or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › Taos/Crested Butte/Silverton 10 Day Road Trip- Help!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Taos/Crested Butte/Silverton 10 Day Road Trip- Help! - Page 2

post #31 of 68

No need to go all the way back to Glenwood/I-70.  Take a left at Carbondale on the way out of Aspen and take this route over McClure pass for bit shorter drive:

 

http://goo.gl/maps/u5EcH

 

But, if driving at night or in a storm I'd probably take the I-70 route to Grand Junction then down 50 to Montrose.  McClure Pass can be a bit sketchy.

 

Either way Aspen to CB is a long drive in the winter to go a short distance as the crow flies.

 

On the trip in general... for the best skiing, don't fall into the trap of trying to lock everything down in advance.  I'd still say keep flexibility and hit 3 of the 4 mountains with the best snow, and spend extra time where you find the best conditions.   But... traveling with your girlfriend you probably want to have things locked down a bit more.  My wife is the same way, and wants to know details in advance.  I'll lock down the first and last couple nights, then keep everything flexible between.  That usually keeps up both happy.

post #32 of 68

If you are still thinking about Silverton, here's my trip report from a few years ago:

 

http://epicski.onthesnow.com/t/86133/silverton-on-super-bowl-sunday-2009

post #33 of 68

Hey Steve,

 

Since this will be your first trip to CB here are a couple of guides to help you enjoy it:

 

Restaurants & Bars: http://travelcrestedbutte.com/crested-butte-restaurants/

 

Lodginghttp://travelcrestedbutte.com/crested-butte-lodging/  

 

And a few things to check off your list: http://travelcrestedbutte.com/8-things-you-must-do-first-visit-crested-butte/

 

Depending on your budget, we recommend a B&B experience in town.  The shuttle up to the mountain is free and runs frequently.  Probably wouldn't plan on staying for less than 3 nights- you'll not want to leave once you get here...trust me!

 

Hope this helps,


Josh

post #34 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post
 

 

 

Aspen, Crested Butte, and Taos sounds great...gives you plenty of time to explore each of them without spending too much time driving around.

That would be a lot of driving for me (though I'm not sure about what it will be for SunValleySteve).  At nearly 300mi. between these locations they will essentially be all day drives (or longer if there's some major winter weather).  Personally I'd want to stick with one of the following "closer-knit" areas like Aspen (with a possible side trip to Vail or Beaver Creek), CB (and then Silverton/Telluride), or SW CO (to access Wolf Creek, Taos, Silverton and maybe T-ride).  I've always preferred the last choice given the greater chance of snow at Wolf Creek and Silverton...and then if the snow is good in Taos you'll have a ski experience that deserves to be on any "best pucker-factor" list (it's in the top 5 for me).

post #35 of 68

You will be driving through some of the most scenic areas in the nation. That being said, the roads take a bit more time. 550 north of Purgatory has to be seen to be believed. Mucho vert.Ouray is incredibly charming. Durango and Pagosa Springs a bit more built up. Montrose is just strange.

 

Keep a very close eye on what the snow gods are up to. Any storm passing thru is likely to dump entirely differently in this region. Telluride always has the least snow. Wolf Creek always has the most. I've never skied at either one. Crested Butte is also known for very scratchy conditions.

 

I wouldn't bother making reservations anywhere. Play it by ear. All of the resorts you mention have had sub-par seasons two years in a row and I expect only slight improvement at best.

 

Silverton is a place one goes to only for powder conditions. Untracked is its great appeal. CB has a lot of back country options if you are doing exclusive powder hounding.

 

Purg, CB, Wolf Creek, Monarch, and Taos all have next to no money. The ski areas are broke (as in no money). Purg is the most affluent because they sell a lot of property. The latter two might not have the vert you are looking for.

 

Telluride is like Sun Valley, a major corp is beind it pumping in dollars. CB has a major corp behind it, but it has lost money so many years in a row it is on shaky footing. It is another one of those mountains capable of making ends meet by selling property.

