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Future patrolman looking for skis - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


That's an intersting story. That intervention (applied pressure to a fracture to induce adrenalin) certainly isn't in any protocol that I've seen. Where did she pick that up - JAMA?

 

That's just the layman's version- it's far more complex, but I get lost in the explanation fairly quickly. I have no idea where she picked it up, perhaps from her days in Shock Trauma.You wouldn't believe what comes through the door. Or maybe you would... The point is, just bare hands and some training saved the girl until the ambulance arrived. Using a jolt of pain as a kick start seemed pretty smart to me, and kinda funny. She went to the ICU with a liver lac, punctured lung, some broken bones and a concussion. It was a week before Christmas. 

post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Crab View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

That's an intersting story. That intervention (applied pressure to a fracture to induce adrenalin) certainly isn't in any protocol that I've seen. Where did she pick that up - JAMA?

That's just the layman's version- it's far more complex, but I get lost in the explanation fairly quickly. I have no idea where she picked it up, perhaps from her days in Shock Trauma.You wouldn't believe what comes through the door. Or maybe you would... The point is, just bare hands and some training saved the girl until the ambulance arrived. Using a jolt of pain as a kick start seemed pretty smart to me, and kinda funny. She went to the ICU with a liver lac, punctured lung, some broken bones and a concussion. It was a week before Christmas. 

Ah, so she was in the Shock Trauma section. Back to your original post, most MDs haven't got that kind of background. Over the years of patrolling I have had a handful of doctors at an injury scene, and none of them could do a decent job of prehospital assessment or treatment on-hill. They were neurologists and psychiatrists and oncologists...but they were doctors.

I've also had two times where doctors didn't identify themselves, they just watched me treat their partners and followed us down. I was surprised (and proud) in the aid room when they told me they were doctors but didn't see any reason to jump in. Just sayin'.
post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 

Hey thanks. Great to hear from people who are patrollers. I'm going to make contact with those volunteer patrols and get NSP membership so I can take an OEC class. Does anyone know of a good boot fitter in socal?

 

Also, interesting story about adrenaline. Those fine critical moments are why medicine is an art form as much as it is a science. It's so cool when off-duty physicians do amazing things like that, your wife must be a great doctor.

post #34 of 44
post #35 of 44

Skiing skill level varies enormously depending on whether you're a volunteer (National Ski Patrol) or professional.  It also varies enormously, especially for volunteers, depending on the size and difficulty of the mountain. A friend of mine is at best an intermediate skier but a very small hill near Tahoe is happy to have him as a volunteer. Squaw--not so much.

 

Mr. Crab--I'm glad your wife was able to save that young girl's life.  It also sounds like she had the good sense to get out of the way once the EMT's arrived.  Here's another story--when I was a med student at Michigan one of the fourth year students arrived at an accident scene to find a victim having trouble breathing and about to arrest.  They performed a cricothyroidotomy.  It didn't do much for the patient's tension pneumothorax. Here's another story--in Arizona a dentist at an accident scene told the EMT's that the patient's airway was compromised and they should be transported by ambulance where they could be suctioned, and not by helicopter--which could only transport the patient strapped to a skid (it was a long time ago). The police on the scene arrested the dentist for interfering. The patient went by chopper and died. In France doctors ride on ambulances. When Diana was injured I recall that it took a very long time at the scene before she was transported--maybe an hour? Some people felt that the desire of doctors to treat her at the scene might have cost her her life. And here's another one--when I was a resident a patient came into the VA hospital where I was working at night with a ruptured aneurysm, in extremis. There were no OR nurses or techs on call. I was fully capable of operating on a ruptured aneurysm. What neither I nor any of the other surgeons on duty could do was find and lay out the instruments in time. In general, we are all good at what we do, especially when we do it in familiar surroundings, and not so good at doing what other people do. Make of these stories what you will. 

