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Q: 2014 Salomon Heat-Molding Process

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Are both the boot liner and corresponding boot shell pre-heated separately in their specific “ovens” –  with the warmed liner then reinserted back into the hot shell as you step into for the hold & mold process?

 

I believe the liner heater runs at perhaps 170F with the shell oven approaching 200F.  I’m wondering if inserting the liner into the hotter shell would cause damage to the liner.  In fact, is heating the liner even necessary due to the heat generated by the shell?

 

During the molding process, do you advise your clients to stand neutral or flexed forward a bit?

 

If your client has particular hot spots such as bunion or 6th toe, is using additional pads placed on liner for relief practical with the Salomon plastic when fully heated or are those specific areas punched by you outside heat molding process?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 4

I typically heat the liner and shell separately. The shell goes in a convection oven (this is important) and the liners on a heat stack made for the application.

 

I will pad problem areas or use toe caps, etc. depending on what we are trying to accomplish.

 

We have the client stand still and FLAT, for the first 10 minutes, and then put them out in the snow to finish the job.

 

While the Custom shell works well, they are still plastic shoes and we work on them conventionally as well.

 

I do not automatically heat every single pair. Only if it is needed.

 

The boots do not get smaller, only bigger, so if I do not anticipate a need for shell expansion, we leave them alone.

 

jl

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BOOTech,Inc. View Post
...

The boots do not get smaller, only bigger, so if I do not anticipate a need for shell expansion, we leave them alone.

 

jl

Thanks for your comments Jim:

 

I would think the PU specifically used for heat molding would be welcomed by you and other professionals.  Much I suppose like the Fischer Vacuum process, plastic manipulation specific for the individual, if done right, provides an initial customizing offering that sets up well for even “finer” work.

 

But I’m wondering if Salomon’s heat molding is being presented as a “one-and-done” process by some newly trained sales folks at the big shops.  I can also imagine where there are a number of things that could really blow that softer PU (amazing how pliable it becomes) into some larger fixed shape if the “fitter” does not carefully control the buyer movement and position.  Further, I don’t see any “cold baths” for those shells to lock down the new mold on site.

 

Nevertheless, my experience with the XMax 130 heat molding was a great one managed by a pro.  Frankly I was dumbfounded how it relaxed the 98 boot shell last (downsized btw) at my historical problematic hot spots – uniquely to each foot – including the instep!  But I’m now further aware this process requires a professional that knows the clients foot and alignment as well as how to manage everything such as knowledge of the PU limitations, position, boot buckling, movement, timeframe and cool down.  

post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
 

Thanks for your comments Jim:

 

I would think the PU specifically used for heat molding would be welcomed by you and other professionals.  Much I suppose like the Fischer Vacuum process, plastic manipulation specific for the individual, if done right, provides an initial customizing offering that sets up well for even “finer” work.

 

Yes and no. It takes a different formulation of plastic to mold at such low temperatures and so it performs differently in some aspects.

 

The primary benefit of easy bake boots (I'm not knocking it, we sell a lot of them) is that it allows shops with little or no tooling and/or expertise to deliver a far more personalized fit than they could before. It is easy and it does do some things well (particularly vertical expansion). The process cuts down on break in time as well.

 

For the time being Polyether is still the plastic of choice for race boots.

 

Ultimately, I think 3D printing is going be "the next BIG thing".  

 

jl

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