 

Much of the mega-steep at Taos, Telluride, and Crested Butte was not even open in early Feb last year. That is why I say keep close track of conditions. If there's more than 50 inches at mid-mountain, that means the steep stuff is "on" at any of them. And, if a storm is on the way, be cautious about changing mountains. You will be crossing some of the highest passes in the U.S. It's not quite as easy as negotiating the great Intermountain valley area - roads there are at least 3,000 ft. lower.

 

The natural hot springs in Ouray, Pagosa Springs, and Durango stay open through the winter. Outstanding swimming.

 

What is likely to happen is that you will find that one resort meets all of your needs. That is what happened with me and Taos. I know that I want to ski other areas. They are just in Canada or Europe.

Taos has the right mix of mega-steep and side area powder. Good bumps. Good trees. Significant vert. I thought of moving to Telluride, but I didn't want the mega-corporation thing.

post #36 of 68
Thread Starter 

Well last night I booked my trip. Through an RCI Special I got a week at the WyndamTaos (next to the downtown plaza) for $199 for a week (studio) starting March 31st. I couldnt turn it down at that price. I probably will take a side trip to Wolf Creek, and stay one night in Pagosa Springs. The steeps should be ready to go I hope. I really looking forward to going  to Taos. I have never been there. Crested Butte will have to wait another trip. 

 

I also booked a Feb 14-21 trip to Banff, Canada. I will be going for 9 nights. I got a two bedroom condo for $199

through the RCI special. The condo is in Canmore about 15 minutes from Banff. I plan on skiing 5 days at Lake Louise,  Panorama, and Sunshine. Then I may just leave my condo early and head to Revelstoke for 2 days, and Kicking Horse for 2 days on the way back. 

 

I am stoked about both going to some places. I hear Revelstoke, Panaroma, KH, and LL can be skied with a discount Lake Louise Card. I need to check in to that.

 

Thanks everyone for the great Colorado road trip advice. 

post #37 of 68

You'll have a good time both in Canada & Taos.

 

If you are skiing Taos for the March week - Buy the Millenium pass for next season - It will get you free skiing for the last week of the this season. Effectively you'll be skiing for free next season.    

 

I'll in Taos for the same week. I'll be drive down from the Mammoth gathering to close out Taos. May be we can hook up and do a few runs.

post #38 of 68
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tip on buying next years Taos pass in late March.

I might do it since I have affordable accomadations.

I like art and culture as well and Taos and Sante Fe has plenty of that.

It cant hurt to have another pass as long as I get value out of it.

I would like to ski a few turns with you. 

I would like to some hiking up to Kachina Peak if conditions are good. 

post #39 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunValleySteve View Post
 

I wanted to do a 9 night road trip to Southern Colorado that includes Taos.

Taos and Crested Butte are on the top of my list. I also realize you have Wolf Creek,

Silverton, Telluride, and Purgatory in the area. My trip is planned for mid Feb.

 

What would be a good trip plan? I would like to stay a couple nights in each location.

Any suggestions about how I would divide up the trip?

 

I would like to fly into Alb, New Mexico or Denver via Southwest.

 

I do have a Mountain Collective Pass with two free days at Aspen.

I have been there twice so I could skip Aspen and focus on some resorts I have never been to

 

Example

Day 1 and Day 2- Durango (Ski Silverton and Purgatory)

Day 3, 4, 5, 6 (Crested Butte and/or Telluride)

Day 7, 8, 9 (Taos)

 

Is this doing too much? How would I modify it?

 

Thanks,

 

Steve

 

1. For the mountains you are describing, you would want to fly into Albuquerque. It is 7 1/2 hours, not including food stops, from DIA to Durango. To get to Durango, you are driving over Kenosha, Trout Creek, Poncha, and Wolf Creek passes. Considering the length of the drive, you will likely be doing Wolf Creek at night. It is a rare day in winter that Wolf Creek Pass does not have at least snowpack, and flip a coin as to whether it is snowing up there.

