or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › EpicSki Community › International Zone › Ski season in Europe
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ski season in Europe

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Okay so basically I'm trying to get a job in a European resort for this coming season. I was hoping for a rep / ski hire shop job in Austria, preferably in Mayrhofen / Hintertux for the insane park. Does anybody have any experience of this? If so, any advice on how to get a job and general advice would be much appreciated. 

 

Thanks

post #2 of 12

I'd guess that speaking German would be a good, near required start. Also, I'd guess you may be running out of time considering Hintertux has been open for, well, ever (it doesn't close during summer), and has already started getting new snow on cold/wet days. 

 

Personally, living in Tux would be difficult for me considering how little there is there-- and how tucked back into the Ziller valley it is. Mayrhofen would be better. But why not look at the rest of the valley further north, including Hochzillertal, Hochfugen, etc, or looking within about 1-2 hrs from there, including Fieberbrunn, Skiwelt/Brixen/Wilderkaiser, and all the others. Of course, I don't touch the park, so I can't comment on that part of the equation. 

 

Good luck. I don't ever run into native English speakers working in shops in the area, mostly pretty-close-to-home young locals (HS/Uni) who also tend to speak enough English for basic tourist-interaction. These places don't look like they have tons of winter-time employment options, and I'm sure the local kids snap them up. Lots of the shops are family-run branches of larger operations. 

post #3 of 12
Following the theme of checking other resorts, you might have more luck trying Ischgl and St. Anton. Both are quite big and draw people from around Europe, and I've seen bar/restaurant workers in St. Anton who didn't speak German. That size and diverse customer base might make it easier to find a job.

One other option might be to check out some of the UK tour operators. Mark Warner springs to mind, given that they run the hotels where their guests stay and staff them with mostly British employees.
post #4 of 12

Some good advice from CV. There's going to be a larger base of stuff going on-- and larger influx of English-speaking visitors-- at St. Anton. On one hand, competition from English-speaking ski-bums might be higher there... but at least there will be jobs to compete for. And I'm guessing more places will be amenable to hiring you (said without knowing your background).

 

Bars/restaurants there are a good place to look. Bonus if it means you have the daytime off... if you're good at managing your willi-schnapps-based hangover. 

post #5 of 12

If you're not really hung up on Austria, you might also consider Méribel in Les Trrois Vallées (lots of Brits who don't speak any French, both tourists and people who have season jobs there) and Tignes. Both great spots and even greater ski areas.

post #6 of 12

Also check out Les Arcs and la Plagne or down in the valley around Bourg St Maurice. Great riding in these areas and Tignes/Val d'Isere is just up the road.

 

Take a look at my facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/LesArcsWinter

post #7 of 12

I am heading to Val Thorens in Jan. 2014. I have heard, and seen on youtube, some amazing things about this resort. Your honest opinion???

post #8 of 12

No seasonal worker's experience but if park skiing is your main focus then yes Mayrhofen is the place to go in Austria. Much better than St. Anton for THAT purpose. Else look into France (Les 2 Alpes, La Clusaz) since it is more difficult to obtain a work permit for Switzerland.

 

Good luck!

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nix View Post

I am heading to Val Thorens in Jan. 2014. I have heard, and seen on youtube, some amazing things about this resort. Your honest opinion???

 



Be prepared to ski in low/no visibility.

The tree line in that part of the Alps is around 2000 m. The base altitude in Val Thorens is 2300 m, so there are no trees to duck down into when it snows or when some low clouds roll in and reduce the visibility. To get to some trees, you'll have to take the lifts to the top of the mountain and ski several hundred meters of vertical down toward Meribel.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nix View Post
 

I am heading to Val Thorens in Jan. 2014. I have heard, and seen on youtube, some amazing things about this resort. Your honest opinion???

 



Be prepared to ski in low/no visibility.

The tree line in that part of the Alps is around 2000 m. The base altitude in Val Thorens is 2300 m, so there are no trees to duck down into when it snows or when some low clouds roll in and reduce the visibility. To get to some trees, you'll have to take the lifts to the top of the mountain and ski several hundred meters of vertical down toward Meribel.

Thanks for the advice. I will hope for blue bird days but mother nature doesn't always listen to us.

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nix View Post

Thanks for the advice. I will hope for blue bird days but mother nature doesn't always listen to us.

 



About 1/3 or more of the day's I've spent in the Alps have had snow or something else causing limited visibility, and I've only had one trip without any snow. That's why I never look at staying in resorts that are at or above tree line.

There are some things that you can do to prepare. First, you can try various home exercises with your eyes closed, like balancing on one foot or Bulgarian squat thrusts (ever so much fun). If you like skating, you can try skating without looking at the ground/ice. And on the mountain, you can practice skiing with your head up looking at objects around you rather than looking down at the ground.

The point is to get used to moving and balancing without seeing the ground. Once you can do that, then low visibility isn't as bad of a problem.

Here is a video I found of skiing on piste in Tignes in a snowstorm http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rs84IToERPA. Tignes is almost entirely above tree line except for a couple of little hamlets, so it's similar to Val Thorens. The key to staying safe and enjoying your skiing in these conditions is to keep you balance over the center of your skis, keep your legs soft to absorb any bumps, and keep your head up and eyes focused on the skiers and other objects (piste markers, snow cannons, lift towers, etc.) around you.

There's no point in looking at the ground because you're not going to get any useful information. Also, it will be very difficult to see the objects around you with your peripheral vision, so skiing with your head down will make it feel like skiers and other objects are just popping up out of nowhere.
post #12 of 12

I have a different view from CV. I think the visibility concerns are overblown and manageable.  The trade off is that lower elevation means worse snow conditions.  Anything below 2000 m is risky from a snow reliability perspective and it gets warm in the Alps even in January and February.  An option for the OP is to stay in Meribel instead of Val Thorens. He can still ski Val Thorens if the weather is right but will have better access to the rest of the 3V and the trees.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: International Zone
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › EpicSki Community › International Zone › Ski season in Europe