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Advanced Women's Skis

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
My girlfriend's an advanced skier, 5-7, 150 - comfortable on blues and blacks, nervous on double blacks. She avoids the bumps, but loves to carve up the groomers and heads for the powder when it's out there. Unfortunately, since we generally ski in the Northeast there usually isn't all that much of it.

She's looking to buy a women's ski and could use a little help. She's had good experiences with K2 in the past, and right now she's leaning toward the K2 T:Nine Spire. But she's also thinking about the Volkl Energy 420 Gamma and the K2 T:Nine X. Any thoughts or insight would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
post #2 of 9
A novice opinin here. Just what I picked up on my search for skis. I thought most serious women skiers stayed away from skis that were gender specific. I understood that by design women skis were geared towards the less aggressive and these cancelled out the expert crowd. Just a thought hopefully this will bump you up a bit and others will respond.
post #3 of 9
I thought I read this before. Have her try the Volkl's.
The AX2 may be a possibility also.

[ January 07, 2004, 10:19 AM: Message edited by: Max Capacity ]
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I posted this here and then then reposted it on the general board because I thought it might be more appropriate there. Thanks all for the input all. The test is this weekend: Volkl AX3 Gamma v. Rossi B1W (the Rossi was highly recommended by the ski shop and a few friends who also have the ski.) We'll post a review when it's over.

As far as women's skis in general go, I think it all comes down to a split between what skis are "supposed" to be and what they actually are. I guess women's skis are "supposed" to be lesser than men's skis, but she's a serious skier who joins me all over the mountain and has tried a variety of unisex and women's skis over the years. In general she's had a better time on women's skis, which is why she's focusing on the upper echelon of that variety now that she's buying a pair. But there are a lot of preconceived notions out there about skis that can be blown away by experience. For example, Ski mag rates the Volkl Supersport 5-star and 724 AX3 as "player" skis, meaning they're supposed to be for beginner to intermediate skiers, but I've yet to come across anyone who says these are starter skis regardless of what Ski magazine says. My thinking essentially is, if you like something and it works for you, stick with it and don't worry about what it's supposed to be.
post #5 of 9
I think we did respond to this elsewhere but this one drifted off differently...

Quote:
Originally posted by Rebecca:
A novice opinin here. Just what I picked up on my search for skis. I thought most serious women skiers stayed away from skis that were gender specific. I understood that by design women skis were geared towards the less aggressive and these cancelled out the expert crowd. Just a thought hopefully this will bump you up a bit and others will respond.
Generally, especially in the past, yes. Most expert women ski on men's skis because in the past, "womens" skis have been pretty weak. But K2 stepped up recently and started actually making skis for expert women. I own a pair of Phat Luvs for my tree/storm skis and they work really well. I still prefer my G4s for crud busting and high speeds, but the Phat Luv is a really good ski. I've heard the Spire is an excellent ski, but it's skinnier than I have a need for - I suspect it would be an excellent ski for the east coast though.

I think Volkl's women's series (used to be 20/20, now gamma) is worth a look, especially for women who are short and/or very lightweight. I have a 5'3" friend who really likes hers.

Rossi's women's line (demoed a few) felt like they're oriented more towards beginners/intermediates. Even their website puts the B2(mens ski) as an "Expert" ski and the women's version of the same ski as an "Advanced" (read intermediate since the only other category is beginner) ski. I understand that there's probably a bigger market for women's beginner and intermediate skis, but I'd like to see something for expert women too.

Anyway, I'm glad to see that at least a few manufacturers (esp. K2) seem to be going in the right direction with women's gear.

[ January 07, 2004, 11:01 AM: Message edited by: altagirl ]
post #6 of 9
I have the Volkl V3 20/20's. I absolutely love these skis. I ski every condition on them. Usually, by my third season on a pair of skis I'm ready for new ones, not these.

I've been skiing women's ski's ever since Olin came out with the DTV and I will never go back to a unisex ski.

BTW, I'm 5'2" and 105lbs. Why would I want to ski a ski meant for someone 200 lbs?

Kathi
post #7 of 9
My wife is around your friends size and she is an advanced skier.

She bent 2 pairs of Volkl Carver Motion 20/20s last year. These were not bends from misuse or wipeouts either. She now has Atomic R10 womens and lives them. They rip on groomers and are nice in Eastern powder but are stiff for bumps.

I would not put an aggressive woman or advanced skier that weighs 150 pounds and skis the whole mountain on any Volkl 20/20 except maybe the old vertigo 20/20 model.

It's not that they can't take it or will break but they tend to bounce around more in uneven conditions.

If you like the fact that women skis are mounted differently, get an Atomic with the varizone binding so it can be moved based on her center of gravity.

Many ski companies now market skis to women that are actually the same construction as the unisex ski but with a more forward mounting point and graphics.
post #8 of 9
My wife is about the same size and I switched her from 175 cm Fischer Big Stix 75 to a 170 cm Head Monster IM 75. She loves to rip the groomed, loves powder, generally avoids moguls and doesn't mind the the firm stuff.

In every category the Head IM 75 is far superior. If your friend has not been on all-mountian/mid fat skis, the 75mm waist adds to stability on groomers and float in soft stuff....usually much desired. First impressions of the IM 75, the skis seem heavy. However, an advanced skier that carves turns will love the solid feeling, smooth entry into the turns and turn release. They are actually very nimble for a carver. The 18 meter radius makes for a good all mountain tool. The grip on ice is nothing short of amazing!

Demo a pair...if she wants something a little quicker then try the Head Monster IM 70...this is almost the same ski with a narrower waist and shorter turn radius with the same confidence inspiring smooth, stable, solid feel.

Enjoy!

David

[ January 28, 2004, 12:59 PM: Message edited by: dsgould ]
post #9 of 9
I have the Volkl 20/20 Vertigo Motion skis. I like them. However, I tried Atomic R-10W and I think they are better than the Volkls.

Try the R-10W!

Nancy
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