 

Albuquerque is about 4 hours away from Durango, and you don't have to negotiate snowy passes.

 

2. Purg is not a terrible place to ski, but for an out of stater, I would say skip it. It sits in a snow shadow, and gets a little more than half the snow Wolf Creek gets. Telluride and Silverton get a ton more snow as well. The mountain is not terribly difficult, and a lot of it gets groomed. If somebody is looking to slay the cord, it can be a fun place with some long steeper groomers. For somebody looking for gnar or deep snow, skip.

 

3. Wolf Creek will definitely be the safest bet in the area for both a powder day and a bottomless base in mid-feb. If your trip involves Presidents weekend, do not ski at Wolf that weekend- it gets absolutely mobbed by Texas 1 weekend a year skiers. Wolf is fairly unique in that it does not have sustained steep pitches- it has 200-600 feet of some of the steepest stuff you can find inbounds, but almost every line has sections of green-run pitch.  The other unique part of Wolf is that the Alberta area is 1000 acres with no cut trails, just a single lift. The tree skiing is absolutely amazing- best in the state in my opinion. Assuming you are an expert skier, it would be amazing if you could not find tons of untracked at Wolf, even if it has been several days from a storm. You can check out the guide in my signature for lots of pictures and information that should help you figure out if you want to spend a day or two there.

 

4. I love Monarch. It has a great little ski area vibe. It has a lot of advanced terrain, but nothing really difficult in the lift served area.  A good skier will have a ball here on powder days, because for whatever reason, most skiers here are just not expert skiers, and so the advanced runs, and especially the trees, do not see traffic.  The Mirkwood area is a short hike and is awesome. It wind loads DEEP, it gets even less skiers than the rest of the mountain, and runs like Staircase are very legitimate. But unless you have a thing for old-school ski areas, I would skip it. It has 1100 vert and I would recommend an out of stater ski Telluride, CB, Wolf, Taos instead of using a day at Monarch.

 

5. What people have said about US 550 from Durango to Ouray is accurate, especially the Ouray-Silverton section. It is sketchy in the Summer. In the winter with snow down, it is terrifying. It is built to 1920's standards- no shoulder and narrow lanes. For 6 miles through the gorge, the Southbound lane has a 600-800 foot drop just past the white line. In many areas, the white line is not there because the piece of asphalt it was painted on has fallen over the cliff. There are no guardrails- the avalanches would destroy them every year. There are avalanche slide paths throughout the entire gorge. Trucks use the route -it is common to round a corner and see an 18 wheeler in the middle of the road. Northbound is less scary because you hug the cliff wall instead of the cliff face. If you take this road in either direction, budget 3 hours to get from Ouray to Durango- 70 miles. I would not take this road at night or when snow is in the forecast.

 

6. Lizard Head Pass is a much safer way to get from Ouray to Durango in the Winter. It is a much longer trip, but if you are going to Telluride, I would try to work out your drive that way.

 

7. Remember that you need to book Silverton in Feb. I would schedule your guided day and work out your trip from that.

post #40 of 68

If I had to put a trip like this together, I would do something like:

 

Day 1- fly into Alb. Drive to Taos.

 

Day 2 and 3 ski Taos. Drive to Del Norte or Pagosa Springs night of Day 3 (bedroom communities for Wolf- Del Norte is a shorter drive from Taos, Pagosa is a nicer resort town and is a shorter drive to the rest of your trip).

 

Day 4- Ski Wolf Creek

 

Day 5- ski Wolf again if you liked it. If not, drive to Durango night of day 4 and ski Silverton this day.

 

Day 6- Get up early in Durango and make the Silverton drive. Limited bed space in Silverton, and you don't really want to make the drive tired at night. Ski Silverton. After, drive either NORTH towards CB (this is the sketch section of road on US 550) or South if you want to ski Telluride.

 

Day 7-8-9 ski CB or Telluride, returning to Alb.

