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Colorado floods - Page 2

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

 

Yeah, I heard this morning that parts of Julesburg were being evac'd .... JULESBURG??? That pretty much is Nebraska.

 

If we leave after work for Colorado we will stay over night in Fort Morgan/Brush.  My wife was telling me the Comfort Inn where we stay sometimes was evacuated.  That part of Colorado just doesn't seem like your typical flood zone.

post #32 of 59

Check out all the road closures from http://cotrip.org/roadConditions.htm?zoomPresetId=5

 

All the flood water is flowing NE up the South Platte along I-76 to Nebraska.  So much water fell in the mountains and along the front range it's causing flooding all the way to Nebraska.  A few days ago I heard they didn't expect the flooding to get that far East.  I think this is so unprecedented they don't really know how far it will go.

 

The water has receded in the mountains, so all those closed roads are damaged or destroyed.  There is no way into Estes Park or Lyons, and little hope there will be any time soon.

 

On a less important note, the good news for us skiers is there will be little impact on skiing.  Eldora was the only ski area in the flood zone, and it didn't have any damage:

http://snocountry.com/snonews/ski-resort-news/snonews-featured-stories/entry/eldora-i-70-spared-from-damage-by-colorado-floods

 

How soon access is restored to Eldora from Boulder is the big question.  It's currently a 3-4 hour drive, for what normally is 30 mins up Boulder Canyon.  They are saying it will be at least a month to fix the road.   From the pics I've seen I'll be surprised if it's open by ski season.  I'll bet they only get one lane with traffic alternating each direction open for the winter.

http://www.dailycamera.com/news/boulder-flood/ci_24107210/nederland-officials-warn-residents-that-boulder-canyon-could

post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

Well guys, I'm not sure, but I think you've out disastered Irene.

 

 

Luckily, Vermont is providing assistance in planning the road rebuilding here. Their knowledge of dealing with a lot of county roads will be invaluable.

post #34 of 59

This is so big of a flood that it deserves its own name. Any suggestions beside #COFlood ?

post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

This is so big of a flood that it deserves its own name. Any suggestions beside #COFlood ?

Perhaps "The Great WaterFall of 2013"??

post #36 of 59

Floodorado  

 

Hope it does not sound like it is trivializing such a calamitous event.

post #37 of 59

Rocky Mountain Wet :-(

post #38 of 59

Now that they seem to be getting a handle on the situation, what kind of impacts did these storms have in the ski resort infrastructure?  I'd think that biblical flooding like this could wash out the ground around the concrete moorings around the lift towers and bullwheel supports at the bases.  On the good side, the retaining ponds for making snow should be in great shape.

post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

 

On a less important note, the good news for us skiers is there will be little impact on skiing.  Eldora was the only ski area in the flood zone, and it didn't have any damage:

http://snocountry.com/snonews/ski-resort-news/snonews-featured-stories/entry/eldora-i-70-spared-from-damage-by-colorado-floods

 

How soon access is restored to Eldora from Boulder is the big question.  It's currently a 3-4 hour drive, for what normally is 30 mins up Boulder Canyon.  They are saying it will be at least a month to fix the road.   From the pics I've seen I'll be surprised if it's open by ski season.  I'll bet they only get one lane with traffic alternating each direction open for the winter.

http://www.dailycamera.com/news/boulder-flood/ci_24107210/nederland-officials-warn-residents-that-boulder-canyon-could

 

Thanks for posting that, I was wondering .......didn;t ask because it is  far less important in lifes scheme than loss of life, livelyhood or property....

post #40 of 59

 

The senior v.p. whose department I used to work for (who recently retired before I was laid off) has a vacation home outside of Estes Park. He was in Colorado Springs at the time of the flood, but his neighbor sent him this picture.

 

My wife worked here one summer during college.

post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

This is so big of a flood that it deserves its own name. Any suggestions beside #COFlood ?

