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Trip to lake Tahoe?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

This is my first time to Lake Tahoe, I am going the first week in February with two friends. I have been looking at Youtube videos and ski maps to find some fun terrain. We like steeps, bowls, trees, shoots, and if we can get it powder. I do not care to smash my skies on rocks, as I am the one paying for them, and they hurt when you fall on them. one of the guys is a little timid about dropping the first turn off some thing, but he'll get over it as long as it is not to far of a drop. We are going to, Squaw Valley, Heavenly, and Alpine Meadows as they look like they have the best terrine. What can you guys suggest we ski?

post #2 of 23
Squaw and Alpine are chock full of fun terrain from an easy expert level to moderately insane. Check out the unofficial guides to Squaw (and Alpine) for some suggestions.
post #3 of 23

I would stay on the north shore.  Skip Heavenly and add days at Sugarbowl and Mt. Rose instead.

post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

I would stay on the north shore.  Skip Heavenly and add days at Sugarbowl and Mt. Rose instead.

 +1 on this

post #5 of 23

If you are ok with hiking out a bit, Kirkwood has a lot to offer.

 

I really liked Sugarbowl-great side country.

post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Why? Crowds less?
post #7 of 23
No, smaller resorts=different feel.

IMO, Heavenly is worth a visit if only for the views and trees. Kirkwood is also well worth the visit if you can take a little bit of a drive. Keep in mind that:
A. The shorter route from North Lake to South Lake ( through Emerald Bay) is closed in winter, you have to take a long detour around the Nevada side.
B. Road to Kirkwood goes through a pass and some high country, so if it's stormy, it can take a while. Unless you have a 4wd, bring your chains with you.
C. When it is stormy Squaw and Alpine have crowd problems because they are located right on the Sierra Crest and winds force some of the lifts to shut down. Smaller resorts usually fare better and Northstar becomes an attractive option even with its reputation of being the "Flatstar". It's sheltered from the prevailing winds, so I believe all the lifts keep spinning and the stereotypical Northstar skiers stay home.
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

Why? Crowds less?

 

No, more of a logistics issue.  Alexzn covered it pretty well.   I would pick either north or south shore and then explore it's options.  Trying to do both, you'll just spend too much time in a car.

I just happen to prefer north. 

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys, Ion this trip we will do the North shore and stay in Reno, or Tahoe City. It will be Squaw, Alpine Meadows and Mt. Rose. I have been checking out the trial maps, and looking at Youtube videos, so I think I know the best slopes and areas at them.
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

Thanks guys, Ion this trip we will do the North shore and stay in Reno, or Tahoe City. It will be Squaw, Alpine Meadows and Mt. Rose. I have been checking out the trial maps, and looking at Youtube videos, so I think I know the best slopes and areas at them.

For several days at Squaw/Alpine, much better to stay in Tahoe City if you can.  An hour drive from Reno if not snowing.  If dumping . . . you want to be closer.  Staying in Reno for a night or two at the end of the trip is not only good for skiing Mt. Rose, then you don't have to worry about driving to the airport in the middle of a snowstorm.

 

PM me if you want a VRBO suggestion in Tahoe City that could be good for 3 friends.

 

Have fun!

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

Thanks guys, Ion this trip we will do the North shore and stay in Reno, or Tahoe City. It will be Squaw, Alpine Meadows and Mt. Rose. I have been checking out the trial maps, and looking at Youtube videos, so I think I know the best slopes and areas at them.

Did you ever consider reading unofficial guides here at Epic? Just curious. They are in the top menu right on the front page.
post #12 of 23

I'd just stick around at Squaw and Alpine. Do a couple days at each. Hiking Alpine you will find plenty of pow if it has snowed in the past week or so and hasn't gotten warm. I agree with the other posters saying to stay in North Lake... Heavenly.. .meh. You could get adventurous and get out to Kirkwood for a day.... but really staying at Squaw and Alpine will be super fun and you will find spots you really dig on and lap em. 

 

Squaw runs you should check out: 

KT22 - everywhere...

Broken Arrow area

Hike the Palisades

Corkscrew for some exposure

Red Dog trees off KT if the snow is good are GRRRRRRRRRREAT!

 

Alpine:

Hike Beaver to Estell Bowls

Hike Keyhole

Hike WAY OUT High T, just before Grouse Rock for some steep fun (good snow too don't go to far right)

Cruisers over on Sherwood

 

 

Have fuN!

post #13 of 23

Spend at least one day at Heavenly. That gondola ride is a spectacular view of the lake. If you don't do Heavenly then every time you see pics from there you will regret not going.

 

You do realize Squaw is very steep and not very well suited for timid skiers.

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by shortydude View Post
 

Spend at least one day at Heavenly. That gondola ride is a spectacular view of the lake. If you don't do Heavenly then every time you see pics from there you will regret not going.

 

You do realize Squaw is very steep and not very well suited for timid skiers.

You do realize that there is more to Squaw than than the steeps.  The day I spent there with several intermediates, they had a good time.

