www.filippocima.com/#!cftiwood-skis/c21ta

post #2 of 216

Seen my share of split tails and a few hollow body products advertised over the years.  Never seen any do very well in the marketplace though.  Hexel probably sold more than the rest all combined and I'd guess they didn't sell more than 20,000 pairs total.

post #3 of 216
Thread Starter 

Hyes u r right. I tried to base everything on an interior force study.

Hexcel? do u mean the carbon fiber producer?

post #4 of 216

They produced skis in the 70s and early 80s.

post #5 of 216

 I think they will be slow with those  giant holes in the middle of the running surface.  they will drag and catch and be very hard to slip sideways.  they will also probably shoot snow into your face and have reduced float in the soft stuff.

post #6 of 216

Very pretty skis, but the design seems to be more tuned to visual pleasure than snow functionality.   These are being designed by Filippo Cima, a yacht designer.  

Yes, the holes in the shovel will grab and hold onto snow.  Can you imagine?

Torsional strength in the tail stops close the the bindings; there can't be any edge grip in that split tail once the ski is up on edge.  

Is that a binding plate on there?  What's it made of, wood?

I love looking at these but I am very suspicious of how functional they will be on snow.  

post #7 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by royal View Post
 

 I think they will be slow with those  giant holes in the middle of the running surface.  they will drag and catch and be very hard to slip sideways.  they will also probably shoot snow into your face and have reduced float in the soft stuff.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Very pretty skis, but the design seems to be more tuned to visual pleasure than snow functionality.  

Yes, the holes in the shovel will grab and hold onto snow.  Can you imagine?

 

Of course, that is all trivially fixed by covering the holes with tensioned plastic.    Plastic that might closely resemble base material.   :)

post #8 of 216
My thought was, does this guy ski?
post #9 of 216

.......


Edited by LiquidFeet - 10/26/13 at 9:10am
post #10 of 216

If I had these last week on the Glacier in Hintertux, skiing on grey ice in the mornings, they would now be in pieces - many pieces...

post #11 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fil49er View Post

CFTiWood skis is a design project based on forces inside the ski. I'm building my first tester.. what do u think about?

http://www.filippocima.com/#!cftiwood-skis/c21ta

I think, as others have mentioned, that you need a contiguous surface in contact with the snow. For your general information, take a look at the new Volkl Katana V-works for something on the edge of ski design. It's one take on matching material with structure for function. Back to Mies; form follows function. Skis function in ' frozen hydrology'... You've essentially made a boat with holes in the hull. Take it skiing for sure though! Nothing gets accomplished if you don't try. Your first effort is exactly that... the first. Hopefully it's only a first iteration. smile.gif
post #12 of 216

It is all very pretty, but totally theoretical.  You can design a ski inside on a computer, but the range of terrain and snow conditions in which a ski needs to work effectively is limitless.  These things look like they might work on groomed, but that's about it.  The pointy swallow tails would be useless in anything else.  I'll take a serious look at them when they actually get them out in the snow and we can see if they "ski."  At this point they do not appear to have a relationship to a useful snow tool, but the proof is in the pudding, so we'll see.

post #13 of 216
The guy needs to ski them himself first, and not on some packed bowling alley groomer. He should have someone video taping so we can watch on You Tube.
post #14 of 216

I'll reiterate; they are beautiful.  That counts for something.  

But do they ski?  At first glance, they do not look like they will ski very well because of the holes and the deep swallowtail.

Those holes and that deep swallowtail are a big part of why they are so lovely.

 

Skiing is an athletic endeavor which is "inherently dangerous."

Skis need to function well first to provide safe fun for their users.

Then they can get as visually stunning as the designer can make them.

 

Prove us doubters wrong, and they will be very popular!

post #15 of 216
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

They produced skis in the 70s and early 80s.

Thank you.. this is very interesting. They are very good, top quality, carbon fiber producer! thank u :-)

post #16 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The guy needs to ski them himself first, and not on some packed bowling alley groomer. He should have someone video taping so we can watch on You Tube.

 

Just in case "the guy" is reading this thread, I would be happy to ski a pair if he'd send me some.  I'll video everything for the world to see!

 

I'm skeptical of them. But I was skeptical of fat skis, so what do I know?

post #17 of 216
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Very pretty skis, but the design seems to be more tuned to visual pleasure than snow functionality.   These are being designed by Filippo Cima, a yacht designer.  

Yes, the holes in the shovel will grab and hold onto snow.  Can you imagine?

Torsional strength in the tail stops close the the bindings; there can't be any edge grip in that split tail once the ski is up on edge.  

Is that a binding plate on there?  What's it made of, wood?

I love looking at these but I am very suspicious of how functional they will be on snow.  

ahahahah.. yes u r right! I'm a yacht designer but I like to experiment other field, expecially where my passions are.

Yes they will be for hard snow slopes but I think to control the torsional problem by the crossing bridge.

You r also right for the tail.. thank u to ur comments, also on other posts, I will add another crossing bridge near the end :-)

post #18 of 216
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

My thought was, does this guy ski?

Yes, I like a lot ;-)

post #19 of 216
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The guy needs to ski them himself first, and not on some packed bowling alley groomer. He should have someone video taping so we can watch on You Tube.

Yes of course.. I'm going to build them.. I hope to star soon. For the first model I will start from an existing pair.. doing holes, creating different thikness and carbon fiber cover.