 

Back to OP--if you want to go to med school get straight A's, take an MCAT study course if you can, do research and as many extracurricular activities that might relate to helping humanity as you can, if you take a year off don't spend it as a ski bum, apply to as many schools as you can afford to, be prepared to apply for a couple of years, and accept the fact that it's a lottery.  This is all bullshit and marginally related--if at all-to being a good doc, but it's what you have to do. (Oh, and think about establishing residence in a state that has a lot of state school spots for residents--like Texas. In California you're screwed.

post #36 of 44
Thread Starter 

I did all of that + have done much research, volunteering, extracurriculars. I don't see the need to keep working/doing things to get in. Obviously ski patrol will help get me in but that's not why I want to do it.

 

That being said, it looks like I will end up going the NSP route (taking the OEC class first) then getting on a volunteer patrol. Thanks for the feedback everyone.

post #37 of 44
Good luck. I'm really impressed with the quality & quantity of advice here, especially from the patrollers. Its been an education for everyone, not just the OP...I'm always happy to see patrol on the mountain, for all you do, snow safety, and dropping ropes. All I can add- or second, is clock lots of time on the hill, everything starts with boots, Intuition liners for all day comfort and warmth, and skis in the 100 - 107 width for versatility.

We have a doc friend who patrolled at Snowbird for several years. Seems like the whole U of U medical staff skis at Alta.
Edited by Mr. Crab - 9/24/13 at 8:41pm
post #38 of 44

One other thing about skis for patrol or teaching--you don't want graphics that might offend the customers--naked women, monsters dripping blood, etc. They won't let you use them in uniform.

post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

One other thing about skis for patrol or teaching--you don't want graphics that might offend the customers--naked women, monsters dripping blood, etc. They won't let you use them in uniform.

 

I've never heard about a problem with ski graphics.  There was a popular sticker going around that got banned...  "Tip Your Kids Ski Instructor".  My skis are always covered in snow so the graphics seem to be irrelevant.

 

I got some cool stickers this year...  "Happy To Be Here".  They are from a former Blue Angels pilot.  The blue and gold sticker will look great on my yellow and black Soul7s.

post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

 

I've never heard about a problem with ski graphics.  There was a popular sticker going around that got banned...  "Tip Your Kids Ski Instructor".  My skis are always covered in snow so the graphics seem to be irrelevant.

 

I got some cool stickers this year...  "Happy To Be Here".  They are from a former Blue Angels pilot.  The blue and gold sticker will look great on my yellow and black Soul7s.

 

My son was teaching the 3-4 year olds one year. He couldn't use skis that had the profile of a nude woman on them. Obviously it depends on the resort and perhaps the job of the employee. I could see it being a problem at a place like Squaw, which has grooming standards for patrol. (BTW-for some reason I've never seen patrol riding anything but mainstream skis with conservative graphics. Wonder why.)

post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

 

My son was teaching the 3-4 year olds one year. He couldn't use skis that had the profile of a nude woman on them. Obviously it depends on the resort and perhaps the job of the employee. I could see it being a problem at a place like Squaw, which has grooming standards for patrol. (BTW-for some reason I've never seen patrol riding anything but mainstream skis with conservative graphics. Wonder why.)

 

Was that the Rossi Scratch?  I always loved that graphic.

post #42 of 44
Thread Starter 

Thanks, I was actually planning on having conservative skis/presentation. And Mammoth too-- they require staff be clean-shaven.

post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifreemonster View Post
 

Thanks, I was actually planning on having conservative skis/presentation. And Mammoth too-- they require staff be clean-shaven.

Squaw used to require patrol to be clean shaven (at least on the face), but KSL now allows neatly trimmed beards. Alpine Meadows patrol is easily mistaken for Taliban.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

 

Was that the Rossi Scratch?  I always loved that graphic.

 

Yes. I was trying to think of that last night. Thanks for the reminder. It was a cool graphic.

post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Squaw used to require patrol to be clean shaven (at least on the face), but KSL now allows neatly trimmed beards. Alpine Meadows patrol is easily mistaken for Taliban.

 

Yes. I was trying to think of that last night. Thanks for the reminder. It was a cool graphic.

 

Rossi Scratch is OK here.  Beards and other facial hair are OK if "neatly" trimmed.  Facal hair has to be in before the season starts.

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