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I've become a "pussy" after injury - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Yeah, chronic pain won't last past the day you kill yourself or start popping pills and spend all your time zoned out.

I had an OT tell me pain is only a sensation, learn not to fear the sensation. Yeah? Bull. At least she also gave me little steps to start moving back into doing.

Really, give the woman some steps to get over the hump, don't give people sermons like you're Yoda. She's going to get more value out of doing drills that are non-threatening and succeeding at those drills while moving towards more confident control. That in turn will get her across the ice. The head thing will resolve itself with time and experience. You telling her what to think will not, especially if it's clearly some platitude.
post #32 of 49
As a mountain biker and skier I hear where you are coming from. I think you can approach this by doing a few simple things.

First, I would start working on a training program to improve your fitness. Strength and fitness on the hill will add confidence and improve response.

Second, I would find an instructor, a good one, explain the situation and get some objective analysis of what is going on.

Third, if there is nothing wrong with the skis you are on, starting slow and easy, as has been pointed out is a great idea.

Having had some pretty good crashes on the bike even this season, I understand your dilemma. Getting fit, deciding you are going to do it, and trusting in your own long experience will go a long way to getting back on the mountain. Some instruction will more than likely identify the issue and provide a solution.

Dont give up. It can be overcome.
post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Yeah, chronic pain won't last past the day you kill yourself or start popping pills and spend all your time zoned out.

I had an OT tell me pain is only a sensation, learn not to fear the sensation. Yeah? Bull. At least she also gave me little steps to start moving back into doing.

Really, give the woman some steps to get over the hump, don't give people sermons like you're Yoda. She's going to get more value out of doing drills that are non-threatening and succeeding at those drills while moving towards more confident control. That in turn will get her across the ice. The head thing will resolve itself with time and experience. You telling her what to think will not, especially if it's clearly some platitude.

You have issues obviously,,   And yes, on occasions pain is mental. 

 

Anyways, getting people to understand fear is the first step.   It's not like I made this up, this is what we teach our athletes, this is what were learned from high level coaches and clinicians,,,,    Getting someone to understand and make a decision is pretty beneficial... It seeds desire... Desire overcomes just about anything... 

Best Regards,

Yoda 

post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiddy View Post
 

You have issues obviously,,   And yes, on occasions pain is mental.

 

Anyways, getting people to understand fear is the first step.   It's not like I made this up, this is what we teach our athletes, this is what were learned from high level coaches and clinicians,,,,    Getting someone to understand and make a decision is pretty beneficial... It seeds desire... Desire overcomes just about anything...

Best Regards,

Yoda

Hey Yoda, :)

 

In all seriousness, some of the stuff you work with, specifically, does have real carryover to snow. E.g., succumbing to fear feeds on itself, while moving towards doing the thing that is scary makes the fear subside.  So, there are positive and negative feedbacks.

 

Do you also give your athletes specific movement thoughts -- in skiing terms, this might be feel shin pressure, or weight over outside ski -- at certain points to keep them task-focused and disciplined in thought, rather than letting distracted thought and fear overwhelm them?  Does visualization of a routine or technique help -- or, on-snow, visualization of skiing in a certain way over a section of a run?

post #35 of 49

Check out this book.  It's a great read, and addresses your issue directly.  The author discusses all kinds of issues related to fear that will help you understand how your fear is functioning.  Plus, there are many head drills in it to help you overcome the negative effects of that voice that keeps telling you "No you shouldn't do that - you'll fail!'

Mermer has a great approach, and knows skiing intimately.  

 41YPMWDYTCL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg 

post #36 of 49
Poor Annette hasn't been back..
post #37 of 49

I think the OP's reaction to steep, icy trails is a common in the ski community, regardless of prior injury or not. I can offer a number of situations where I was on a very icy trail and felt the anxiety she describes.  At last year's Big Sky Gathering there were a few stories about some very competent skiers becoming anxious about steep terrain. I've struggled with fear of height in certain situations, including riding some ski lifts, and, more recently looking down very steep trails such as those at Big Sky. It's easy now to become paralyzed by situations that did not bother me at all just a few years ago.

