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Quadriceps need strength/endurance, they're burning!

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I'm a boarder, and one with pretty short legs...the result of which, my 'suspension travel' is fairly short for absorbing bumps! Off piste, a lot of riding is done with weight on your back leg, this combined with heavy landings or drops, as well as tracked out, bumpy crud has my legs unable to function after about the 2nd day skiing!

I'm a pretty fit guy, I play soccer competitively for my local team, race motocross, and cycle quite a bit, so I can't nail it down to lack of work in the gym? Or does skiing/boarding just work you differently?

Last Xmas I got two days boarding at Whistler(50cm pow day, woot woot) then took a week off, ate lots of Xmas food and then hit Revelstoke for a few days, then came home and spent the usual week skiing in the French Alps. So I guess Canada was sort of my training. This year though, I'll just be jumping straight into a week in France, so have to be ready to roll!
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellracing View Post

I'm a boarder, and one with pretty short legs...the result of which, my 'suspension travel' is fairly short for absorbing bumps! Off piste, a lot of riding is done with weight on your back leg, this combined with heavy landings or drops, as well as tracked out, bumpy crud has my legs unable to function after about the 2nd day skiing!

I'm a pretty fit guy, I play soccer competitively for my local team, race motocross, and cycle quite a bit, so I can't nail it down to lack of work in the gym? Or does skiing/boarding just work you differently?

Last Xmas I got two days boarding at Whistler(50cm pow day, woot woot) then took a week off, ate lots of Xmas food and then hit Revelstoke for a few days, then came home and spent the usual week skiing in the French Alps. So I guess Canada was sort of my training. This year though, I'll just be jumping straight into a week in France, so have to be ready to roll!

 

I'm not sure what the point of this post is as to contribute anything about your quad strength, but I will say I am suspicious of an Irishman calling the sport soccer. ;)

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
I know those North American dwellers would get confused if I called it football...and in some parts of Ireland, football even means Gaelic football, a completely different sport.

I may have missed the point, but I meant to basically ask was there any tips that anyone has to get the quads ready for skiing/boarding other than just spending time on the hill?
post #4 of 10

Maybe work some wall squats into your exercise routine. You may want to check out our "What no football (soccer) fans?" thread btw. 

post #5 of 10

Sounds like you have the conditioning side mostly covered (football and cycling), so work on building absolute strength by doing the basic barbell lifts (squat, deadlift, bench press, overhead press) for low reps with heavy weight in the gym. Also consider using light weights in a conditioning circuit (dumbbells), which will get your body used to dealing with movement/stress at peak heart rate (football covers some of this with the sprinting).

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post

Sounds like you have the conditioning side mostly covered (football and cycling), so work on building absolute strength by doing the basic barbell lifts (squat, deadlift, bench press, overhead press) for low reps with heavy weight in the gym. Also consider using light weights in a conditioning circuit (dumbbells), which will get your body used to dealing with movement/stress at peak heart rate (football covers some of this with the sprinting).

Yeah, thing is though, I'm the kind of guy who can just go to the gym, without being there for 6 months and just go squat and deadlift 220lbs for ten, no problem. The problem seems to be the recovery, gets worse as the week goes on...

I think I'll maybe try just squatting for 25-30 reps to build endurance, maybe throw in a little hill climbing cycling.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellracing View Post

... Off piste, a lot of riding is done with weight on your back leg...

This is a technique issue, similar to a skier saying that skiing 3d snow requires leaning back to keep the tips of the skis up and so is hard on the quads.  It was never true for skiing or snowboarding, but is even less true now with modern shapes.

 

Because you're heading straight to a ski week, changing bad technique is tough, though.  Psychologically, you already know the feeling from motocross of being in a forward, athletic riding position as opposed to being in the backseat, there.  Snowboarding's not too different, but a lesson or two focused on this could help, a lot.

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

This is a technique issue, similar to a skier saying that skiing 3d snow requires leaning back to keep the tips of the skis up and so is hard on the quads.  It was never true for skiing or snowboarding, but is even less true now with modern shapes.

Because you're heading straight to a ski week, changing bad technique is tough, though.  Psychologically, you already know the feeling from motocross of being in a forward, athletic riding position as opposed to being in the backseat, there.  Snowboarding's not too different, but a lesson or two focused on this could help, a lot.
I get what you mean, in powder your first instinct when learning is to lean back a lot, I was aware of this my first few days! Since then though I have changed to a lot more central, charging, aggressive style. What I meant really was that over pillows, jumps, hops etc or chopped out terrain, you are going to be landing a little more rear biased. You can't land equal weight or your nose is going to hit the next lump of crud or dig into the powder. Also when turning aggressively in powder I tend to bank into the turn and then push hard with my rear leg? Especially on steep faces...
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellracing View Post


I get what you mean, in powder your first instinct when learning is to lean back a lot, I was aware of this my first few days! Since then though I have changed to a lot more central, charging, aggressive style. What I meant really was that over pillows, jumps, hops etc or chopped out terrain, you are going to be landing a little more rear biased. You can't land equal weight or your nose is going to hit the next lump of crud or dig into the powder. Also when turning aggressively in powder I tend to bank into the turn and then push hard with my rear leg? Especially on steep faces...

You're still describing several technique issues more than strength endurance issues.  Some of what you're describing gets harder to get rid of the more it's grooved, so at some point you'd do well to find a freeriding camp of some sort that can help with technique.  Whistler, Jackson, Snowbird, etc. all have very good options.

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

You're still describing several technique issues more than strength endurance issues.  Some of what you're describing gets harder to get rid of the more it's grooved, so at some point you'd do well to find a freeriding camp of some sort that can help with technique.  Whistler, Jackson, Snowbird, etc. all have very good options.

Shall have to see how it goes this year after a little more gym work, maybe a day with an instructor/guide! Haha for me, from Ireland, Whistler isn't so local... Thankfully I've a tonne of relatives nearby! Thinking of switching back to skis this year though, that'll bring on a whole new range of possible technique problems! I skiied all my life up until about 14, but it was all piste/carving/moguls. None of this freestyle business!
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