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Quality issues with Tyrolia Adrenalin bindings - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesnower View Post
 


First of all, I completely agree with you. The Tyrolia bindings are a bad copy of thye first concept of Marker products.

Secondly, don't trust at all about the positive reviews about Head product in internet social network or forum when you don't really know the author.

Head has a lot of "hidden" promoters that put good reviews and comments in social networks. At least this is the situation in the European forums.

Thirdly, I bought an Adrenaline and after 2 days it starts to lose the settings and during a descent I lost 1 skis without any reason.

Your first post is telling folks NOT to buy a product based on anonymous reviews by people on the internet, then give a negative review.

 

That's ironic. I like you.

post #32 of 49

Usually negative review is given by normal people after the use of the product and they don't have interests in says the thruth.

Positive review otherwise are written by "hidden" promoters, they have interests to sell.

Head is leader in doing this. Products are very good but I don't like their strategies, I prefer to see clear banners o promoted links, etc.

post #33 of 49

It sounds like the break could not have been prevented by any other binding.   From the descriptions above, it sounds like the force that broke the bone was not in the direction of the heel release, and the twisting of the foot jammed the boot toe into the toe piece preventing release.  I think you would still have broken you leg in any binding, except for the marker bindings with the much maligned marker "ejecto-matic" toe piece (I forget the actual name for that particular toe-piece). 

post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesnower View Post
 


First of all, I completely agree with you. The Tyrolia bindings are a bad copy of thye first concept of Marker products.

Secondly, don't trust at all about the positive reviews about Head product in internet social network or forum when you don't really know the author.

Head has a lot of "hidden" promoters that put good reviews and comments in social networks. At least this is the situation in the European forums.

Thirdly, I bought an Adrenaline and after 2 days it starts to lose the settings and during a descent I lost 1 skis without any reason.

 

 

Have you actually held both in your hands? Taken them apart? Can you explain the very significant differences in the system and how the lock down modes function? This is what I know about the current frame 'side country' bindings. They all work pretty well. The marker system moves the binding into lock mode. The switch is underfoot. The Salomon/Atomic binding and the Tyrolia release behind the heel piece. The Salomon latches are under the heel piece and are vertically aligned. The Tyrolia, on the side and horizontally aligned. This allows the plate to travel a bit with the flex of the ski. All three are very different in this regard. All three toe pieces are relatively similar. I've lost a ski in every brand of binding, including telemark, that I've ever owned, 99.9% as designed as a function in a fall. Pre-release is almost always due to snow build up on the boot. It sounds like yours might have had a forward tension setting issue. You haven't told us if you were using a DIN sole, or an AT boot. As much as you're accusing Tyrolia/Head of, you need to clarify the circumstances of your issue. In the end, there are no bad bindings here, only preferences.

post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesnower View Post
 

Usually negative review is given by normal people after the use of the product and they don't have interests in says the thruth.

Positive review otherwise are written by "hidden" promoters, they have interests to sell.

Head is leader in doing this. Products are very good but I don't like their strategies, I prefer to see clear banners o promoted links, etc.

 

 

Post #2 from you, both bad mouthing a particular product. hmmmmmm.  

post #36 of 49

I see David has not replied to answer my questions, which makes me suspicious.

 

I've now had an opportunity to try the Adrenalin.  I'm 1.80m tall and weigh 83kg.  I ski 60+ times a season and have done so for 35 years.  I would rate myself a category 3+ skier (Level 9), spending most of my time on single and double diamond runs when in bounds.

 

My Adrenalins (Elan) are mounted on a pair of '12 Elan Olympus Mons.  I would describe these as medium fat skis.  Dimensions are 140mm tip, 110mm waist and 130mm tail.  Length is 183cm.  DIN setting = 10.

 

Due to a lack of natural snow, I've only skied frontside groomed runs so far.

 

I've experienced no problems with the bindings thus far.  As I've said before, their really just an alpine binding mounted on a plate that pivots about the toe.