I will post all the material for sure 

post #20 of 216

Maybe he can race the heartcarver guy.

post #21 of 216
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

I'll reiterate; they are beautiful.  That counts for something.  

But do they ski?  At first glance, they do not look like they will ski very well because of the holes and the deep swallowtail.

Those holes and that deep swallowtail are a big part of why they are so lovely.

 

Skiing is an athletic endeavor which is "inherently dangerous."

Skis need to function well first to provide safe fun for their users.

Then they can get as visually stunning as the designer can make them.

 

Prove us doubters wrong, and they will be very popular!

Yes.. I agree a lot with u. They must be safe for first. My swallow tail is too dangerous.. I will modify a bit! I promise..

 

And Yes.. Bob I'm following the post ;-)

I'm sorry but I'm working also on another project, a boat this time :-) , and I'm testing a my project (hoping in the wind) http://www.filippocima.com/#!tandem-moth/c7ne

I'm sorry but I will reply at every comment.. I like this forum

post #22 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fil49er View Post

 

http://www.filippocima.com/#!cftiwood-skis/c21ta

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fil49er View Post
 

 http://www.filippocima.com/#!tandem-moth/c7ne

 

 

For you designs to be taken seriously, you may want to consider using a professional service to translate your thoughts into English, which I presume is not your native language. This may just be my point of view, but I believe the quality of the communication reflects the quality of the work. I am taken by the beauty of your designs, but put off by the grammatical mistakes and spelling errors.

post #23 of 216
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 

 

 

 

For you designs to be taken seriously, you may want to consider using a professional service to translate your thoughts into English, which I presume is not your native language. This may just be my point of view, but I believe the quality of the communication reflects the quality of the work. I am taken by the beauty of your designs, but put off by the grammatical mistakes and spelling errors.

thank u for the suggestion man :-) I will do something..

In any case I'm Italian

post #24 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fil49er View Post

 

http://www.filippocima.com/#!cftiwood-skis/c21ta

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fil49er View Post
 

 http://www.filippocima.com/#!tandem-moth/c7ne

 

 

For you designs to be taken seriously, you may want to consider using a professional service to translate your thoughts into English, which I presume is not your native language. This may just be my point of view, but I believe the quality of the communication reflects the quality of the work. I am taken by the beauty of your designs, but put off by the grammatical mistakes and spelling errors.

 

Let he who is without grammatical and spelling errors cast the first stone.  FWIW it isn't you.

post #25 of 216
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

 

Let he who is without grammatical and spelling errors cast the first stone.  FWIW it isn't you.

:-).. Probably mine is a rock :-)

post #26 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post



For you designs to be taken seriously, you may want to consider using a professional service to translate your thoughts into English, which I presume is not your native language. This may just be my point of view, but I believe the quality of the communication reflects the quality of the work. I am taken by the beauty of your designs, but put off by the grammatical mistakes and spelling errors.

Plenty of great designers don't speak or write English fluently. That includes Pritzker prize winners. Chill.
post #27 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

Let he who is without grammatical and spelling errors cast the first stone.  FWIW it isn't you.

It isn't me either, but if you're going to put up a web site that uses very improper English, then you should do something about it before you ask a bunch of English speakers on an English only web site to take a look at it.  Even small mistakes tell the reader that you're stupid or lazy, or both and if you're trying to sell something it drives away customers.  It's not pretty or nice, but it's the truth.


Edited by Posaune - 10/26/13 at 11:35pm
post #28 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

 

Let he who is without grammatical and spelling errors cast the first stone.  FWIW it isn't you.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


Plenty of great designers don't speak or write English fluently. That includes Pritzker prize winners. Chill.

 

I felt I broached the subject respectfully and politely. I also took the time to pay a sincere compliment. More than can be said of the poster who derisively compared him to Heart Carver.

 

You can be a great designer, but will have trouble getting your ideas to fruition if people don't take you seriously. No one buys a product in a cheap wrapper and expects to find quality inside. He is here, after all, seeking opinions. This is an easy fix that will help his project move forwards.

post #29 of 216
Thread Starter 

Guys.. I'm not telling nothing to MrGolfAnalogy. He is right and his suggestion is sincere and true.. so thank you. I need time to correct it.. I will do that asap.

If someone native english is thinking to help me we can find a compromise.

 

Now by now I modified the tail.. http://www.filippocima.com/#!cftiwood-modified/c851

post #30 of 216
What's the material? They look flimsy, but I'm mentally used to what normal skis look like. For instance, is there just air between the yellow tip and the foot plate? No running surface? Or is that white paint? If that's air, you're going to be cutting into the snow surface, which is not flat where I ski, essentially braking even before you get going. Skis need a full base to ride on top of the snow, otherwise you're slowing yourself down. Would you leave sharp holes in the hull of a boat? Even catamarans, where their cross sections are between the two hulls (I'm not a boater) keep the cross section ABOVE the waterline, not cutting into the water. They are significantly above. You don't have that kind of room here to keep those cross sections above the snow surface. The base does that. For that matter, what IS the base? And what is the structure? There are huge forces at work when you ski that require strength and flexibility so the ski can resist impacts without breaking. Are you using some new material for this support system or is it essentially twigs?

I feel like you don't understand how skis work. And you are not even applying your boat knowledge to the problem. How long have you skied, where do you ski, how many days a year?

In the tab on the page, you've misspelled industrial.
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