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Dalbello Krypton Cross

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hi guys, i'm trying to decide between doing some work to my Dalbello Krypton Cross boots or buying something else. I'm a very high level skier, and yet somehow I know nothing about boots. About the only thing I like about these boots is the heel retention. I find the Kryptons pack out during the day and i'm having to tighten to the point of pressure points on the bottom 2 buckles. This also results in losing pretty much all flexibility in the boot. At the top end the tongue comes up too high and is way too stiff taking away from agility. I honestly don't even do up the top buckle unless i'm doing something really reckless. It should be noted that I have always preferred a flexible fit around the shins and ankles, and a tight fit around my foot. Are these too many issues to bother with, or is there a different liner or mods to do that could get this boot to where I need it to be? My feet are very skinny, 3 1/2 inches at the widest point.

 

I'm wondering what can be done to fix these issues, or if there's a better boot I could be in. I am a freeride skier and I do require a lot from my boot as i'm quite aggressive, but I also go nut around with friends that are just learning so I need something that can do it all. Other than fit, my main concerns are flexibility in the shin, comfort, and the lighter the better.

 

Thanks to any who take the time to help me out.

post #2 of 15

first thing is probably to do a shell check, see the wiki at the top of the forum for instructions

 

my money is on the boot is too big, if not in length certainly in volume.

 

it will depend on what size your feet are as to if 3 1/2 " is just narrow or very narrow, it may be a case of looking at a new boot something like a softer flexing race boot in a  92-95mm last , but that said i cannot see your feet from here 

 

depending on the results of the shell check you can then go 2 ways, work with a fitter to make these better, or, deposit them in the nearest skip/ebay and start from scratch, find a good boot fitter in your area rather than just a boot seller.... all boots can be used all over the mountain, the marketing is really the difference (and sure some park boots have soft toes)

post #3 of 15

I'm with CEM.  The Krypton is a low volume boot I'd say but if purchased to big all that is left is over-tightening and the problems it causes can only be reliably fixed by replacement.

 

Lou

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the responses guys, it definitely seems like this boot is too big. Unfortunately it's about a 4 hour drive to get anywhere that would have a boot fitter, so I kind of had to just go with my local ski shop. It seems like the guy set me up for a more recreational fit, i've got 2 fingers of space behind my heel and 1 finger of space in my instep, this may be unavoidable as I have a pretty crazy arch. I was unable to find anything about low volume, but I would certainly think I am low volume. My feet are 10 inches long, 3 1/2 inches at their widest, and 2 1/2 inches at their highest. 

 

If I have come to the right conclusion, perhaps you guys could recommend which brands make a quality skinny/low volume freeride boot. I do quite a lot of back country, hell, cat skiing of the more extreme variety and really want something that performs there, is extremely light for hiking and tricks, and can handle huge drops...while being comfortable. I should say that my Krypton crosses handled everything very well, I just was constantly tightening and they come up too high on the shin. If I could get a better fit, and there's maybe a different boot that comes up lower on the shin I would consider dalbello again. I do love the heel retention and they are fairly light.

 

Thanks again guys.

post #5 of 15

So you like the Cross and it is a a fairly low volume shell.  Why not try the next size smaller.  What size does your foot measure in Mondo point?

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

I've actually had my boots on today just to refresh my memory and I don't have room to go down a size. The length is actually perfect, it's the whole volume thing that seems to be the issue. These boots are 255, and 98 width. I'm thinking I need to find 97 width, which means K2 which is impossible to get. I talked to the guy that sold me all my ski gear today and he mentioned intuition liners, anyone think they will solve anything?

post #7 of 15

if you have all these issues an intuition liner is not likely to solve them (well maybe it will for a week or 2)  with the amount of skiing and at the level you are skiing at the only solution to get this right is to work with a boot fitter....  4 hours is not that far to increase your enjoyment, the vast majority of my clients drive well over 1 hour to get tom me and we frequently get people fly in from other countries for boot work, each and every fitter on this forum has exactly the same type of story to tell.  if you want this right you will have to travel

 

with 2 fingers behind your heel unless you have the world skinniest fingers dropping a size should be very possible 2 of my fingers = about 35mm so dropping one size (10mm) and the boot is still too big... now the problem here is getting a mens boot in a  24.5 there are a few out there but you need a boot fitter rather than a boot seller because unless you fit boots you will never sell a 24.5 to a male all season long 

