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What is it about "new" skis?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I've got at least three pairs of skis that were purchased within the past three years, several more within the past 6 years.  None of these skis has more than 20 days on them.  Most have less than ten (full) days on them.  Yet, I still yearn for and lust after something "new".  I've got just about every angle and conditions/purpose scenario well covered in my current quiver.  The only thing lacking is something brand spanking new... Although, I've only put about two days on the most recently acquired pair of boards.

 

 

Also, I don't really dislike any of the stuff I'm keeping in rotation.

 

 

Are we addicted to "new" gear?

post #2 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Are we addicted to "new" gear?

 

 

 

Yes.  Any other burning questions?  

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks!

 

Moderators you can close this thread now ;-)

post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 Yet, I still yearn for and lust after something "new".

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Do Work View Post


  Any other burning questions?  

 

This thread is about skis, yes?    

post #5 of 23

Your issue isn't the acquisition of new skis, it's the inability to let go of the less than perfect ones!  Just because you don't dislike the old skis doesn't mean you should abandon the hunt. Life's a journey - keep looking! 

post #6 of 23

I have found that when I buy a ski I love, I am loyal to it and 

don't have the desire to get a new one. Conversely,

when I buy a ski I I just "kinda" like I have wanderlust for a new ski.

 

Don't be stupid like me and buy skis that have great reviews,

but didn't demo. A ski may be ski of the year, but it might not be for you.

 

Last year I bought the Volkl Werks rtm 84 for half price from a rep.

 Because it was a last minute deal I did not have a chance to demo it,

Stupid me again. Luckily, it was a great blind date.  I am in love again.

 

Now I am buying new boots after 5 years. 

 

Switching brands didn't really work for me. I like Volkl skis for good and for bad.

 

Focus on some brands you really like, and demo them.

 

Steve

post #7 of 23

By way of analogy: I know a number of people who have something like 10-25 50mm camera lenses. They probably use two or three for work. But they keep the rest because each one had different optical qualities.

 

What's exciting about skis is that they each have difference characters. Different materials, shapes, qualities. You could have 3 180cm long, 100mm wide skis that all do things slightly differently-- and are all fun depending on mood, conditions, plan for the day. Ain't nothing wrong with that.

post #8 of 23
I have maybe 6 days on my Head Rev 105's that I bought last spring, and just acquired a pair of Rev 85's (courtesy of Phil and Starthaus' consignment sale, thanks!).

You see, getting a wider pair of skis shifted the delicate balance of the quiver and another pair was necessary to restore the balance.
post #9 of 23
Can't pass up a bargain? Stay calm,you can get help even if you don't want it. Get some spray paint. Everytime you need new skis get out a can,...
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

Are we addicted to "new" gear?

 

Actually, I'm kind of the opposite.  When I think about getting new skis I get this overwhelming feeling of dread. I am not a gear head and I don't follow all of the new skis so it means that I have to study up and then try out a bunch of skis, or just buy some on a whim or because they are cheap, not knowing if they'll be good for me or not.  This is not fun for me, just a lot of work and worry.  The last couple of times the difference in ski performance from my last skis was so small (luckily they were a little better) that I wondered why I did it. 

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 The last couple of times the difference in ski performance from my last skis was so small (luckily they were a little better) that I wondered why I did it. 

 

I used to feel this way about dates.

post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

 The last couple of times the difference in ski performance from my last skis was so small (luckily they were a little better) that I wondered why I did it. 

I used to feel this way about dates.

Try figs next time.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I've got at least three pairs of skis that were purchased within the past three years, several more within the past 6 years.  None of these skis has more than 20 days on them.  Most have less than ten (full) days on them.  Yet, I still yearn for and lust after something "new".  I've got just about every angle and conditions/purpose scenario well covered in my current quiver.  The only thing lacking is something brand spanking new... Although, I've only put about two days on the most recently acquired pair of boards.

 

 

Also, I don't really dislike any of the stuff I'm keeping in rotation.

 

 

Are we addicted to "new" gear?


  Personally Dart, I find it much more satisfying to buy used skis that still have life left in them.  I have bought two "new" pair in the last few years, one for my wife, one for me.  Both are nice, but no better than any used pair I have bought at a fraction of the price.  I get them cheep.  I can see there is still life in them.  The tunes are always way screwed up.  I spend hours to fix the tunes.  Then they always ski killer.  I feel sorry for the suckers who did not like them anymore.  A bad tune can make a good skier suck.  On the other hand, I fully tuned the "new" ones before they ever hit the snow.  In conclusion, just because it is new does not mean it's better.  Most of my skis are 7 to 10 plus years old and with bindings cost not more than $70.00 per pair.

post #14 of 23
^^^
I was with you until the very last sentence. Imo, a 2 or 3 year old ski is often a great value. An 8 or 10 year old ski, not so much. Rossi Bandit, anyone?
post #15 of 23

Crgildart

 

We share the same  addiction . Mine extends to ski clothing as well .

post #16 of 23
I like the new ski smell. I just buy a new pair every summer problem solved.
post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post


  Personally Dart, I find it much more satisfying to buy used skis that still have life left in them.  I have bought two "new" pair in the last few years, one for my wife, one for me.

I usually get new old stock, 2-3 year old models or gently used from similar timeframe.  For me "new" is something I didn't already have.  I'd only get something beyond 5 years past if it was something I've really wanted for a long time like an older Gotama in good shape/low miles. 

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

^^^
I was with you until the very last sentence. Imo, a 2 or 3 year old ski is often a great value. An 8 or 10 year old ski, not so much. Rossi Bandit, anyone?

 

As you can see in his tuning video, Jacques was clever enough to give the Bandit a miss and go with a 9S

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


Try figs next time.

I must admit to not getting it the first time I read it.   Good one!  

post #20 of 23
I know crgildart. Believe he builds his quiver very inexpensively while buying interesting used skis or new old stock, maybe at 10% of original retail. So his addiction is not quite as indulgent as it appears and is a fun way to stoke his passion. I'm from the old school where a recreational skier bought a ski and kept it as their one ski quiver for a decade, and even then it stuck around for another five years as the rock skis. I have fond memories of a pair of Dynastar's that I skied from 1978 to 1993. I might have put about 500+ days on them during that time. More recently I enjoyed for several years skiing a pair of Fischer RX8's that I bought slightly used at a cost of a dollar a centimeter:-) Now we have a ski for every type of snow condition, terrain, and technique so it's much more tempting to build a multifaceted quiver. I still don't have too many active skis, but as an old hacker I'm always hoping a new pair gives me an edge to compensate for my weaknesses.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

 maybe at 10% of original retail

Would you teach us how to do that? biggrin.gif I'm really happy paying 50% or 40% of retail... now 10% that's a whole new ball game! eek.gif

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

^^^
I was with you until the very last sentence. Imo, a 2 or 3 year old ski is often a great value. An 8 or 10 year old ski, not so much. Rossi Bandit, anyone?

 

As you can see in his tuning video, Jacques was clever enough to give the Bandit a miss and go with a 9S

Oh you saw that.  Answer is I do have a pair of old Bandit XX women's in a 160 length.  I love those skis!  I can kill a carve on those puppies!  Also have a pair of Rossi Pros in a 195 I believe.  They are 21 meter turn! 

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

 maybe at 10% of original retail

Would you teach us how to do that? biggrin.gif I'm really happy paying 50% or 40% of retail... now 10% that's a whole new ball game! eek.gif


Second hand baby!  Thrift stores.  Etc.

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