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East coast skis

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Haven't bought skis in several years. I'm 5'11" 185lbs. I ski bumps, trees and groomers. Where I ski is usually hardpack, machine made snow and ice. What would be a good ski. I have been looking at rossi 88's, line 90's and kastle lx82.. Any recoomendations

post #2 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by idk1 View Post
 

Haven't bought skis in several years. I'm 5'11" 185lbs. I ski bumps, trees and groomers. Where I ski is usually hardpack, machine made snow and ice. What would be a good ski. I have been looking at rossi 88's, line 90's and kastle lx82.. Any recoomendations

Welcome to Epic. I would promptly add/move Blizzard's new Brahma to the head of your list. 

post #3 of 29

Love my 90s,but not on the ice.I go narrower on the hard stuff(.Dont own a pair i love yet)

post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 

I see you have Scott the ski in your quiver. I had them back in the 70's. I loved those skis

post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 

I used to ski on The ski, then I had a pair a Dynstar Verticals both of which I loved. The last six years I have been skiing on fishers rx 4. I lean towards being a finesse skier than agressive and prefer a ski with some flex as opposed to a skiff ski.

post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by idk1 View Post
 

I see you have Scott the ski in your quiver. I had them back in the 70's. I loved those skis

 

And The Ski could also be another fine option, a great playful option for what you are looking for. 

post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by idk1 View Post
I ski bumps, trees and groomers. Where I ski is usually hardpack, machine made snow and ice. 

What is wrong with these two sentences? 

 

Unless I've missed something off-season, trees tend not to be hardpack, or machine made, and if they're icy, I try to avoid them. Bumps, ditto. Groomers, yep, they can be hard/icy and made from machines. 

 

So which is it? Cuz if you're looking for a ski that will rock on firm groomers and firm bumps, you do not want an 88 mm ski. (And please, save personal testimonials to how my Belchfart 90xr slays ice, folks.) Shift to thinking about a low 70's to low 80's ski, ideally on the short side with maybe a touch of early rise. The Blizzard 8.0, Stockli AR, or Head Titan come to mind. 

 

If you're looking for a ski that will rock in the trees, then 88 is good but not great. At your weight, a high 90's to low 100's will be safer and happier. The Bonafide, E98, or Hell n' Back or Stockli 100 come to mind. 

 

Seriously, no ski does it all. Pick a priority, then amputate. 

post #8 of 29

Kastle mx78: really good edge grip, nice carving and nice in bumps and trees...

             fx84: less grip, nice carving and even better in bumps and trees

Élan 88xti: best carving of the 3 but more work in bumps...

post #9 of 29
I think I understand exactly what you're asking. I grew up in upstate New York. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you're asking for a ski that is capable of handling all conditions seen in that area on any particular day. I also like to ski everything on the mountain.

In the past, For me anyway, this meant a race oriented ski. My prominent concern was to deal with the ice making concessions to the ski's limitations in moguls as well as deeper snow.

If you are predominately an East Coast skier with emphasis on skiing upstate New York I would tell you to be careful about going too wide in the waist for the ski that you are considering.

I read many of the posts here and skiers seem to be concerned with powder and of piste skiing. I have been skiing in the Northeast my entire life and honestly there are not that many days where I'm skiing knee-deep powder. Let's face it, most the time even if there is powder there is an icy crust underneath after several runs you're dealing with the ice again.

I am constantly buying and then trading in skis once I realize their limitations. I would tell you the best ski I have ever been on in my life is the Kastle MX 83 for E. coast conditions.

It has enough waist width to give you float for typical East Coast conditions. It is narrow enough to retain the quickness needed for the narrow East Coast trails. I found it flexible enough in the shovel to ski moguls very well.

The best part of this ski is when it is really pressured it holds very similar to a typical race ski. I have never been on a ski that has more positive attributes for East Coast skiing.

I don't find this a difficult ski to use. I think any typical intermediate would be able to use it. I am not sure what level of skier you are? I would tell you that this ski really comes alive if you are a more advanced skier.

I know price can be an issue with a Kastle. If you really look around you can find some good deals.
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thnaks Mogsie and Dauntless. Dauntless you seem to know exactly what conditions I ski in. I seen a pair of Kaslte LX82's. Any info about those? As far as the level of skier that I am I would say I'm a better skier than the RX4's were made for but I'm no expert either...I don't think...What is an expert skier? Any other recommendations?

post #11 of 29

blizzard bonafide, volkl bridge, atomic theory are skis I'd look at.  my estimation is that the latter two skis are fairly playful, and all those skis should be good everywhere.

post #12 of 29
Also being a New York guy I have to mention the head Titan. I weigh 15 pounds more than you and love love love this ski. It does everything I want, bumps, groomers, trees and 6 inches or less of fresh stuff.
post #13 of 29

Where you ski and the home mountain where I ski sound pretty similar.  Somewhere in the following list (loosely arranged in order of preference) would be my personal choice as a do-it-all ski for the entire hill, most of the time.  I own the Kastle MX78 in 184cm; it's the best ski for our home conditions that I've ever tried.  In the last six weeks I've managed to demo the iRally, RTM84, Experience 83 and the Outland 80 Pro and my opinion of the MX78 hasn't changed one bit.

