or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Footbed Failure and Morton's Toe
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Footbed Failure and Morton's Toe

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

As a flat-footed person who wears orthotics daily, I understand the value of custom footbeds for skiing. However, the continuing saga of my own "custom" footbeds has taught me that few proclaimed "boot fitters" (read "kid working at the ski shop") possess the knowledge to acurately address the individual and unique needs of each skier. Hell, the last two podiatrists who made my daily orthotics couldn't correctly assess my needs.

 

Fortunately, I finally met a true boot-fitter (Jim Mates) who, within 2 minutes of looking at my feet, indicated that I have Morton's Toe (http://www.mortonstoe.com/), and that I probably have a tough time with balance. (Speechless). He stuck his hand under the ball and big toe area of my foot while I stood on my current orthotics to make the point. (More speechless).

 

Jim also took a look at my wife's height, body shape, bone lengths, and foot shape and rambled off three potential issues that she might encounter while skiing. She practically teared up. Just prior to meeting Jim that morning, she had asked if I would be sad if she gave up learning to ski. When asked why, she replied, "it hurts to ski."

 

Three years and four "boot-fitters" later, I finally feel like skiing will be the fun family activity that I always imagined.:yahoo:

 

GET THE FOOTBEDS, BUT DO THE RESEARCH!

post #2 of 6

Thanks for posting.  This is good information.  

 

I've noticed that my right 1st metatarsal likes to be up in the air, which makes balance on that right foot particularly difficult.  When the toe bears weight, things above it cave in badly and my balance goes wobbly.  I've played around with lifting that big toe (1st metatarsal) with hand-made lifts under my footbeds in my running shoes and ski boots.   It helps.  

 

Morton's Toe syndrome captures the issue perfectly.  It's very good to know this is something noticed and named by foot specialists.  Two podiatrists, 1 sports orthopedist surgeon, 2 c-ped bootfitters, and numerous other shop bootfitters I've consulted with all missed it.  Your bootfitter must be very good.

post #3 of 6
Jim rocks. If I recall, it was his own issues with foot pain, etc... That got him into the whole business.
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Thanks for posting.  This is good information.  

 

I've noticed that my right 1st metatarsal likes to be up in the air, which makes balance on that right foot particularly difficult.  When the toe bears weight, things above it cave in badly and my balance goes wobbly.  I've played around with lifting that big toe (1st metatarsal) with hand-made lifts under my footbeds in my running shoes and ski boots.   It helps.  

 

Morton's Toe syndrome captures the issue perfectly.  It's very good to know this is something noticed and named by foot specialists.  Two podiatrists, 1 sports orthopedist surgeon, 2 c-ped bootfitters, and numerous other shop bootfitters I've consulted with all missed it.  Your bootfitter must be very good.

 

So, I just had my right 1st toe fused. It kind of created a Morton's toe, because it is fused at a slight elevation, and because it is quite a bit shorter than my 2nd toe now (joint space is gone... I had an artificial implant in there for 6 years, but that had to be removed ... so a bunch of stuff was taken out of my toe).

 
For the first month out of my cast, I was still using my old orthotic while the new one was being made. This change in geometry of the big toe was kind of freaking me out, because my knee and hip and the 2nd and 3rd toes were really suffering. I know exactly what you mean by that "caving in" feeling. Everything gets even wonkier. I knew intellectually that I had a footbed coming, and that it would be shaped more to my "new" foot, but I was worried. 
 
I received the new orthotic last week, and went straight to play tennis. I had hit on the ball machine a few days before, but only lasted about 20 min because the ball of my foot was quite sore. But Thursday, new orthotic (with the Morton's extension under the big toe) made an enormous difference. I knew it would help, but wow.
 
Long story to say, yeah, find a doctor who knows, and  go get it fixed -- you've done some things, obviously, but this new footbed is so nice... My foot will never be pain-free, and I won't be running any marathons, but I think I will be able to do a lot more than I could the past 5 years or so. 
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

UPDATE

 

I saw a PT who specializes in orthotics this last week. After two appointments in two days, I will have the first draft of new orthotics to try in my shoes, and then we will either make a new pair for skiing, or work with the existing ones to address the issues we found. After, having previous inserts for my shoes made by two different "specialists," I was flabbergasted and impressed with the amount of time (4 hours between two appointments), resources (video recording of me walking, standing, balancing, etc., and then evaluating it in slow motion), and conversation (regarding where and when it hurts ranging from my feet to my neck) that have gone into this process. She even asked to see my Chiropractor's x-rays to determine if my issues were limited to below the hips or not.

 

Now, as I put on my boots, I wonder if the canting to the outside by the slope-side boot-fitter was really necessary, or was it an attempt to correct the inadequate functioning of the "custom footbeds" that were made when I bought the boots?

 

I will update with photos when I get the new orthotics with the first attempt to accommodate the Morton's Toe. By the way, I was told we have a six month timeframe in which to send the appliances back for replacement and adjustment to get them right. AWESOME!

post #6 of 6

Now that sounds like customer service.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Footbed Failure and Morton's Toe