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilease View Post

Squaw runs you should check out: 

KT22 - everywhere...

Broken Arrow area

Hike the Palisades

Corkscrew for some exposure

Red Dog trees off KT if the snow is good are GRRRRRRRRRREAT!

True, there is more to Squaw than steeps, although if you are comfortable on steeps you will enjoy it more.   Since you are from Mt. Hood, be aware that the average pitch at Squaw is WAY steeper than most runs on Mt.Hood, same goes to the run gradations.  

 

WRT the suggestions above: KT- yes, but watch where you going, its' surprisingly easy to get into a very gnarly situation.  Broken arrow- only if its a good day.  Lower slopes, mostly southern exposure.  Palisades- Do not go if you are not VERY comfortable on steeps, you mention that one of your guys is timid.  Leave him down below.  The first turn off Palisades is the hardest and the easiest way down would be classified as a double-black on Mt. Hood and more.  Look into the Chimney if you can.  Then you will understand.  Corkscrew- this is bad advice, it is not worth the risk IMO, its not that fun of a run, you need to know where you are going, and if you screw up you may get hurt.  just skip it.  Red Dog trees are great if the snow is bad :-)  In good snow there are better choices off KT, you loose too much vertical getting to those trees.  At the risk of sounding like a broken record- read the unofficial guide here at Epic, then ask questions. 

post #16 of 23

Read the unofficial guide.  The guy who wrote it knows something.

 

There's a point in the movie Ronin where DeNiro's character says "The map is not the terrain".  Well, YouTube is not the terrain, either.  Video can distort things.  I'd suggest trying to hook up with someone who can show you around.  It's often difficult to know from the top of something (a) if you are where you think you want to be, (b) where the line goes beyond what you can see, (c) the key landmarks, and (d) appropriate speed.

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
We have lots of steep runs in Heather Canyon,Clark and in PR, at Mt. Hood Meadows. I have skied at a number of resorts, and all the steep spots they had, the big difference is on Hood you need to be able to handle different snow conditions from top to bottom of the run, it can change in a few feet. We do get the days with deep can’t do any wrong powder, but you have to be ready for anything. If you come to Hood go to Meadows, unless you like flat, then go to Timberline.
I have seen some video where people, kids are skiing areas where their skis are being torn up by the rocks they are skiing over, maybe it is just the bad year we had, and I do not want to rip my boards up. I love steep and have skied a number of places, and I like getting air into a steep slope. The one guy coming with us just started jumping the cornices at the top of runs, but there are ways around some of the stuff he may not like. I will not be going off of the first spot on the Palisades between the big rocks where you go off the cliff and land then go off the next, the rest look fine.
Thanks all for the advice, I thought I would ask and see what the locals had to say, I will be going to the unofficial guide next. Skilease, I Youtubed the spots you listed, all look like fun places, thanks.
Edited by tomfifield - 10/18/13 at 5:55am
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

True, there is more to Squaw than steeps, although if you are comfortable on steeps you will enjoy it more.   Since you are from Mt. Hood, be aware that the average pitch at Squaw is WAY steeper than most runs on Mt.Hood, same goes to the run gradations.  

WRT the suggestions above: KT- yes, but watch where you going, its' surprisingly easy to get into a very gnarly situation.  Broken arrow- only if its a good day.  Lower slopes, mostly southern exposure.  Palisades- Do not go if you are not VERY comfortable on steeps, you mention that one of your guys is timid.  Leave him down below.  The first turn off Palisades is the hardest and the easiest way down would be classified as a double-black on Mt. Hood and more.  Look into the Chimney if you can.  Then you will understand.  Corkscrew- this is bad advice, it is not worth the risk IMO, its not that fun of a run, you need to know where you are going, and if you screw up you may get hurt.  just skip it.  Red Dog trees are great if the snow is bad :-)  In good snow there are better choices off KT, you loose too much vertical getting to those trees.  At the risk of sounding like a broken record- read the unofficial guide here at Epic, then ask questions. 
I will 3rd the unofficial guide link. These guys did a great job putting that together. The north side of the lake will give you your most efficient bang for the buck.
post #19 of 23
Thread Starter 
I read the unofficial guide, and it is full of good information, I want to go to Squaw as I have seen some nice runs, steep, I do not like going some place to find that they do not have the kind of skiing I like.
post #20 of 23

Check out the movie GNAR.  This will show you some terrain at Squaw and Alpine Meadows.  The book SQUALLYWOOD is pretty interesting too.

 

Here's thi link for GNAR

 

http://unofficialnetworks.com/gnar/

post #21 of 23

You can spend your whole trip at just at Squaw, just ask Miles Clark

 

 

 

post #22 of 23

You may also want to throw in Homewood Ski Resort especially if there is powder or a lot of snow. Homewood has some of the prettiest terrain and best view of the lake plus it is hardly ever crowded. Its a nice contrast to Squaw. The terrain isn't as difficult. The tree skiing is really good

post #23 of 23
That is a good option on storm days
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