 

CB is  further out from this area than Telluride. Telluride gets more snow, and will have a better chance of having all of the goods open in mid-feb.  I would give the nod to CB for terrain, but you should feel lucky to have everything at CB open then. So, I would lean to ski Telluride.

 

If you choose not to ski 2 days at Wolf, you basically have an extra day to spend someplace else. But I really would ski at least a day at Wolf.

 

It is about 2 1/2 hours from Durango to Telluride. You can get up in the morning and make that drive. So, if you are skiing Silverton, I would drive back to Durango from there, stay overnight in Durango, and make the drive in the morning. You will likely feel pretty worn out after a Silverton day, so I wouldn't count on feeling up to driving to Telluride from Silverton.

 

I did this in a way that made geographic sense. It may not make physical sense. Silverton is likely the day that will physically tax you the most will all the hiking and skiing at a group pace instead of your own. But it is hard to start a trip with Silverton first, because it is right in the middle.

 

If you can manage a flight into Durango, or even Telluride, it would be a lot easier.

post #41 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Z Taos View Post
 

You will be driving through some of the most scenic areas in the nation. That being said, the roads take a bit more time. 550 north of Purgatory has to be seen to be believed. Mucho vert.Ouray is incredibly charming. Durango and Pagosa Springs a bit more built up. Montrose is just strange.

 

Agree.

 

Keep a very close eye on what the snow gods are up to. Any storm passing thru is likely to dump entirely differently in this region. Telluride always has the least snow. Wolf Creek always has the most. I've never skied at either one. Crested Butte is also known for very scratchy conditions.

 

This is not true. Telluride gets more snow than Purg and CB. Telluride can be volatile though- feast or famine. Purg is on the backside of the same mountain range as Telluride, and thus gets less, with the same type of volatility. CB basically gets what is left in the storms that pass over Telluride and Purg, or Aspen from the other direction. Wolf Creek has a straight shot from the SW, and will get more snow than anywhere else in Colorado almost every year.

 

I wouldn't bother making reservations anywhere. Play it by ear. All of the resorts you mention have had sub-par seasons two years in a row and I expect only slight improvement at best.

 

Just going off of averages, this year should be better. Judging by the fat flakes coming down right now, I have high hopes.

 

Silverton is a place one goes to only for powder conditions. Untracked is its great appeal. CB has a lot of back country options if you are doing exclusive powder hounding.

 

But Silverton is also a place where 150 people ski 8 runs a day. Untracked is a very safe bet. CB does have some great guided BC options that get a lot more snow than CB itself.

 

Purg, CB, Wolf Creek, Monarch, and Taos all have next to no money. The ski areas are broke (as in no money). Purg is the most affluent because they sell a lot of property. The latter two might not have the vert you are looking for.

 

Really, really, really not true. Wolf Creek and Monarch have been VERY profitable. Purg is losing money because they are trying to sell real estate and it is not working well (just look at RE prices a Purg.) . CB is losing money. Wolf Creek and Monarch have no real estate and only run ski operations. They are not resorts, and have the feel of a smaller operation. But it is not fair and totally untrue to say that they have no money- both Wolf and Monarch have sunk millions and millions into improvements the past few years and have made money on their investments. Purg has sunk millions into real estate, and is eating shot for it.

 

Telluride is like Sun Valley, a major corp is beind it pumping in dollars. CB has a major corp behind it, but it has lost money so many years in a row it is on shaky footing. It is another one of those mountains capable of making ends meet by selling property.

 

Both Telluride and CB are losing money. Telluride invested a ton into opening up areas of the mountain that give it World Class terrain type status, but didn't get enough ski visits to pay for it. CB has seen declining ski visits over the past 15 years. Both have operations that look to balance the bottom line through real estate sales. But, this talk of what ski areas make money and which don't seems like color commentary that isn't really related to the ski experience- all of these places should be fun as hell to the expert skier. 

