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Ski Gloves Survey - Page 2

post #31 of 42

The approach of a waterproof shell with adjustable layers inside works very well for your torso and legs, which is why most experienced skiers take that approach.

 

It also works very well for your hands, yet it seems like few skiers do it that way.  Can't say I understand why...

 

I use a mitten shell with different size gloves underneath depending on the weather, sometimes two layers inside the shell.  It works for temps ranging from -35 to about +60 (after which the snow is too sticky to ski.)  In addition to being very versatile, as long as I remember to remove the inner layer overnight I always start of with dry gloves - all-in-one systems without removable liners never seem to dry out.

post #32 of 42
Actually, since I started putting wind pants over my insulated ski pants, I haven't needed heat packs. I threw away close to an entire box, hard as rocks.
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

So what if it is a high school or college student?  Do we dislike them and avoid helping them out?  Why?

 

As others have pointed out there's a rhythm to these queries that smack of spam or some ulterior motive.

post #34 of 42

I buy the little tea-bag shaped hand warmers by the box every season, and put them directly against my fingers inside my mittens.  They do me not a whit of good in a pocket over my palm; that's where some gloves want you to put them.  My palm is not cold; it's my fingers. The warmers have never ever burned my hands.  It's toasty in my mittens; I love them.  

post #35 of 42

The nice thing about the heated gloves is that it takes the warmth all the way down to the fingertips, which a heat pack can't do. I don't have any, but I know some people who do.  So if you need more dexterity than a mitten provides, it's an answer.  

 

Some people just get colder than others; they layer and do all the recommended things, but they are still cold. There isn't a big market for heated gloves, but I think for those who need them, they are worth every penny. 

post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

I wish someone could figure out how to heat my ass after it freezes to a snow covered lift chair.  That I would pay for.

They have: heated lift seats.

And I hate them. By the time I get on the lift I am ready to unzip my jacket and open my pant vents. And if I ever get chilly by the top... it isn't my ass that needs heating.
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

I wish someone could figure out how to heat my ass after it freezes to a snow covered lift chair.  That I would pay for.

Two words. Fanny flap.
post #38 of 42
I definitely prefer a large mitten shell and a glove liner. Preferably one that I can use a phone with... the liner that is.

Kinda like a thin, warm, wicking base layer plus pants and jacket shells.
post #39 of 42
I don't take phone calls when I'm skiing unless I'm having trouble meeting up with a ski buddy. Between batteries dying in the cold, lack of ability to see who the heck it is without my reading glasses, inability hear without turning on the speakerphone due to the wind and my helmet, gloves are the least of the problem. Thank God for dead zones. They can go to voice mail until such time as it's convenient for me to talk.
post #40 of 42
I don't take call while skiing either-- unless it is to score GNAR points.

But I do use my phone for non-phone things while at the resort and out touring. Including avy and slope and route related things. And I often have cameras... sometimes for work.

I can mash a shutter button with a mitten. Sometimes I need more than that.
post #41 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by justruss View Post

I don't take call while skiing either-- unless it is to score GNAR points.

But I do use my phone for non-phone things while at the resort and out touring. Including avy and slope and route related things. And I often have cameras... sometimes for work.

I can mash a shutter button with a mitten. Sometimes I need more than that.

I end up using my phone a lot because my friends span a pretty wide range of skill levels so it's easy to get separated.

post #42 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

... lack of ability to see who the heck it is without my reading glasses, inability hear without turning on the speakerphone due to the wind and my helmet, gloves are the least of the problem ...

 

This friend speaks to my condition. Not to mention that if it's snowing or raining, the touch screen spazzes out. 

 

Ironically, two of the times I remember really wanting / needing to use my phone while skiing have been while trying to connect with Barking Bears at Saddleback. (I have observed that other Bears are just as fidgety and impatient about waiting in a pre-arranged spot for more than fourteen seconds beyond the designated time as I am, and are just as prone to taking off for another lap before attempting a second pass at a meet-up. When both the surroundings and the assignee are unfamiliar, the problem is exacerbated, and a cell phone can help.)

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