 

Although not directly related to the topic of icy trail fear, the below article (it's a pdf so it can be saved), regarding fear of height, may be of interest to those, like me, who experience situational anxiety. It's a professional read, although somewhat lengthy, and gives a path for identifying specific situations, then putting a plan together. A key point is that avoiding the situation does not address the problem, we have to face our fears directly via taking small steps.

 

http://www.martinantony.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Overcoming-Height-Phobias1.pdf

post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post
 

I think the OP's reaction to steep, icy trails is a common in the ski community, regardless of prior injury or not. I can offer a number of situations where I was on a very icy trail and felt the anxiety she describes.  At last year's Big Sky Gathering there were a few stories about some very competent skiers becoming anxious about steep terrain. I've struggled with fear of height in certain situations, including riding some ski lifts, and, more recently looking down very steep trails such as those at Big Sky. It's easy now to become paralyzed by situations that did not bother me at all just a few years ago.

 

Although not directly related to the topic of icy trail fear, the below article (it's a pdf so it can be saved), regarding fear of height, may be of interest to those, like me, who experience situational anxiety. It's a professional read, although somewhat lengthy, and gives a path for identifying specific situations, then putting a plan together. A key point is that avoiding the situation does not address the problem, we have to face our fears directly via taking small steps.

 

http://www.martinantony.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Overcoming-Height-Phobias1.pdf


Good read - thanks.  Essentially the PDF describes a cognitive/behavioural approach to overcoming fears - similar to my overly condensed version in post 9 of this thread.  This is an evidence-based approach that works.  It makes sense - avoiding a fearful situation only teaches avoidance. Taking a stepwise and goal directed approach to expose yourself to a fearful situation while also managing those thoughts and beliefs associated with the fear makes it more likely that you will succeed.    

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post
 

At last year's Big Sky Gathering there were a few stories about some very competent skiers becoming anxious about steep terrain.

 

Dude, those weren't stories.

 

Or maybe I'm not very competent. 

 

Either way most of us have been there in one way or another, at one time or another. 

 

My thing is that if this is recreation - even recreation that I'm ambitious about - every step has to build on fun. If it's not fun, I might as well go back to work. And fun means being with friends on the hill who are supporting me and cheering me on because we all just love being out there. If I have those, I have one of the ingredients to taking the next step in my skills. If I don't, I need some new friends.

post #40 of 49

For my knee injury, the ACL failing was essentially a non-event.  What hurt was years later when the meniscus tore while side-slipping past a traffic jam.

So when I visualize skiing steeps, it doesn't bother me.  But think about side-slipping, and my skin crawls.  It will be interesting to see how it plays out this winter.

post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post
 

Hey Yoda, :)

 

In all seriousness, some of the stuff you work with, specifically, does have real carryover to snow. E.g., succumbing to fear feeds on itself, while moving towards doing the thing that is scary makes the fear subside.  So, there are positive and negative feedbacks.

 

Do you also give your athletes specific movement thoughts -- in skiing terms, this might be feel shin pressure, or weight over outside ski -- at certain points to keep them task-focused and disciplined in thought, rather than letting distracted thought and fear overwhelm them?  Does visualization of a routine or technique help -- or, on-snow, visualization of skiing in a certain way over a section of a run?

Yes, 100 percent.  If you can get them to stop thinking about what they are doing incorrect, and start thinking about what they should feel to do it correct, it changes the focus.    We also use video a lot and focus on angles, body shapes etc...   

post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

Dude, those weren't stories.

 

Or maybe I'm not very competent. 

 

 

You mean like when suddenly out of nowhere it goes white-out and you can't even see the bump in front of you?  That was... interesting.  For me, low visibility is much worse than steepness.

post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

 

Dude, those weren't stories.

Or maybe I'm not very competent. 

You mean like when suddenly out of nowhere it goes white-out and you can't even see the bump in front of you?  That was... interesting.  For me, low visibility is much worse than steepness.

You get used to it, just like you get used to any ski condition, by experience. There are tools to help you see better and even lessen the vertigo. Do it enough and each time it's easier.