 

I think I'd give it the same name as the villain from KickAss2.

post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Now that they seem to be getting a handle on the situation, what kind of impacts did these storms have in the ski resort infrastructure?  I'd think that biblical flooding like this could wash out the ground around the concrete moorings around the lift towers and bullwheel supports at the bases.  On the good side, the retaining ponds for making snow should be in great shape.

The CO "Front Range" ski areas are generally along the continental divide (Eldora the noted exception). So by that definition, they are in headwaters areas so any impacts of very heavy regional rain are felt as the tributaries aggregate and eventually run down canyons to the plains. I imagine the resorts deal with heavier runoff in localized thunderstorms, and even then it just runs off the same channels as snowmelt.
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joal View Post
 

Floodorado

 

Hope it does not sound like it is trivializing such a calamitous event.

 

 

No, it doesn't trivialize it. I like that one--Floodorado.

 

I saw a list of funny tweets about the flood that's intention was to lighten the mood.

 

My favorite was that Weld County wanted to secede and now it is it's own island. (I live there and know people impacted by the floods, but they appreciated the laugh.) And another tweet was asking if weed floats.

post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

 

 And another tweet was asking if weed floats.

well, for levity, with news noting water content ... "What is in this ***t, man?  ... Mostly Maui Waui man, but it's got some Labrador in it"

 

post #45 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post

This is so big of a flood that it deserves its own name. Any suggestions beside #COFlood ?

Since front range weatherfolk like to refer to our summer rains as "monsoon" season, how about Monsoon Oscar? The alphabetical naming of storms probably will never get to "O", so that name should last forever.
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

This is so big of a flood that it deserves its own name. Any suggestions beside #COFlood ?

 

Ragnarok?

post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

This is so big of a flood that it deserves its own name. Any suggestions beside #COFlood ?

 

Ragnarok?

 

Only if Hel* has been watching Flower Tucci films. 

 

 

 

*yes, that is spelled correctly.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hel_(being)

post #48 of 59

post #49 of 59

Vail Resorts just announced a $100,000 donation to the Colorado Red Cross for flood relief.

This weekend is their volunteer Echo Day and they have 350 people lined up in Broomfield to help efforts in Boulder County.

post #50 of 59

Good news: a route into Estes Park opened today.  

 

Bad news: it's a long drive around the back way and the main roads from the front range will likely be closed for months.

 

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_24125017/colorado-7-opens-estes-park-town-braces-lost

 

Every canyon North of Golden remains closed due to major road damage, and will be for some time, possibly months.  Here's a map showing the road closures and the route now open to Estes Park from Golden.

 

post #51 of 59

Reminds of the big flood we had here 2 years ago on the Missouri River after the snow melt in the mountains (although our flood crept in slowly and stuck around for weeks).

 


Edited by MidwestPete - 9/19/13 at 12:52pm
post #52 of 59

And they had to close Trail Ridge Road last night due to snow (it has since reopened.)

post #53 of 59
post #54 of 59

^^^^ Unbelievable photos.  This one really caught my eye:

 

 

From the "It could have been much worse" department, it's awesome all the major reservoirs worked as designed in this once in a lifetime test.   I'd guess a lot emergency overflow spillways were used for the first time in decades, if ever.  The loss of life downstream if one of those dams break would be just unthinkable.  


Edited by tball - 9/21/13 at 2:15pm
post #55 of 59

I was waiting for those photos to be released publically. Scary and impressive.

 

Some major roads between little towns were opened today so that is a good thing. A few 15 minute drives had become 1.5 hour drives.

post #56 of 59

Satellite photos pretty amazing, gives a good idea of the mess.   I feel for the folks affected.  It takes years for things to settle out with insurance, FEMA, etc.  Many just don't move back which in ways may be best in long run but changes whole neighborhoods, schools, etc.

post #57 of 59

 A friend went fishing on the Platte River here in Nebraska and sent me this photo.

 

photo by F. Daharsh

post #58 of 59

K's parents when home to McCook recently. Hwy 34 was washed out in places apparently. Far reaching destruction.

 

Have we seen the last of it?

post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post
 

Have we seen the last of it?

 

Are we counting things like hypothetical seep-loosened rockfalls?

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