 

Much of the mega-steep at Taos, Telluride, and Crested Butte was not even open in early Feb last year. That is why I say keep close track of conditions. If there's more than 50 inches at mid-mountain, that means the steep stuff is "on" at any of them. And, if a storm is on the way, be cautious about changing mountains. You will be crossing some of the highest passes in the U.S. It's not quite as easy as negotiating the great Intermountain valley area - roads there are at least 3,000 ft. lower.

 

In a normal year, Mid Feb should be safe for 100% open at Telluride, and possible for 100% at CB. 3 terrible years in a row would be so rare it basically hasn't really happened in skiing history here. It has been a crazily wet second half of the summer, and the pattern continues. We can't tell what 4 months will bring, but I don't see any reason to not expect an average year.

 

The natural hot springs in Ouray, Pagosa Springs, and Durango stay open through the winter. Outstanding swimming.

 

Pagosa's are very resortish. Durango's are attached to an RV park and are more basic but definitely a great way to relax. Ouray's are run by the city and have kind of a public pool that happens to be a hot springs vibe. I'm not discouraging any of them, but they are different.

 

What is likely to happen is that you will find that one resort meets all of your needs. That is what happened with me and Taos. I know that I want to ski other areas. They are just in Canada or Europe.

Taos has the right mix of mega-steep and side area powder. Good bumps. Good trees. Significant vert. I thought of moving to Telluride, but I didn't want the mega-corporation thing.

post #42 of 68
Quote:
But it is hard to start a trip with Silverton first, because it is right in the middle. 

And it's dumb for anyone who lives at sea level to start a trip at Silverton with all the hiking above 12,000 feet.  The more days you've been sleeping at 8,000+ (I'd recommend at least 4 and a week is ideal) the more you will be comfortable at Silverton.

 

Anachronism has it right about snowfall at Telluride, Purgatory and CB.  Telluride is typically 100% open late February and March.  CB is rarely truly 100% open (Banana/Funnel, Third Bowl??).  But still a great expert spot if 80+% open.

post #43 of 68

Sun Valley Steve has decided (and booked) Taos the end of March. WC as a possible side trip.

 

That late in the season can be anything, refrozen, a slush pond or great powder. Here's hoping the snow gods smile on you Steve. No matter which, the ridge always holds the best snow, so get in hiking shape!

 

Santa Fe has a slightly higher elevation than Taos or Wolf Creek in case it's warm and is good for a day trip and great museums and galleries, etc. SF Ski Basin has great trees, even though it's much smaller. If you go to Pagosa, I highly recommend the Hot Springs. Not cheap and a slightly funky vibe, but a hoot with dozens of tubs at varying degrees from moderate to lobster and a river cold plunge. Kipp's grill for beer and Baja style Mexican; The Alley House Grill for more upscale very good food (make a reservation).

 

In Taos, find out when a good band is playing at the Sagebrush Inn. When they have a good swing dancing band, it brings dancers from the four corners and they are so much fun to watch. The bar itself is fun too, like something out of an old western.

post #44 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunValleySteve View Post
 

Thanks for the tip on buying next years Taos pass in late March.

I might do it since I have affordable accomadations.

I like art and culture as well and Taos and Sante Fe has plenty of that.

It cant hurt to have another pass as long as I get value out of it.

I would like to ski a few turns with you.

I would like to some hiking up to Kachina Peak if conditions are good.

 

The new Main Street Lift to top of Kachina is scheduled to be completed for the 2014 / 2015 season. Have to check whether they completed the power cable installation to Easy Street as scheduled. So this is definitely a good year to hike Kachina Peak – may be the last. But knowing Taos - probably not, and that is a good thing.

 

PM me as time get closer.

post #45 of 68

Taos end of March is an excellent time, probably safer than anything before February.  Steep north facing at that altitude should still be winter snow. My 3-day trip Taos' last week in 1993 was great, also had 9 inches new snow.

post #46 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom View Post
 

Sun Valley Steve has decided (and booked) Taos the end of March. WC as a possible side trip.

 

That late in the season can be anything, refrozen, a slush pond or great powder. Here's hoping the snow gods smile on you Steve. No matter which, the ridge always holds the best snow, so get in hiking shape!