Same with the OP's ice issues. Start with sharp skis, wide trails of low pitch, and ski them until there's no issue, then ramp it up a bit. Sure, this is a long process, but it is a process. And if you stop worrying about grading yourself and enjoy what you've achieved, you'll eventually get to your goal. The point is to enjoy where you are.
post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post


You get used to it, just like you get used to any ski condition, by experience.

 

Well, it's not such a big deal if I'm familiar with the terrain, but when I'm skiing it for the first time and also can't see where I'm going, that's a bit different.

post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

You get used to it, just like you get used to any ski condition, by experience.

Well, it's not such a big deal if I'm familiar with the terrain, but when I'm skiing it for the first time and also can't see where I'm going, that's a bit different.

Yeah, that happened to me at Snowbird. Was totally turned around, fortunately asked a passing chair to tell me where I was.

A good time to grab a mountain tour. :-)
post #46 of 49

I can relate to what you're going through. My neck was injured pretty badly in a big air comp and I still have issues to this day, but it was very close to being much worse. I ended up quitting skiing for several years and I can honestly say it is my biggest regret. Last season was my first season back on skis and the first few months were really difficult mentally. It took maybe 3 days for my skiing to come back, but I spent months being furious with myself for holding back.One day I just realized that I have always pushed my limits and left everything on the mountain be it sledding, mtb, or skiing. That's who I am, that's how I ski and skiing is what I love. After that it was like a switch went off and I was tearing it up again. There's still work to be done, I've yet to throw anything big in the air, but that's my goal for this season.

 

It's pretty obvious you can ski being a racer and I understand exactly what you're going through. It's incredibly frustrating knowing exactly how easily your body can perform a task but being afraid to do it. Ice and crashes go hand in hand with skiing, you just need to decide if the risk is worth the reward for you. If it is, you need to face your fear. For me the best way is to just do it, but there's some great advice on other methods to try in this thread too. 

 

Hope this helps.

post #47 of 49

I had a bad accident at the end of the 2010-11 season and broke my tibial plateau. The following season I signed up for a level 2 alpine trainer course. One day of the course was about the speed events and we had to set and run a super-G. I was scared as hell at the start, but I bit my teeth together and ran the course. After that I wasn't frightened any more.

 

My recommendation is to get back to racing. Hook up with your local club. There is always room for ex-racers who help out  and you can get a few runs in. It will all come back :-) I also strongly support the posters who have suggested more strength and condition training. It builds mental confidence as well as getting you into better shape.

 

Lycka till!

 

Mark

post #48 of 49

Annette,

I know exactly where you are coming from. After my injury  (destruction of ACL, MCL, meniscus, patella along with tibia plateau and tibia shaft fractures), it took me almost 3 years to get back on the hill. Women have a tendency to be in our own heads too much and overthink everything.  You have to trust your ankle.  It's been supporting you in every other aspect of  your life including going down the hill where there is snow. When you hit an icy patch, take a deep breath and tell yourself that you can do it. I know it sounds simple, and it can be, and it can make all the difference in the world. The only way to get  your confidence back is to conquer your fear. You fell once, and got hurt badly., which sucks, but the odds of you falling are far greater if you panic. 

Just breathe.

You can do it girl!

post #49 of 49
Thread Starter 

Hi all!

 

It's been a while since I posted this post, and it turns out i never sent a reply. I started once or twice, but never pressed "submit". Thank you for so many great responses. I'm sure others than just myself will find great help in them. Seems like I'm not the only one with this problem. 

 

Just to be clear... pain doesn't really bother me that much, it's the not being able to ski for a season, and having to walk on crutches part that bothered me the most. 

 

My strategy to get over the fear of ice this year is simply to avoid ice. I'll only go skiing when it's been dumping snow the night before. Had one of my best weeks of skiing last week, with no ice what so ever. And if I have to ski on ice, I'll get my old racing skis and sharpen the edges. Then maybe next season I'll trust both my skis and my skills, and I'll have forgotten all about ice. Also, I'll go night skiing. Here you don't have drunks in the slope. It's almost always empty, and the slopes are freshly groomed. Also, maybe I should get back to racing. I never thought about ice back then. 

 

Edit: added two sentences.

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