 

Kastle MX78 or MX83

Stockli Stormrider XXL (or 78 more recently)

Head Supershape iRally or iTitan

Blizzard Magnum 8.0ti, 8.1 or 8.5ti

Elan Amphibio 82XTi

Volkl RTM80, RTM81 or RTM84

Fischer Progressor 1000

Rossi Experience 83

Dynastar Outland 80 Pro

 

Best of luck.

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by idk1 View Post

Thnaks Mogsie and Dauntless. Dauntless you seem to know exactly what conditions I ski in. I seen a pair of Kaslte LX82's. Any info about those? As far as the level of skier that I am I would say I'm a better skier than the RX4's were made for but I'm no expert either...I don't think...What is an expert skier? Any other recommendations?

I think the LX 82 is less stout in its construction. If you skii mostly blues and an occasional black this might be the ski. If you ski mostly blacks I would get the MX 83.
post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 

I  ski mostly blacks  with bumps and only blues at the end of the day when i'm getting tired and don't want to stop yet.. When I'm not in bumps I ski glades if there is snow in the woods.I've read some reviews that kastle are on the stiff side. I prefer a ski with a little flex in them, not a lot though. I don't ski real fast so a little chatter won't bother me.

post #16 of 29
Lx82 may be the ticket then
post #17 of 29

I think i ski just like you. I have lived and skied in Vermont for many years and I love the woods up here mostly because the on-piste trails ice over within the first couple hours of the day.  I found a ski that is a bit older that i love, Rossi Zenith Z9Ti. With a fresh edge it will carve wicked hard and yet it floats extremely well for its size on the gladed trails and backwoods of Smuggs and Sugarbush. I highly recommend it or something of similar dimensions like other users have already said. 

http://www.skis.com/Rossignol-Zenith-Z9-Ti-Oversize-Skis-with-Axium-120---TPI-2-Bindings/110201P,default,pd.html

post #18 of 29

Outland 80 XT

Motive 80, 84 or 86

Progresser 800 ( little narrow waisted but surprisingly versatile ski)

head rev 80 or 85 pro

I ski primarily east coast and these are all good choices.

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil J View Post
 

head rev 80 or 85 pro

 

 

Oh yeah.  I overlooked those in my list.

post #20 of 29

Rev85 pro are just ok for me but I suspect that it's because of my 210 pounds... I think they are nicer for lighter guys... Also, they ski shorter than there lenght...the 177 feels like a 173. Must be the rocker...

post #21 of 29

I ski almost all my days in the same Eastern conditions as you, and I would strongly recommend getting something very skinny (under 80mm for sure, maybe way under) as the first ski in your East coast quiver. Ski industry marketing likes to sell the dream of massive pow days, but probably >98% of your turns will be on hard snow or conditions that would be called "un-skiable garbage" by the average Bridger Bowl ski bum. There are many, many excellent frontside-biased and frontrace skis made today, but the whole category is undermarketed so most people don't even consider buying them. And the guy in the shop will loudly claim that Ross Experience 88's "feel just like a race ski on ice because **handwave** rocker **magic**." This is a bold-faced lie, and if you spend a day or two demoing frontside skis, you are very likely to feel the night-and-day difference between skis designed for this coast and wider "all mountain" skis designed for conditions that very rarely exist here. 

 

Several people here have mentioned the skinny Fischer Progressors and the Elan Amphibios, and I'll second those recommendations in the skinny widths. Just be sure to demo any "Amphibio" before buying; the asymmetric early-rise takes some getting used to and you might not like it.

 

TL;DR: Get something under 80mm. The right Eastern ski for you is almost certainly not advertised in glossy magazines because it isn't "cool," so you have to dig and do research.

post #22 of 29

Fischer progressor 800 has no metal and still retains excellent edgehold on Ice. I used a 170cm for 3 seasons up at Cannon and Sugarloaf as my main stick and my only complaint was that I would have liked it better in a longer length. The next season after I bought them,they released a 175cm version. I weigh 196lbs and and am 6' and ski 45-50 days a year and the Fischer never let me down, Rips short and long turns equally well.Excellent in bumps and anything less than 8' of fresh snow. The are a little too carve oriented for regular tree skiing, but i used them in the trees for years without issue. Wider skis will perform better in the trees, but if that is not your primary skiing target then these will do nicely. The beauty of these skis is the turn initiation is superb. They fall into turns effortlessly and allow you to vary turn shape with ease.  You can get these in a variety of places right now with Binding for under $500.00.

