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Salomon Lady ski edge angle

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

My wife has 2012 Salomon Lady skis.  I'd like to freshen up the edges.  What's the edge angle that has been set by the factory?  It says it's 1 degree here:  www.epicski.com/t/23494/list-of-recommended-base-edge-angles
and 2 degrees here:  www.jonsskituning.co.uk/content/view/31/41.  Thanks!
 

post #2 of 13

  OK...not sure here but I do remember Salomon skis coming with  1/1 from the factory, but it has been a while since I've tuned a new pair, so...IF you have a simple aluminum side edge bevel guide and a true bar you can lay the true bar across the top of the guide and lightly rest it on top of the side edge and check for light passing through. If there is none you've found your angle.

 

  If you only have a multi tool beveler you can take your finest file and lightly file a short section of edge (2 inches or less) somewhere along the mid-body of the ski (so it wont affect performance). Since it may be a 1 degree side, use a 2 degree angle on your guide. If when you do so, you observe material being removed towards the top of the edge (towards the sidewall, not the base) then it is probably a 1 degree. If it takes the material off uniformly then it is likely a 2...but remember to use light pressure. The small amount you remove if it is a 1 will not affect performance in any meaningful way.

 

   zenny

post #3 of 13

You can change side edge bevels at random. In other words you can increase to a 2 from a 1 with no issue and return to a 1 for a 2 with no issue and no grind necessary.

 

Just put a 2 degree side edge on them and call it a day.

 

She will never go back to a 1.

post #4 of 13

    ^^^^^^^Or you could do that!  Thumbs Up

 

      zenny


Edited by zentune - 9/14/13 at 6:10am
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

You can change side edge bevels at random. In other words you can increase to a 2 from a 1 with no issue and return to a 1 for a 2 with no issue and no grind necessary.

 

Just put a 2 degree side edge on them and call it a day.

 

She will never go back to a 1.

 

How about going from a 1 or a 2 to a 3?

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prosper View Post
 

 

How about going from a 1 or a 2 to a 3?

 

   

  With my profound apologies to Atomicman for answering for him (where for art thou, A-Man??? :D), you can also go to a 3 with no problems. Many think that the more acute a side edge angle becomes, the more grabby it is--this is not true. Side edge angles dictate edge grip, i.e. for firmer/icy snow conditions, so if you went to a 3 side it won't have any appreciable effect in softer conditions but when your wife gets on some firmer snow she will have better purchase when the skis are up on edge. It's the base edge bevel which dictates edge engagement, or how quickly the skis "hook up" when you roll from flat to on edge early in the turn. A lower base edge bevel (for instance 0.25, 0.5, or 0.7) can be hooky or grabby when running straight on flat surfaces without turning, like on a cat track because the base edge won't be as "raised" off of the snow surface--but she has a 1* which is standard so you're good there.

 

  Keep in mind though that the higher the degree you put on the side the more material you are taking off and that a 1 base and 2 side is by and large the industry standard for recreational skiing...

 

   zenny

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post
 

 

 

  With my profound apologies to Atomicman for answering for him (where for art thou, A-Man??? :D), you can also go to a 3 with no problems. Many think that the more acute a side edge angle becomes, the more grabby it is--this is not true. Side edge angles dictate edge grip, i.e. for firmer/icy snow conditions, so if you went to a 3 side it won't have any appreciable effect in softer conditions but when your wife gets on some firmer snow she will have better purchase when the skis are up on edge. It's the base edge bevel which dictates edge engagement, or how quickly the skis "hook up" when you roll from flat to on edge early in the turn. A lower base edge bevel (for instance 0.25, 0.5, or 0.7) can be hooky or grabby when running straight on flat surfaces without turning, like on a cat track because the base edge won't be as "raised" off of the snow surface--but she has a 1* which is standard so you're good there.

 

  Keep in mind though that the higher the degree you put on the side the more material you are taking off and that a 1 base and 2 side is by and large the industry standard for recreational skiing...