 

Santa Fe has a slightly higher elevation than Taos or Wolf Creek in case it's warm and is good for a day trip and great museums and galleries, etc. SF Ski Basin has great trees, even though it's much smaller. If you go to Pagosa, I highly recommend the Hot Springs. Not cheap and a slightly funky vibe, but a hoot with dozens of tubs at varying degrees from moderate to lobster and a river cold plunge. Kipp's grill for beer and Baja style Mexican; The Alley House Grill for more upscale very good food (make a reservation).

 

In Taos, find out when a good band is playing at the Sagebrush Inn. When they have a good swing dancing band, it brings dancers from the four corners and they are so much fun to watch. The bar itself is fun too, like something out of an old western.

 

Yes, I saw that as soon as I posted basically everything I posted above. Late March is a better time than Mid Feb- everything should have the deepest base of the season and that time of year it is much more likely to be either dumping or warm enough to be creamy than crusty.

 

Wolf Creek's main base area is 10,600 feet (a bit higher than Santa Fe). I guess Santa Fe has a new chair that gets it to a slightly higher peak elevation, but I doubt any of that makes much of a real difference in snow preservation. The warmer climate from being Santa Fe being a few hundred miles further South could...

 

Riff Raff Brewery in Pagosa serves very nice brews and some awesome burgers. Last time I was there I had a goat-meat burger that was just amazing. Kipps is pretty decent too. We haven't found anything else in Pagosa we have really liked so far...

post #47 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

Taos end of March is an excellent time, probably safer than anything before February.  Steep north facing at that altitude should still be winter snow. My 3-day trip Taos' last week in 1993 was great, also had 9 inches new snow.

 

I think for the OP, whether or not he should venture North to Wolf depends on the forecast. If Taos is forecast to get 12"+, definitely ski Taos that day! But, consider hitting Wolf the day after- its a very safe bet that Wolf will have plenty to give up in untracked. 

 

If Taos is forecast for 3" (or some other figure of not quite enough to make it a full blown powder day) Wolf will likely be seeing enough to make it a powder day.

 

Also, if you get really lucky and have multiple days of snowfall, pay attention to what Wolf is getting- when other places get 3" 6", 4" out of a light storm, Wolf can be seeing 12", 20" 15" from the same storm.

post #48 of 68

Anachronism, next time you're in Pagosa, the Alley House Grill, really does have good food in a very nice atmosphere. I'll check out Riff Raff...

post #49 of 68
Thread Starter 

The Alley House Grill sounds great in Pagosa. We will be staying near the plaza in Taos. Can anyone recommend

a couple good restaurants? Perhaps one that is mexican or Tex-Mex? 

post #50 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunValleySteve View Post
 

The Alley House Grill sounds great in Pagosa. We will be staying near the plaza in Taos. Can anyone recommend

a couple good restaurants? Perhaps one that is mexican or Tex-Mex? 

 

Good restaurants in Taos:  Doc Martin's, Lamberts, Taos Pizza Outback, Pizanos, Orlando's, Guadalajara Grill, and many more.  The last two have New Mexican cuisine, not Tex-Mex.  Tex-Mex is pretty much an insult and you shouldn't ask for that.  Unfortunately, Graham's Grill recently closed. 

post #51 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
 

 

Good restaurants in Taos:  Doc Martin's, Lamberts, Taos Pizza Outback, Pizanos, Orlando's, Guadalajara Grill, and many more.  The last two have New Mexican cuisine, not Tex-Mex.  Tex-Mex is pretty much an insult and you shouldn't ask for that.  Unfortunately, Graham's Grill recently closed. 

 

Also note that authentic New Mexico cuisine tends to be significantly hotter than what is typical for American "mexican" or "Tex/Mex" fare, and most of the good New Mexican restaurants in Taos have a reputation of burning your tongue off. Great stuff, but come prepared, and don't ask for the hot stuff unless you are 100% sure you really want it HOT.

post #52 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
 

 

Good restaurants in Taos:  Doc Martin's, Lamberts, Taos Pizza Outback, Pizanos, Orlando's, Guadalajara Grill, and many more.  The last two have New Mexican cuisine, not Tex-Mex.  Tex-Mex is pretty much an insult and you shouldn't ask for that.  Unfortunately, Graham's Grill recently closed.

