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Young Skier Looking For Advice On Buying Used Skis - Page 2

post #31 of 41

Consider also if the rental is a season rental, or if you have to waist time in the rental line every time you go skiing.  If it is not a season rental, you are better off buying.  Also, you are much much better off buying boots THAT FIT.  If you have any kind of boot fitter in the area who is better than a total moron, you should buy boots locally and get them adjusted (included in the price), and re-adjusted (also included in the price- make sure you have this included)) to you feet, unless you are incredibly lucky, luck enough to have the shape of foot the companies made thier last from.

 

Someone mentioned a deep snow pack, so those wider skis mentioned above seem like they would fit the profile a little better, BUT I would rather ski any of the first set you presented with well-fitted boots than the latest greatest perfect-for the conditions ski with an ill-fitting boot.

 

Read the Sticky on Boot fitting.

post #32 of 41
Thread Starter 
The I only have 2 real sports shops around, both of them big box stores, so I have no problem doing that to them. But I do see your point, and I wouldn't do that to an actual ski shop.
post #33 of 41
Good reply Ghost.

I personally wouldn't spend big money on boots for a teenager. Younger feet are very flexible. However, come adulthood it's off to the boot fitter.

If you are considering buying boots sight unseen, it would be very worthwhile for you to enquire at your local ski shops and the shops on mountain about their bootfitting capabilities and cost.
I purchased a pair of ex-rentals from a ski shop for my daughter once and they were a bit tight in the width. The ski shop had a shell punch. Problem solved.

Cheers
post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by LtAK View Post

The I only have 2 real sports shops around, both of them big box stores, so I have no problem doing that to them. But I do see your point, and I wouldn't do that to an actual ski shop.

Big box stores. Go for it.
Just don't burn your bridges at a specialist shop. Down the track it will be beneficial to have a relationship with a ski shop. Tuning/repairs/bindings/bootfitting. Etc.
post #35 of 41

I wrote this quick…so up front… try to work around any bad syntax an so forth.

You’re better off at the ‘big box’ rather than buying someone’s old gear who will not take it back. Boots can be tricky to buy on your own, I recently tried to buy boots from the web but ended up sending them back. They took them all back and credited my card back (minus shipping) without hassle and I researched all ,three boots, bought all three at once from the same place, unfortunately I have a little bit odd and somewhat narrow foot (98mm), so none of them fit me, as a new boot should, to allow for later, if needed, adjustment.  I strongly suggest reading the ‘boot fitting forums’ here, I know one of these guys from when I was teaching skiing and would recommend him in a second if you were down here.

 

 You can’t go into one of those big box places without: 1) Minimum, knowing your foot size, and width on EACH foot.  Is your foot wide, normal, or narrow? 2) Checking the technical information on the boots you’re looking at and writing it down and then knowing what the information means and how if effects your foot, level of skiing, and so forth. I suggest trying on at least four or more different brand of boots. You cannot rely on any information the boot seller there gives you, for that matter even someone working at a ski boot shop. With a little studying on your own and the fact that you are feeling the fit you will be better off. A good boot fitter yes, but not the salesman. After you've tried the boots...walk away, study the information on each and se if they match up to your, foot, weight, skiing, and usage.

 

 I recently tried to buy boots from the web but ended up sending them all back. They took them back and credited my card back (minus shipping) without hassle and I researched all ,three boots, bought all three at once from the same place, unfortunately I have a little bit odd and somewhat narrow foot (98mm), so none of them fit me, as a new boot should, to allow for later, if needed, adjustment.  As I said earlier, I was PSIA ski instructor and even with my background and knowledge (such that it is – grin), I failed to find a pair of boots on my own.  That isn’t to say you won’t. It’s just that for me, and the majority of us, it’s not like buying a pair of shoes.

 

IMO do what I did below at your store even though it's not a boot shop.

 

I ended up going to a good shop and trying on four more boots that they suggested, wearing each for 45 minutes to an hour,  so they warmed up to really start feeling the fit then removing and ‘rest’ the feet 15 minutes between, then on  to the next boot. So I tried six different pairs of boots before finding the pair that fit ME as they were supposed to. A boot fitter has an oblation to you to give you the best fit you can get, but YOU also have an obligation to him (and yourself) to do your end of it by being knowledgeable enough to pick out of the selection process a boot he can work with.

post #36 of 41

Sorry that last paragraph... the last sentence should not have been there. It’s good advice just not appropriate there.

 

I see no way to edit after posting...

post #37 of 41
Thread Starter 
It's not a big deal, don't worry. Thanks for the wealth of advice everyone.
post #38 of 41
If it were me, I would wait until I actually went to Aleyeska and go to one of the ski shops in Girdwood to get fitted for boots. They might also have some deals on last years demo or used skis.
post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by scadvice View Post
 

Sorry that last paragraph... the last sentence should not have been there. It’s good advice just not appropriate there.

 

I see no way to edit after posting...

 

In the bottom left corner of "your" post, you should see a little pencil.  Click on that, edit, and hit submit.

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scadvice View Post
 

Sorry that last paragraph... the last sentence should not have been there. It’s good advice just not appropriate there.

 

I see no way to edit after posting...

 

In the bottom left corner of "your" post, you should see a little pencil.  Click on that, edit, and hit submit.

 

L&AirC, I'm not sure that ability to edit your own posts is universal. I'm pretty sure that at one time, at least, it was dependent on having some kind of status, such as being a "passholder" or whatever. I'm sure the mods can comment authoritatively.

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

L&AirC, I'm not sure that ability to edit your own posts is universal. I'm pretty sure that at one time, at least, it was dependent on having some kind of status, such as being a "passholder" or whatever. I'm sure the mods can comment authoritatively.

 

I keep forgetting I'm special :D

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