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Real Skiers Reviews - Page 2

post #31 of 40

Peter Keelty has sold Realskiers to a gentleman named Jackson Hogan.  Mr. Hogan has years of experience in the industry, particularly with "Snow Country" and "Ski."  He has changed the format Peter used for ski reviews, possibly with the intention of attracting a more general, less "hard core" audience.  Whether that will eliminate the unique voice that Realskiers provided and make it more like "Ski" is up to its readers.  For the moment, it will be a free site.  If you have feedback or comments to provide to Mr. Hogan, go to the Realskiers site, the "About Us" tab, and use "Contact Us."

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike_m View Post
 

Peter Keelty has sold Realskiers to a gentleman named Jackson Hogan.  Mr. Hogan has years of experience in the industry, particularly with "Snow Country" and "Ski."  He has changed the format Peter used for ski reviews, possibly with the intention of attracting a more general, less "hard core" audience.  Whether that will eliminate the unique voice that Realskiers provided and make it more like "Ski" is up to its readers.  For the moment, it will be a free site.  If you have feedback or comments to provide to Mr. Hogan, go to the Realskiers site, the "About Us" tab, and use "Contact Us."

Shows what you know...Jackson Hogan is no gentleman. ;) Actually, Jackson is one of the smartest men in the ski industry..and a rum aficionado. I look forward to not only his reviews but his insights.  

post #33 of 40
post #34 of 40
Interesting. I'd been wondering what was up.
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Shows what you know...Jackson Hogan is no gentleman. wink.gif  Actually, Jackson is one of the smartest men in the ski industry..and a rum aficionado. I look forward to not only his reviews but his insights.  


With that article , I am already enjoying his reviews and insights.
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dauntless View Post
 
Quote:

With that article , I am already enjoying his reviews and insights.

 

Uh oh. :popcorn

post #37 of 40

I'm pretty unimpressed with many of the blog posts and with the video series. IMO there is still a fundamental misunderstanding of parts of how modern designs work. Not a total lack - but the way their brains are wrapped around firm snow shows. I've seen worse, but I won't be taking any advice from there at this point (especially given the apparent closeness to a particular proprietary instructional cult). That's my .02. YMMV

post #38 of 40

I have also enjoyed the new editors (Jackson Hogan) blog posts. Very insightful and IMHO address many issues that could use attention on the slopes today.

post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
 

I'm pretty unimpressed with many of the blog posts and with the video series. IMO there is still a fundamental misunderstanding of parts of how modern designs work. Not a total lack - but the way their brains are wrapped around firm snow shows. I've seen worse, but I won't be taking any advice from there at this point (especially given the apparent closeness to a particular proprietary instructional cult). That's my .02. YMMV

 

The fat skis blog could be written anytime in the past 10 years by any old timer. Yeah we get it - build your skills before building your quiver. Seems lazy and just generally insulting to many who might be reading it though rather than constructive.

post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 

 

The fat skis blog could be written anytime in the past 10 years by any old timer. Yeah we get it - build your skills before building your quiver. Seems lazy and just generally insulting to many who might be reading it though rather than constructive.

Or it could be written at any time in the last 40 years by just changing the piece of ski technology (shaped skis, plastic boots, P-Tex, Metal edges etc.)

 

As I have pointed out before, the argument rests entirely on a subjective judgment that people should want to maximize hard-snow performance.

 

If "Fat skis are a crutch for those that can't ski powder" is a valid statement, then so is "Skinny skis are a crutch for those that can't ski hardpack."  A proficient skier should have no problem making effective carved turns with a 100+ waist ski in icy conditions. Would it be easier on a skinnier ski? Of course, but how is that not a "crutch?"

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