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Strong Intermediate Skis?? - Page 2

post #31 of 43
Thread Starter 

Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post  My friend, you are beyond words!!!  I've never seen, much less for my benefit, such attention to detail in helping a total stranger, you are one of the good people on earth, bless you!  I hope i can reciprocate some day, maybe spanish lessons:beercheer:....!  GRACIAS.
 

Gpaulski, glad you are planning on taking some lessons.  Lessons can help you manage speed more appropriately, keep up with your son, give you more control when you ski on longer skis, and those longer skis will help you handle speed and variable conditions with more control.  Here are some specifics to ask for when you take your lesson.  From your videos I've taken some screen shots.

 

 

4.  Nice pic below!  You are initiating a turn with a release of the old outside ski; that leg is

flexed and your body is toppling in the direction of the new turn.  Your new inside arm and

shoulder are advanced; your new outside leg is extending.  You have a long leg and a short

leg.  All of this is really good!

  

Your instructor will be better able to see what happens between this strong initiation and 

the rest of the turn that leads to skiing square, leaning in, and being crouched and aft.  

Hang onto this good stuff and replace the other movement patterns described above

with new, more functional movement patterns, and you'll find that longer skis will feel better

than those 150cm shorties you are currently on.  Everything will feel better!

 

 

If summarizing, I'd say my major flaw (not the only one...) is STANCE, and using my upper body way, way too much.  I should be using my legs and skis much, much more. Concur?

 

Then not only technique and "ugliness" will improve, but I'll finally enjoy bowls, powder, and maybe even small moguls, wow!

 

Much obliged.

post #32 of 43

I would say stance is the most common problem I see in anyone less than an advanced skier.  If you're been skiing very long it will take some time to fix it.  It took me about 4 years, but I had been skiing more than 40 years by that time.

post #33 of 43

Agreed with all above. You ski intermediate runs but you will need to take several lessons to advance to an intermediate level skier. As others have pointed out, you don't really ski as much as you basically skid from side to side to slow yourself down, much like a person on snow blades. This is fine on short skis but you need to learn technique to be able to actual ski your short or properly sized skis. With proper technique, longer skis are more stable in powder and at speed.

 

Also, I'm so impressed with the screen shots people took. It's so easy to see that you're leaning back and muscling the skis down the hill. Very tiring. A few days of private lessons (if possible) will do wonders for you in terms of fun on the snow. Make sure to take lessons on a properly sized ski. As far as moguls, powder and other variable terrain, if your technique is good, it really doesn't matter what you're sliding over other than being able to absorb a little more. Riding in the back seat like you do though means that your legs are locked in that position and any little imperfection in the snow will throw you off balance as I'm sure it does.

post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigr View Post

I would like to add another perspective. As you get older, correct technique becomes very important if you want to keep skiing safely.
 

This with a bullet. Falling awkwardly once you're middle aged not only hurts more, it's more likely to put you in the E.R. Take a bunch of lessons, rent some different skis using advice from your instructor, then revisit the "What ski should I buy" theme. 

post #35 of 43

I'm also seeing a lack of a pole plant in any turn, and really it seems like the upper body is along for the ride.

 

The pivot/skid turn is why you struggle in powder and moguls (which sounds like you struggle on anything ungroomed). When there is stuff to catch the tip and tails, skid turns don't work.

 

I think an intermediate's money is better spent towards lessons than skis. Learning how to use the equipment often completely changes ones preference for the equipment.

 

Enjoy the lessons, and props for having thick skin- a lot of people don't take well to being told they aren't as good as they thought they were.

post #36 of 43

Gpaulski:

 

 

If I were you, I would book that lesson for the very first day of your ski season.  One of the issues with poor technique is that it gets so deeply ingrained that it is hard to get rid off.  Not only do you have to learn what to do right, but you also have to "unlearn" what you do wrong.  Your muscles have now had a rest from skiing.  Before you start making those wrong moves that your muscles have memorized from past years of poor skiing, take a private or semi-private lesson and give them a fresh start.

 

Equipment cannot fix technical problems.  Remember the four "T" rule:  there are four factors that determine your performance level in any sport:  talent, tools, technique and training. Talent, you can do nothing about.  Tools cost a lot of money and have little effect on performance.  Learn the proper technique and train!  In other words, take lessons from a competent instructor and practice!

post #37 of 43

I found the videos and the analysis in this thread very interesting and hopefully very helpful. Is there anywhere on Epicski or somewhere else where I can find more examples of videos and analyses of intermediate and advanced skiers? I looked around but couldn't find anything at first glance..

post #38 of 43
Try here, anything with MA in the title. http://epicski.onthesnow.com/f/9/ski-instruction-coaching

But, really, it's all over the forums. Might be able to search for MA, but being that's just two letters, it'll produce a lot of slop. Might try searching for "movement analysis".
post #39 of 43

awesome. thanks for the tip! 

post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by itpski View Post
 

I found the videos and the analysis in this thread very interesting and hopefully very helpful. Is there anywhere on Epicski or somewhere else where I can find more examples of videos and analyses of intermediate and advanced skiers? I looked around but couldn't find anything at first glance..

 

You can search threads asking for feedback here and will find a bunch. I recently opened up the floodgates posting about double pole plants.

post #41 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by itpski View Post
 

I found the videos and the analysis in this thread very interesting and hopefully very helpful. Is there anywhere on Epicski or somewhere else where I can find more examples of videos and analyses of intermediate and advanced skiers? I looked around but couldn't find anything at first glance..

I collected together a few MA threads more relevant to intermediates and aspiring advanced skiers in the Beginner Zone.  Many of the Beginner threads are actually more for intermediates than pure novices in the first season or two.

 

http://epicski.onthesnow.com/t/115961/how-to-get-advice-from-instructors-based-on-a-video-of-yourself

post #42 of 43

thanks, marcznc! you've just given me a week's worth of reading/watching. lol. maybe i'll try to make a video too sometime this winter..

post #43 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacobillie View Post
 

Gpaulski:

 

 

If I were you, I would book that lesson for the very first day of your ski season.  One of the issues with poor technique is that it gets so deeply ingrained that it is hard to get rid off.  Not only do you have to learn what to do right, but you also have to "unlearn" what you do wrong.  Your muscles have now had a rest from skiing.  Before you start making those wrong moves that your muscles have memorized from past years of poor skiing, take a private or semi-private lesson and give them a fresh start.

 

Equipment cannot fix technical problems.  Remember the four "T" rule:  there are four factors that determine your performance level in any sport:  talent, tools, technique and training. Talent, you can do nothing about.  Tools cost a lot of money and have little effect on performance.  Learn the proper technique and train!  In other words, take lessons from a competent instructor and practice!


Yessum, exactly the plan!!!  Just deciding first day between Brighton, Snowbird or Alta.  Gracias!

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