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Lessons for a 4 year old - Page 2

post #31 of 43
Children's Specialist is not a cert, it's an accreditation. In Rocky Mtn. Division, there's CS1 and CS2. CS1 may be required now for LII. I know CS2 is required for LIII.
post #32 of 43
A bunch of ours have this listed in their certs list, some with levels showing.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

PSIA-E is now requiring Children's Specialist certification for Level IIs and Level IIIs.  In other words, you can't get LII or LIII if you don't have the Children's Specialist first.  Previously certified LIIs and LIIIs are grandfathered in without it.  I don't know about other PSIA divisions.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Children's Specialist is not a cert, it's an accreditation. In Rocky Mtn. Division, there's CS1 and CS2. CS1 may be required now for LII. I know CS2 is required for LIII.

 

A bit off topic, but does getting CS1 or CS2 require a test on snow or just a written test?  Last season I learned about the gap between L1 and L2 in a discussion more about adults.  Now it sounds like there is another aspect to the gap for children who are beyond beginners.

post #34 of 43

They both require both.  Online exam needs to be passed(isn't easy), a workbook with I think 80 questions needs to be turned in the morning of the first day or you are sent home.  Then you spend two days going through it all on snow.  To me it felt like there was teaching and examing going on the entire time.

 

I would expect that most of the L2/3's out there will take the courses even though they are grandfathered in, since there is a continuing education requirement to PSIA.

 

Granted I'm still a bit new to the whole instructing/coaching aspect (and skiing in general for that matter) but CS1 is pretty tough.  In my group, I believe I was the only one that wasn't either a teacher (as in grade school or hs) or councilor and some were struggling more than me.  If anyone thinks they can cruise through a workbook in a weekend and take the online test and pass it (like I did when I signed up), you are sadly mistaken.  I'm sure there are folks that could, but they have led a much different life of most others doing this part time.  I ended taking a couple months studying here and there when I could (I think there are three books all together).  I think I whinned about this in a post last year.

 

The good news is that according to the Examiner I had, he said if you can pass CS1, L2 teaching should be easy.

 

Though the most difficult so far, also the most rewarding.

 

Ken

post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
 

[snip]

 

The good news is that according to the Examiner I had, he said if you can pass CS1, L2 teaching should be easy.

 

Though the most difficult so far, also the most rewarding.

 

Ken

Thanks for sharing details of your experience.  Maybe I'll start a thread sometime with other related questions.  As a parent, it's interesting to learn what goes into certification and accreditation.  I understand that there are good instructors who don't take the tests for a variety of reasons.  But for those families going someplace new or just getting started in with kid lessons, asking a ski school about instructor qualifications may be of interest.

post #36 of 43
I'm brand new here- but we were discussing the same thing for my soon to be four year old at WP. We ended up getting the 5 lesson add on to a season pass for her rather than the 5 weekly lessons. It was only a little more $ and we figure it gives us a lot more flexibility in terms of birthday parties, sickness or something. Last year at 2/3 we got her out 12 days 3 of which were lessons. She loved the just because I'm three program at WP and has been begging to go back to ski school all summer long.

Good luck!
post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by missmoonrocket View Post

I'm brand new here- but we were discussing the same thing for my soon to be four year old at WP. We ended up getting the 5 lesson add on to a season pass for her rather than the 5 weekly lessons. It was only a little more $ and we figure it gives us a lot more flexibility in terms of birthday parties, sickness or something. Last year at 2/3 we got her out 12 days 3 of which were lessons. She loved the just because I'm three program at WP and has been begging to go back to ski school all summer long.

Good luck!

 

Welcome to EpicSki!  That sounds like a great option for younger kids who live near WP.  Hadn't heard of the idea before.

post #38 of 43

The other benefit to us of being able to choose when we use the 5 days is for continuity from last year we can still do one or two more in the just because I'm three program (and at least last year she got a full day private for being the only level 4 3yo that was there) before her birthday.  Then spread out the remainder as we get stuck on a skill - or it's a really good powder day and we just want to play :-)

 

BTW- We found the best learning area for her when she was mastering the snowplow was the Galloping Goose at Mary Jane.  Just enough pitch to keep them going without getting stuck and not too crowded- with pretty easy lodge access.  Great parent hand off point too.

post #39 of 43
Quote:
 Kneale really hit on my greatest concern that an all-day (8:45am-2:30pm) lesson might be too long for a 4 year old.  That said, Marznc experience gives me confidence in that his daughter sounds much like my son - loves preschool, social, etc. 

 

Typically an "all day" program like that is not drilling the kids out on the snow for 6 hours.  There would be lots of breaks, lunch, etc. -- even more so for very young kids.  But if the child isn't used to being away from their parents all day, of course that could become an issue.  If they're used to going to preschool, etc. already then they will probably be fine.

 

I definitely advise against focusing on specific developmental goals.  Every kid develops both physically and mentally at their own pace.  At that age the emphasis should just be on being out there and having fun on the mountain (IMVHO).  As long as they want to keep going back you're doing fine, and skills will come with mileage.  Depending on the focus of the program it might not be a whole lot more than vaguely ski-related daycare at that age group -- not that this is necessarily a bad thing, but if you EXPECT a focus on actually teaching skiing skills you should make sure everyone is on the same page.

 

Teaching your own kids can be done, but it's not for everyone.  Much like teaching a friend or SO, a lot of the difficulty comes from the dynamics of the existing relationship.  A teacher who is a neutral third party (even if they're not a professional ski instructor) can be an advantage in itself.  Then on top of that you may have a very good skier who no longer remembers what it was like to first be starting out or how to explain very basic technique or how to figure out why the 'student' is struggling.

post #40 of 43

I would go with the 5 week program.  Consistency and repetition are important, especially with young kids.  At least that's what I read, and my experience with my daughter certainly bears that out.  I think the 3 week would be ending just as the lessons have become part of your son's routine.

 

As others have said, I agree that the top priority is having fun.

 

My daughter will be 4 this weekend, last season we did a 6 week weekly lesson (45 minutes, with parent participation) at our local hill.  The first 3 weeks were really good, her instructor was a mother who had experience with that age group and a knack for adjusting drills quickly based on what was working and not working.  Then we had a couple of substitutes who were not as in tune with the class.  Still good overall, all time on snow is good in my book, but more just supervised skiing than lessons the last two weeks.  We also took her to the mountain regularly when we were skiing and practiced turning and stopping in the magic carpet learning area.

 

My wife and I are trying to figure out the best options for lessons this season ourselves.  The best part though is that my daughter has been telling us she can't wait til it snows so she can go skiing.

post #41 of 43
PSIA-RM, which includes Colorado, is now requiring Children Specialist I and II for Cert levels II and III. The CS2 exam is very comprehensive and informative. I learned so much while preparing for and completing the CS2. It's definitely worth seeking out an instructor with this credential.
post #42 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by skimomola View Post

PSIA-RM, which includes Colorado, is now requiring Children Specialist I and II for Cert levels II and III. The CS2 exam is very comprehensive and informative. I learned so much while preparing for and completing the CS2. It's definitely worth seeking out an instructor with this credential.

Appreciate your interest.  This thread started a year ago, but other parents will read it sooner or later.  LF noted earlier that PSIA-E requires CS certification for higher levels.

post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

Appreciate your interest.  This thread started a year ago, but other parents will read it sooner or later.  LF noted earlier that PSIA-E requires CS certification for higher levels.

I think all PSIA divisions are doing this.
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