 

   zenny

Zen, you may speak your all knowing omnipotent wisdom for me anytime, cuz ya hit the nail on the head bro!  Everyone here knows I am a hug proponent of 3 degree side edges. And I figured on a Lady's rockered all mountain ski maybe going from a 1 to a 3 maybe a little extremem right of the bat for her. But, you can certainly go 3 and go back to 2, or go 2 and if she likes it increase to a 3 later!

post #8 of 13

  " If it ain't gotta 3, it ain't fer me!" :ski  (I just made that one up...might use it later :D)

 

  zenny

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post
 

 

   

  With my profound apologies to Atomicman for answering for him (where for art thou, A-Man??? :D), you can also go to a 3 with no problems. Many think that the more acute a side edge angle becomes, the more grabby it is--this is not true. Side edge angles dictate edge grip, i.e. for firmer/icy snow conditions, so if you went to a 3 side it won't have any appreciable effect in softer conditions but when your wife gets on some firmer snow she will have better purchase when the skis are up on edge. It's the base edge bevel which dictates edge engagement, or how quickly the skis "hook up" when you roll from flat to on edge early in the turn. A lower base edge bevel (for instance 0.25, 0.5, or 0.7) can be hooky or grabby when running straight on flat surfaces without turning, like on a cat track because the base edge won't be as "raised" off of the snow surface--but she has a 1* which is standard so you're good there.

 

  Keep in mind though that the higher the degree you put on the side the more material you are taking off and that a 1 base and 2 side is by and large the industry standard for recreational skiing...

 

   zenny

 Zenny!!! you were doing so well until you added that!   :D  Additional material removed is indiscernible!

 

To the OP.  Save yourself time and effort, go straight to a 3, all upside!

post #10 of 13
C'mon Scotskier...you know what a tuning geek I am biggrin.gif I guess I was filtering my answer through the eyes of a race tech--we all know how thin edges can be even on a new pair of stock skis...a pair that may have to last a few years of filing.

In my zeal to answer the question I promptly forgot how much steel there is on rec skis (a bit of a cop out one could say wink.gif ), but yes you are correct that minimal loss is incurred... thanks for keepin' me honest! smile.gif Although, if you want to go from more acute to less acute......

zenny
Edited by zentune - 9/16/13 at 6:25pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

C'mon Scotskier...you know what a tuning geek I am biggrin.gif I guess I was filtering my answer through the eyes of a race tech--we all know how thin edges can be even on a new pair of stock skis...a pair that may have to last a few years of filing.

In my zeal to answer the question I promptly forgot how much steel there is on rec skis (a bit of a cop out one could say wink.gif ), but yes you are correct that minimal loss is incurred... thanks for keepin' me honest! smile.gifAlthough, if you want to go from more acute to less acute......

zenny

 

:beercheer:  Not often I can get one on you Zenny!!

 

"Although, if you want to go from more acute to less acute......"   but why would that ever happen????  :D 

post #12 of 13

     Well...I suppose if one were heading to a hill where one knew the snow was hard, yet ultra dry and grippy one could increase the base edge and decrease the side to bring em to 89 or even 90......

but that just means you are spoiled........:D

 

    zenny

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

C'mon Scotskier...you know what a tuning geek I am biggrin.gif I guess I was filtering my answer through the eyes of a race tech--we all know how thin edges can be even on a new pair of stock skis...a pair that may have to last a few years of filing.

In my zeal to answer the question I promptly forgot how much steel there is on rec skis (a bit of a cop out one could say wink.gif ), but yes you are correct that minimal loss is incurred... thanks for keepin' me honest! smile.gifAlthough, if you want to go from more acute to less acute......

zenny

 

:beercheer:  Not often I can get one on you Zenny!!

 

"Although, if you want to go from more acute to less acute......"   but why would that ever happen????  :D 

 

'coz more acute tends to be more apsychotic?    


oh, wait, nvm, we're still on skis. 
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