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Moving to STOWE VERMONT, need equipment recommendations

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, 

 

I recently landed a Job in Stowe Vermont starting in December and I definitely plan on skiing all season. Ive never skied Stowe before so I have no clue what to expect in terms of terrain. Would Stowe be a good location to pick up some park skis and teach myself park? Or is there a ski better fit for the mountain? 

 

Note: Ive been noticing A LOT of videos of people skiing in the woods at Stowe. What type of ski would you recommend for skiing in the woods? Something that I could also use to practice park would be preferable.

 

Thanks a bunch!

post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanLucas View Post
 

Hey guys, 

 

I recently landed a Job in Stowe Vermont starting in December and I definitely plan on skiing all season. Ive never skied Stowe before so I have no clue what to expect in terms of terrain. Would Stowe be a good location to pick up some park skis and teach myself park? Or is there a ski better fit for the mountain? 

 

Note: Ive been noticing A LOT of videos of people skiing in the woods at Stowe. What type of ski would you recommend for skiing in the woods? Something that I could also use to practice park would be preferable.

 

Thanks a bunch!

 

 

If you had ot have one ski for stowe get a 98 mm twin tipper ski with slight rocker.  should be able to be used to practice park as well...

 

What do you have now? are you skiing everyday? weekend warrior?  whats you skill level? are you willing to wake up early? are you willing to hike for turns?

post #3 of 15
Mr. Toad smells fresh blood for his next wild ride.
post #4 of 15

I am always looking to add to my minions......

 

but I am asking to actually recommend him a ski. If he is going to ski weekends only on groomers, is not willing to hike, and get up at the crack of noon then maybe a 70mm race carver is what he actually wants.

post #5 of 15

OP: Josh is a reliable - if strongly opinionated - source about all things Stowe. But you need to tell us a few things. Your size, previous skiing, any skis you own now, rough estimate of what you're good at and what you're not. Then he, and the rest of us, can offer some reasonable advice. Or more accurately, we'll tell you that you should ski what we ski, cuz it rocks everywhere. This is called reducing cognitive dissonance. 

 

That said, I kinda agree with him. If you're advanced and up, the fun stuff at Stowe is mostly off in the woods. Or out of bounds, or both. Unless you live for bumps. And totally agree that a 100-ish twin with a touch of rocker is a perfect tree ski for NE in general.

 

OTOH, the ski he's describing is the Blizzard One. He'll ski his until the topsheets are showing through the bases. But it hasn't been made in what, three years now - I may have the last unmounted new pair in existence - although you can find the female version (Crush, same ski, slightly different topsheet) here and there in 177 cm, which would be your ski if you're under say 180, and can live with pink and blue tartan topsheets. Cheap, too. Think Skis.com has some. 

 

Not sure about other twins that would match the One for that particular mission. There are some rockered skis that would come decently close. The Blizzard Kabookie, Salomon R2 92 from last year or Q98 from this year, Fischer Big Stix 98 from either year, and Prophet 98 all would work. 

 

If you're a bigger more aggressive skier, the Blizzard Bonafide would work, but tight trees are not its natural habitat. If you will only come out from your job for fresh soft snow, then something like the Rossi Soul 7 or Salomon Q 105 might be the ticket. 

 

But let's say you're an intermediate who needs to learn some basic stuff about carving and bumps, and the tree thing is more a target off in the future. Then forget all of the above, find a pair of high 70 to middle 80 mm all-mountains (there are many good ones), and figure on a second ski in a year or two. Invest in lessons.

 

In fact, invest in lessons no matter what. Lessons and boots, if yours are older and/or super stiff. 

post #6 of 15

beyond do you have plates?

 

notice I describe the one but honestly lots of ski are like it....

 

Soul 7

Nordica Soulrider

Worth Magic

 

elect

post #7 of 15

Hi Josh - Yeah, the whole deal. But problem is I want another plate, for AT. Do you know where they can still be found, short of buying a leftover Crush?

post #8 of 15
"the fun stuff at Stowe is mostly off in the woods. Or out of bounds, or both"

Exaggeration? I haven't skied Stowe in years - long enough ago that trees weren't a big thing for me or for most skiers. I seem to remember it being pretty fun anyway. Not just the bumps on Chin Clip, either. Maybe I'm just easy to please. smile.gif
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

"the fun stuff at Stowe is mostly off in the woods. Or out of bounds, or both"

Exaggeration? I haven't skied Stowe in years - long enough ago that trees weren't a big thing for me or for most skiers. I seem to remember it being pretty fun anyway. Not just the bumps on Chin Clip, either. Maybe I'm just easy to please. smile.gif

 

the fun stuff is everywhere. I do not ski trees when the resort is closed and I have wide open powder to ski . I ski trees because thats where the snow is, and honestly if you could choose between hard groomers or bumps or powdery nearly untouched trees what would you choose?

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

I am always looking to add to my minions......

 

but I am asking to actually recommend him a ski. If he is going to ski weekends only on groomers, is not willing to hike, and get up at the crack of noon then maybe a 70mm race carver is what he actually wants.

race carvers are that wide these days? Crap.....that makes my 90 waisted ski a mid fat!  :)

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice so far guys!

 

I would consider myself an expert skier. Although, Ive spent my life only getting to ski when I go to resorts about once a year. This means I have only ever rented skis. So forgive me for being a little bit clueless when it comes to ski terms. That being said, I have no issues when it comes to terrain. I prefer the harder stuff and spend most of my times on bowls and blacks. A while back I took a trip to Lake Louise canada and spent all of my time in the woods. Ever since then I have preferred going into the woods. But I also want to be able to teach myyself a little park when I can. While renting skis I began to prefer twin tip skis, so I  really think I would be most comfortable buying a pair of twin tip skis. 

 

Height: 5'10- 178 cm

Weight- 150 lb 68 kg

 

please let me know if any other information would help you guys recommend me a pair of skis that I will enjoy riding.

 

Thanks again!

 

Ryan

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

the fun stuff is everywhere. I do not ski trees when the resort is closed and I have wide open powder to ski . I ski trees because thats where the snow is, and honestly if you could choose between hard groomers or bumps or powdery nearly untouched trees what would you choose?

 

Bumps.  Thumbs Up  (Of course, I suck at tree skiing...).

post #13 of 15
Quote:
race carvers are that wide these days? Crap.....that makes my 90 waisted ski a mid fat!  :)

 

A 105 waisted Soul 7 is a mid-fat these days, or at least a go-everywhere all-mountain ski.

post #14 of 15
Lucky you OP, moving to the good part of the East Coast. Burlington is actually a really fun city up there too.
Quote:
 A 105 waisted Soul 7 is a mid-fat these days, or at least a go-everywhere all-mountain ski.

I was in a shop oggling all the new skis most of which was <80mm when my eyes passed over to some 95mm Head Venturi's. I remembered people calling 98mm Bones midfats, and it blew my fucking mind.

post #15 of 15

There's something to think about here. Am going to go check with a buddy who's an engineer, but pretty sure that the force required to tilt a ski on edge begins to increase dramatically when the ski is wider than the boot. We can even call skis over 100 mm "skinny" if we want, but they aren't going to go on edge or carve as easily or quickly or deeply as something below your last. Which typically will max out at 98-100; unclear if that's internal or external width. If internal, you have a few more mm to play with. If external, there ya go. 

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