 

Also note that authentic New Mexico cuisine tends to be significantly hotter than what is typical for American "mexican" or "Tex/Mex" fare, and most of the good New Mexican restaurants in Taos have a reputation of burning your tongue off. Great stuff, but come prepared, and don't ask for the hot stuff unless you are 100% sure you really want it HOT.

 

One time I arrived in Taos a little late, and the restaurants close a little early there.  Darn, guess I'll have to use the Wendy's drive through.  They had a green chile chicken sandwich on the menu!  Gotta love New Mexico.

post #53 of 68

World Cup Coffee in Taos.  Fabulous coffee and a cool vibe.  I would get a cup for the drive from town to ski, and then stop again when I got back in the evening..

post #54 of 68

BTW, SunValleySteve, If you are there for the week and are startin gon Sunday or Monday, make sure to sign up for a ski week. Best $120 you'll ever spent.   

post #55 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

 

One time I arrived in Taos a little late, and the restaurants close a little early there.  Darn, guess I'll have to use the Wendy's drive through.  They had a green chile chicken sandwich on the menu!  Gotta love New Mexico.

 

One of the minor differences you find living in the 4 corners is that EVERYBODY makes a green chile something. Even chains like Subway, Papa Murphys, etc. have green chiles as toppings. Being closer to the source means that you can buy some pretty amazing chile peppers.

post #56 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

Also note that authentic New Mexico cuisine tends to be significantly hotter than what is typical for American "mexican" or "Tex/Mex" fare, and most of the good New Mexican restaurants in Taos have a reputation of burning your tongue off. Great stuff, but come prepared, and don't ask for the hot stuff unless you are 100% sure you really want it HOT.

 

The official state question is:  Red or Green?  You should then ask which is hotter today and go for it.  The good places make their chile daily. 

post #57 of 68

Chocolate Extreme at the base of Taos mountain has wonderful home-made chocolates and fudge. The family is really nice; the daughter placed on the podium two or three times in the World Freeskiing Tour at Taos.

 

The bar at the El Monte Sagrado hotel is worth going in for a drink. (you can eat at the restaurant there too but it's expensive and a bit precious)

 

Don't forget the Sagebrush Inn bar; that is a great scene.

 

+1 for World Cup Coffee and Guadalajara Grill (Cameron Ranchero is my favorite there) and Pizza Outback (although it's more fun in summer when you can eat out back).

 

The restaurant at the La Fonda Hotel on the Plaza was considered one of the best. I ate there about four years ago and found the food excellent but very, very expensive.

 

Of course on-mountain, you  must eat at the Bavarian at least once. Their apple strudel is to die for and they make great home-made soups. Also, that late in the season, you can eat outside and lounge on their chaises and drink beer (Bavarian natch). And the après at the Hotel St. Bernard can't be beat. The décor is like going back in time to the hey day of Euro-skiing with a NM twist. (You said you like art, see if you can find the snowboard Retablo there..)

post #58 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
 

The official state question is:  Red or Green?  You should then ask which is hotter today and go for it.  The good places make their chile daily.

Christmas!

post #59 of 68

No argument here that Wolf Creek will likely have better skiing than Santa Fe. BUT it's a 3+ hour one way drive while Santa Fe is much closer and on the way to or from his gateway airport and he might be stopping there for tourism reasons anyway.

 

+1 to New Mexico Mexican food, average quality a cut above what you get most places.

post #60 of 68

Ive lost track  -- I think you are planning a loop.  If not, flying into one airport and out of another can make the rental car a lot more expensive.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Resorts, Conditions & Travel
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › Taos/Crested Butte/Silverton 10 Day Road Trip- Help!