 

So far so good.

post #37 of 49
Joe... Are you passing through euro land by chance, or am I confusing you with someone else?

I'm sympathetic to David's situation. A lost season, an injury that will require time, a psychological aspect that most likely will outlive the biological injury-- that's always tough to deal with.

But it sounds like he's in the hot/angry part of the aftermath, where emotions run ahead of slow, considered thought. If the binding screwed up, keep it, document all testing (with video!), and pursue legal action. Bindings are indemnified when set up according to protocol. That's a much better way to make sure a real defect--if there is one, as unlikely as it probably is-- gets taken off the market and fixed. You may also get some recourse for your medical bills, pain, and suffering. But, be prepared to find out that the binding worked properly. And that it was set correctly. People get freak injuries every season on properly set up, non defective gear. It does happen, and bindings are no panacea.

There are so many factors involved. And one person's retelling of a traumatic event he could not actually see happening is not really enough to support that the binding didn't operate properly. I don't quite get the sticky snow thing and perfect landing. Dense snow and a perfect landing results in staying on top. Light snow and a perfect landing isn't sticky and you emerge. Sounds to me more like you landed too far over the toes... Or you caught something under the snow that caught you (stumps and branches and hidden tree trunks are responsible for plent of broken legs skiing). In any case, if there is some crazy design flaw we will start getting lots of reports of broken legs from these bindings. If it was a one off defect in your pair, or a freak accident where the binding operate properly... We won't.
post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by justruss View Post

Joe... Are you passing through euro land by chance, or am I confusing you with someone else?

No - but have done so many times in the past.  Deloitte?  Andersen?

post #39 of 49
I am on my second season on the adrenalin 16. I have no affiliation with the manufacturer, though I do get wholesale pricing as a manufacturer myself. I could choose any binding company and get the same deal, and I have skied Dukes for years.

I have had no issues whatsoever, and have found them to ski very well, tour well and release appropriately. I regularly recommend them.
post #40 of 49

Ok. I cannot sit back and listen to this back and forth. First of all to David, I am very sorry for your injury. What I am really wondering as a former professional ski technician is why this binding was not release checked prior to your first trip? You should be able to get a copy of the check if you go to the ski shop.  If it was tested properly it would have protected you. Did you mount these bindings yourself? Did you drive with the skis on your roof rack without protection for the bindings on the way to the mountain? I cannot tell you how many times I have tested skis that the customers did nothing to protect the bindings. Road Salt is a nightmare and I have torque tested bindings so far outside the normal range that looked brand new. I would highly recommend two things at the end of every season. 1. Crank the Din settings to 0 to release the springs in the bindings and 2. Have an annual release check completed. $25 release check is worth much more than 1000's in hospital bills. I cannot understand how a brand new binding mounted at a reputable shop would have allowed this to happen. Simply put I think David may have a serious issue with the shop (or himself) for not properly installing the binding. The manufacturer will argue that it has to be properly inspected and tested at an authorized dealer. It perplexes me how people can purchase bindings (a life and limb safety device) on the internet, take it home, mount it themselves  and not release check the bindings. A release check requires DIN settings to be torque tested in every possible release. The fall that David had is a standard test. It would have shown it's true colors if this test had been completed prior to ever getting on the mountain. My two cents, but certainly hope this helps someone else avoid David's misfortune. David, be prepared to present this professional release check if you are proceeding with legal action. Without that information in hand and a follow up test of the binding I think you will have a big mountain to climb with your claims. If you can demonstrate that the binding was professionally installed, tested and then a subsequent test showing it won't release, i think that the manufacturer should do something for you. Without all these items in hand it will be difficult for you to claim anything.

post #41 of 49
Tho, the OP was a two post wonder. He had an agenda, got called on, and disappeared.
post #42 of 49
I don't think you mean the OP, which was Pacobillie. Who is not a two post wonder.
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I don't think you mean the OP, which was Pacobillie. Who is not a two post wonder.