 

on the 98mm v 97mm debate, IMO the lange 97mm shell fits wider than many of the 98mm shells out there, it is all about the shell shape verses your foot shape and 1mm in width is not going to improve things if the shell has 3mm more height in it or similar

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post
 

if you have all these issues an intuition liner is not likely to solve them (well maybe it will for a week or 2)  with the amount of skiing and at the level you are skiing at the only solution to get this right is to work with a boot fitter....  4 hours is not that far to increase your enjoyment, the vast majority of my clients drive well over 1 hour to get tom me and we frequently get people fly in from other countries for boot work, each and every fitter on this forum has exactly the same type of story to tell.  if you want this right you will have to travel

 

with 2 fingers behind your heel unless you have the world skinniest fingers dropping a size should be very possible 2 of my fingers = about 35mm so dropping one size (10mm) and the boot is still too big... now the problem here is getting a mens boot in a  24.5 there are a few out there but you need a boot fitter rather than a boot seller because unless you fit boots you will never sell a 24.5 to a male all season long 

 

on the 98mm v 97mm debate, IMO the lange 97mm shell fits wider than many of the 98mm shells out there, it is all about the shell shape verses your foot shape and 1mm in width is not going to improve things if the shell has 3mm more height in it or similar

I understand going to a boot fitter is the best option, what I don't understand is what exactly they are going to do. Are they going to fix my boots? If I have to buy from them what am I going to be buying? Quality brands or custom jobs? Maybe my liner has a super thick heel or something, I have no idea but unless there's a different liner option there's no way i'm dropping a size my toes are exactly where they are supposed to be. I would never buy Lange so that's not a problem. The only boots I see as options right now are the K2 spyne and pinnacle which are 97 and apparently very low volume. Getting K2 where I live however is a whole new box of worms.

post #9 of 15

97's are 98's and vice versa. it's a number that is chosen by the supplier to help them find a place in the market for their boots. 

 

your best reason for seeking out a boot fitter is so that your foot, ankle, and lower leg become the tool that you use to measure how a boot fits. the boot fitter is where those boot try-on options are. most of the descriptions that you are using online cannot be matched to your foot because the writer of those descriptions is using their foot to tell you how they fit, and there is no way over the interwebz that you can know exactly how their foot is shaped. 

 

you are not required to use the good advice that has been freely given to you by boot fitting experts. it's your time and money.

 

good luck in your search,

 

jim

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 

Appreciate the advice, I ask a lot of questions because I don't understand. It seems like i'm annoying people so i'll figure it out.

post #11 of 15

couple of things

 

1  "you would never buy lange"  any reason?, don't like the colour , the pair you tried 5 years ago didn't work etc etc, what if it was the one! (not saying it is but it might be, never say never , all you do is limit your options)

 

2 like Jim says a boot fitter will have the options to try on and be able to guide you and work with you to attain the space for your toes that you crave yet anchor your heel a the back of the boot... how were your intuitions moulded?, did the fitter use toe caps on your feet, were they hard or soft? if not used or if they were very soft toe caps then the liner will creep back towards the foot, your toes feel in the right place but is there a 10mm gap in front of the liner inside the shell, if fitted correctly any gap will be inside the liner (for your toes) and the space between the liner and the shell will be pretty much non existent... or is it that your toes feel like in the right place because your foot is not a the back of the liner/shell, maybe your ankle joint is tight in terms of range of motion, if that is preventing you getting to the back of the boot then you will be jammed at the front, you have already said how much space there is in the shell, you just need to locate your foot in the correct position within it..... it is things like this that a boot fitter can help with

 

you are not annoying people (yet) but there is a load of info that you have given which we would all suggest points you towards a smaller boot, yet you have it fixed in your mind that it is not possible

 

it may just be something as simple as volume, try cutting a coupe of piece so cardboard (cornflake packet will do) the shape of the base of the liner, put them into the shell below the liner and see if all your problems go away, pretty temporary but it may be an indicator

post #12 of 15

+1

 

you seem to have formed some very restrictive opinions about what you will or will not do to solve your problems with your ski boots. keep in mind we are only out here to help skiers like you have a better experience on the mountain. we have the luxury of not having to get to know you, so therefore with no emotional attachment it is a little difficult for you to really piss us off. i am not suggesting that you need to adjust your approach. i am of the opinion that you have given us enough information to know that there are some fixes for your boot situation. they are your boots, your feet and your skiing.