You should check them out. Also the Motive series is affordable and quite verstaile as well, but not as snappy as a progressor. If I did not own a speed course as my hard snow ski, I would have picked up another progressor this summer for sure.800 or 900 series.never tried a 1000. I did not miss the metal in the 800 at all.

Good luck with your quest, but keep in mind, as many a wise man have told me and I have heeded their advice, buy a ski for the conditions you primarily ski in, not the conditions you hope to ski in.

Also the Head Titans have received many great reviews but they are expensive. Not sure the performance would be much different than from the progressors.

post #23 of 29

I have to disagree with many posters.  I ski the same places, and think you'd be happier with around a 95mm ski (I could be wrong).  You will be able to ski anything with it.  And yes it's not 1 day out of a 100, it's everyday at places like gore, a ski with a little rocker and width will make a difference.  If you are going to go into the woods, or want a ski that handles chopped up powder, different snow, you'll see a huge difference. If you don't care about going into the woods, skiing in mixed snow conditions, and new snow, then the rockers and width is not as good.

post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by like2ski123 View Post

I have to disagree with many posters.  I ski the same places, and think you'd be happier with around a 95mm ski (I could be wrong).  You will be able to ski anything with it.  And yes it's not 1 day out of a 100, it's everyday at places like gore, a ski with a little rocker and width will make a difference.  If you are going to go into the woods, or want a ski that handles chopped up powder, different snow, you'll see a huge difference. If you don't care about going into the woods, skiing in mixed snow conditions, and new snow, then the rockers and width is not as good.


 



95mm for a one ski, all around use in NY?


No thank you....
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by like2ski123 View Post
 

I have to disagree with many posters.  I ski the same places, and think you'd be happier with around a 95mm ski (I could be wrong).  You will be able to ski anything with it.  And yes it's not 1 day out of a 100, it's everyday at places like gore, a ski with a little rocker and width will make a difference.  If you are going to go into the woods, or want a ski that handles chopped up powder, different snow, you'll see a huge difference. If you don't care about going into the woods, skiing in mixed snow conditions, and new snow, then the rockers and width is not as good.

 



95mm for a one ski, all around use in NY?


No thank you....

 

Not sure about 95mm, but mine are 88mm under foot.   I live in Quebec, and ski mostly in QC, VT and NY.  88 mm works great for eastern conditions, and I have never found that these skis handicap me in any way whatsoever.

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacobillie View Post

 

Not sure about 95mm, but mine are 88mm under foot.   I live in Quebec, and ski mostly in QC, VT and NY.  88 mm works great for eastern conditions, and I have never found that these skis handicap me in any way whatsoever.

 




You can ski on any type of ski you choose, doesn't bother me in the slightest. I've played with lots of different skis on all types of New England snow and simply doen't find that produces the maximum amount of fun for me. On a very good snow cycle year it would be OK. Most years
(for me) not so much.


If they don't seem to handicap you on wind blown hardpack @ Tremblant ,then it makes me wonder when you last skied on a top end 70ish frontside specialty ski....
post #27 of 29

Reading through all the posts - bottom line is that its hard to have it all. 

 

I ski 3 different skis at Stowe: 

1. SL WC race ski for ice and skiing with my parents 

2. 80 underfoot hybrid GS ski for "good" east coast conditions

3. Powder ski for the times when they are needed (Used alot last year all things considered  - infact far more than my brother who skis Squaw on weekends) 

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacobillie View Post
 

 

Not sure about 95mm, but mine are 88mm under foot.   I live in Quebec, and ski mostly in QC, VT and NY.  88 mm works great for eastern conditions, and I have never found that these skis handicap me in any way whatsoever.

 




You can ski on any type of ski you choose, doesn't bother me in the slightest. I've played with lots of different skis on all types of New England snow and simply doen't find that produces the maximum amount of fun for me. On a very good snow cycle year it would be OK. Most years
(for me) not so much.


If they don't seem to handicap you on wind blown hardpack @ Tremblant ,then it makes me wonder when you last skied on a top end 70ish frontside specialty ski....

 

I agree with you except for my F.A. 84 edt... But it is the exception...

I usually ski with them or my sl skis in the morning and then switch for something else for bumps and trees ( from 76 to 88...and sometimes 98...)
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 

Paco, you didn't say waht you are skiing on that 88

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