Correct... Sorry bout that... The two poster was thesnower.
post #44 of 49

Mosts likely he was a competitors rep from another manufacturer trying to scare people. I have never tested a binding out of the box that did not function properly. These things simply do not leave the factory locked down so they can't function. Too much liability involved for the manufacturer. I have visited the Tyrolia binding factory and they have the ability to look for defects in materials by serial number. If the bindings are going to fail they typically have material fatigue failure (premature release), which is rare. If David is for real, he should be able to gather the before and after release check data and share it with us all. Happy Holidays to everyone! 

post #45 of 49
Pretty odd if so. The local reps around here all seem to get on well enough that I can't imagine them doing or approving others doing something like thesnower. Everyone ends up working for someone they never thought they might at some point in their rep career. smile.gif
post #46 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by thodrinsky View Post
 

Ok. I cannot sit back and listen to this back and forth. First of all to David, I am very sorry for your injury. What I am really wondering as a former professional ski technician is why this binding was not release checked prior to your first trip? You should be able to get a copy of the check if you go to the ski shop.  If it was tested properly it would have protected you.

are you seriously claiming that if a binding is properly installed, adjusted, and tested one cannot be injured? If not--could you please clarify?

post #47 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

are you seriously claiming that if a binding is properly installed, adjusted, and tested one cannot be injured? If not--could you please clarify?

Old Goat. That is not what I stated. People get hurt skiing all the time. If you take the time to actually read David's post he clearly states that he fell forward. Not a backward twisting fall (common to injuries). Bindings cannot protect in every instance, that is a fact. You take a certain amount of personal risk when you ski, that is a fact. I was simply pointing out that his claims were a little off base, given his description of falling forward and not releasing properly. It's Christmas buddy. Relax, drink and be merry. 

post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Pretty odd if so. The local reps around here all seem to get on well enough that I can't imagine them doing or approving others doing something like thesnower. Everyone ends up working for someone they never thought they might at some point in their rep career. smile.gif

I agree. The ski industry is a small world. I am not in the field any longer, but made many life long friends. Hopefully its not a rep playing any funny games. 

post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by thodrinsky View Post
 

Ok. I cannot sit back and listen to this back and forth. First of all to David, I am very sorry for your injury. What I am really wondering as a former professional ski technician is why this binding was not release checked prior to your first trip? You should be able to get a copy of the check if you go to the ski shop.  If it was tested properly it would have protected you. Did you mount these bindings yourself? Did you drive with the skis on your roof rack without protection for the bindings on the way to the mountain? I cannot tell you how many times I have tested skis that the customers did nothing to protect the bindings. Road Salt is a nightmare and I have torque tested bindings so far outside the normal range that looked brand new. I would highly recommend two things at the end of every season. 1. Crank the Din settings to 0 to release the springs in the bindings and 2. Have an annual release check completed. $25 release check is worth much more than 1000's in hospital bills. I cannot understand how a brand new binding mounted at a reputable shop would have allowed this to happen. Simply put I think David may have a serious issue with the shop (or himself) for not properly installing the binding. The manufacturer will argue that it has to be properly inspected and tested at an authorized dealer. It perplexes me how people can purchase bindings (a life and limb safety device) on the internet, take it home, mount it themselves  and not release check the bindings. A release check requires DIN settings to be torque tested in every possible release. The fall that David had is a standard test. It would have shown it's true colors if this test had been completed prior to ever getting on the mountain. My two cents, but certainly hope this helps someone else avoid David's misfortune. David, be prepared to present this professional release check if you are proceeding with legal action. Without that information in hand and a follow up test of the binding I think you will have a big mountain to climb with your claims. If you can demonstrate that the binding was professionally installed, tested and then a subsequent test showing it won't release, i think that the manufacturer should do something for you. Without all these items in hand it will be difficult for you to claim anything.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thodrinsky View Post
 

 It's Christmas buddy. Relax, drink and be merry. 

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