 

asking what you will get from having a good boot fitter ( not some guy that works part-time in a ski selling store) and then not being open to go see, gives me the impression that you are not being sincere. as in you are only asking the questions so you can tell us that those tried and true responses could not possibly work for you because the planet that you live on has different gravity!

 

perhaps this would be a good time to ask on this forum questions like, where could i find the best boot fitter close to where i am located that could help me to figure out whether i am in the correct boot for my feet and if this boot could be fixed? or should we do a proper assessment of my feet and skiing goals so that you could help me select the best match for me from your inventory?

 

good luck getting this sorted out. 

 

jim

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

I had my reservations for sure, sorry but I was not as convinced as everyone else was that my boots were too long based on a confusing wiki test. I've been skiing at a high level for 21 years, and my ski guy has been selling, working on and doing custom foot beds for ski boots for 40 years. Hardly a part time hack. If my ski boots were not too long, which I know they aren't then it really wasn't worth it for me to take 2 days off work. Unless anyone could tell me different, which nobody could, nobody makes a smaller volume freeride boot besides K2, which I have since ruled out due to being monstrously heavy. Maybe Full Tilt is lower volume, but i've heard terrible things about them from people I trust.

 

It is absolutely fair to say i'm not open to some options. I spent the majority of my ski years in race boots or Lange's, and would rather fiddle with my kryptons again all year than go back to either of those. Am I picky? Absolutely, Insincere? Not a chance.

 

I have since found a boot fitter much closer, and I was pretty much bang on with everything. The options I was given are race boots or custom foaming my kryptons, which I have no interest in. Or doing intuitions, a different custom foot bed and some other work on my Kryptons, which is probably the way i'll go. 

 

I've always kind of been straight to the point, so apologies if my forum etiquette isn't up to snuff. I really do mean it when I say I appreciate the help and i've learned a lot. 

post #14 of 15

have i missed something here or has a fitter just told you that your current boot with (according to you 2 fingers behind the heel) (my measurement works at around 30-35mm) is the correct size

 

 

yup i must have missed something

 

a fitter can work for 40 years doing a job, but it doesn't mean that he is doing it the best way, maybe well enough to make a living (assuming no competition form better around him)  the shop 500mts from me used to have a sign saying professional boot fitting hung above the door, 30 years + he was in business, he closed down 4 years ago and we are still seeing the clients from his store with boots 2 and 3 sizes too big on a regular basis

post #15 of 15

Glad you appreciate the help it is all we are really trying to do.  Obviously you have been around skiing for a long time and your opinions are valid based on your experience.  Unfortunately there are thousands of guys and gals that have been around as long as you have, work in a ski shop but without the added benefit of biomechanics training, or pedorthics or podiatry or in some way going outside the industry to actually learn anatomy and foot movement they really are no more knowledgeable than anyone on the street.  This is industry like many others I'm sure does a great job of making untrained experts.

 

Jim is right 97 or 98 are really the same boot and volume is not only about width anyway, even if the 1 mm was important.  You say you've had your boots on and the length is perfect but don't explain to us how you know that.  By feel?  I have customers in the store every year in boots four sizes to large.  I'm 6'2" and wear a size 27 boot and have 5'3" women in every year wearing the identical size.  Certainly they didn't feel to large in the store.  

 

Race Langes are a close fitting boots especially in the heel area and long ago they had a substantial share of the race market.  Many of our feet were damaged using them, but it wasn't really the boot it was the lack of knowledge about how to customize the boot so they work well with different foot shapes and skiing styles.  I have the heel spurs to prove it.  But I am skiing Rossi/Lange comfortably now using the same modification I use on every boot I own.

 

So all we are saying is that your past experiences may be getting in your way and interestingly enough although everyone answering you is in different places with different training we all agree that 2 cm is often too much and that a shell fit, not simply trying a boot on is the only way to determine proper length and volume.

 

Lou

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