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Dynafit bindings and the beginner?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I am a big fan of Dynafit bindings but at least think I understand their limitations for me as a long time skier.  But I have no clue how a 1st year beginner would fair with them.

 

Problem is, I think the lwt AT boots are easier to walk and ski in.  Enough so, that they  might be better than most alpine boots in many ways.

 

Is the "marginal" safety and on and off hassles of clipping in the AT bindings for a real beginner worth the extra effort of starting on AT boots and bindings?  Much of her time will be in ski school classes.  Or would you suggest a down hill boot and bindings?

 

The goal here is to get my wife back on skis, safely and in the best gear possible for her to learn quickly and have the most amount of fun while doing so.

 

Anyone here started as a beginner at a ski area on AT gear? 

post #2 of 15

For resort skiing, a regular alpine binding is much more predictable and reliable... don't see any advantage to use a dynafit setup whic are much more expensive and don't offer any advantage if you are not touring.

 

What are you trying to gain from using an AT setup for inbound skiing only?

 

Also being a first year skier, much harder to find demo and rental gear that's dynafit and tech compatible.

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

One of her major complaints from skiing several decades ago is how clunky the boots were.  Dynafit TLTs solve that problem easily.  More like lwt hikers than ski boots.

 

I don't see any disadvantage in the boots and ski in them myself.  Other than only accepting tech bindngs.

 

Expense isn't a real concern, neither is demo gear.  Fun on the other hand is.

 

Problem is tech bindings can be a pia if you are coming out of them all the time I suspect.

 

The dreaded slow twisting fall doesn't seem to be as well addressed either on any tech binding.

 

"a regular alpine binding is much more predictable and reliable..."

 

The real question here is...."Is it?"

post #4 of 15

She could try the DYnafit Titan and/or the Scarpa Freedom. Maybe she will like the lighter boots, the walking mode and still be able to use on a regular alpine binding.

post #5 of 15

There are AT bindings out there that are as secure as any alpine only binding.  I personnally ski lon Naxo NX 21s, but they are no longer available.  Look into Marker Barons or Tour 10.  They will fit her AT boots.

post #6 of 15

Look at Dynafit ZZero boots...very light, great ski/walk mode, and they come with interchangeable (DIN or Tech) sole lugs.  My wife loves them

post #7 of 15
IMHO Dane, you're getting some poor and expensive advice. Your wife looked at boots decades ago. Many alpine boots that will be suitable for her are much lighter than back in the day. Several now have walk modes if you want to go that route and come in range of flexes. Want to spend money? Put in an intuition liner for her... Buy some additional comfort, warmth, and fit while dumping weight. Many of the appropriate bindings are also pretty light and easy to get in and out of. Buy her a tech set up when she's ready to do some touring. Also realize that a binding like the Marker F-10, while able to accommodate an AT sole, cannot be properly release tested.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

IMHO Dane, you're getting some poor and expensive advice. Your wife looked at boots decades ago. Many alpine boots that will be suitable for her are much lighter than back in the day. Several now have walk modes if you want to go that route and come in range of flexes. Want to spend money? Put in an intuition liner for her... Buy some additional comfort, warmth, and fit while dumping weight. Many of the appropriate bindings are also pretty light and easy to get in and out of. Buy her a tech set up when she's ready to do some touring. Also realize that a binding like the Marker F-10, while able to accommodate an AT sole, cannot be properly release tested.


.... in an AT soled boot. Too much friction in the system at release.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

"Dane, you're getting some poor and expensive advice. Your wife looked at boots decades ago. Many alpine boots that will be suitable for her are much lighter than back in the day."

 

Ha, Ha!  I have lighter DH high performance boots from 30 years ago than what is common today.

Even the best of the apine boots aren't going to be much difference that what was available in the past.

 

Intitions liners are common in some of the factory offerings.  Palau or Intitions were a given.

 

I hated to do it (buy down hill boots).  We bought the ladies Scarpa Freedom.  Still 3# 14oz per boot in a 25...basically 4# per boot or 8# for the pairr.  Which is silly.  And still lighter than most DH boots.

 

TLT is 4 1/2 for the pair.  One is 5 1/2 for the pair.

 

My favorite full release AT bindings are well under a pound for the pair.

 

The "poor advice"?  It comes from my own experience beercheer.gif


Edited by Dane - 8/28/13 at 11:23am
post #10 of 15
Then it sounds like you're posting looking for affirmation rather than other thoughts. No problem. She'll be fine on whatever you put her on. I don't think anyone is attempting to tell you that alpine gear is lighter than an AT setup.


(Your, and probably many others' favorite AT bindings, are also much more expensive than pretty much any alpine binding on the market. )
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

No, wasn't looking for affirmation.  Just real world experience.   I am not a big fan of a beginner on AT gear for several reasons.  Weight and cost isn't one of them.  Getting in and out of them is a issue.  Just not sure how much of an issue.  Seems simple enough now.  It is not "just clicking in".  Close enough for me these days.

 

"Many alpine boots that will be suitable for her are much lighter than back in the day."  Just didn't find your observation accurate.

 

The level of safety with the best tech bindings is an issue I think for beginners in a slow twisting fall.  A lot of compromises there from my perspective.  That said I have spent the last 3 yeras on nothing but tech bindings on all my skis for in and out of bounds.  This winter I am going back to a DH binding reluctantly on some skis.  But price isn't the motivation there.   In this case I want less ramp angle on the ski/binding/boot combo.  Not a beginner's concern typically.

 

Ha, you should have heard my wife's retort after reading the TGR thread on the same topic.  At that point she decided on full on AT gear just to prove her point.  What that point is I am not sure, even now eek.gif   Took some talking to get her to lower those expectations duel.gif

 

I ski half dozen set of boots a winter and two or three times that number of skis.  For me...even with a small trade off in control the lwt gear is much more fun to spend the day in.   I can remember when a run down the bunny hill resulted in any number of falls.  Short of breaking anything I can only imagine how much more fun it would be to have gear that weighted 2/3 less than the typical dh gear available.

 

All of which gets me rethinking the whole thing and looking at AT bindings and boots again.

post #12 of 15
Other than release, there's no particular reason why she can't do the AT gear thing to learn in. If the boot fits, wear it and be happy.

(Grab a woman's lange RX or RT, put in an intuition liner. They aren't AT boots, but they're lighter than a Head B5... Noticeably so, but it doesn't really matter.)
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

End result of all this...Redheads never listen to reason :)

http://coldthistle.blogspot.com/2013/09/the-ski-project-part-1.html

 

The rest of the story still has to be written!

post #14 of 15

Since I know your location, I can tell you that Snoqualmie has a consecutive week evening randonee beginners class (think it's primarily beginners, I've only taught as a sub for the lower level class) (http://www.summitatsnoqualmie.com/Lessons-and-Rentals/Multi-Week) that covers the skiing portion of randonee. The beginning class starts with a never-ever baseline similar to a never-ever alpine class.

 

It's definitely a different feel, but we have a couple of instructors that teach in tech gear exclusively. The skiing is going to be more or less the same on either tech or alpine.

 

Personally, I'd steer towards alpine gear unless you're planning on using the tech setup for skinning. There are much better boot choices these days, if comfort and clunkiness are priorities, look into 3-piece boots (Full Tilt, Dalbello, etc.). They're still ski boots so they'll still be stiff (a good thing, which she'll realize when she gets going), but they're much more pleasant than teh ghastly gear of the past.

post #15 of 15

I bought my wife a total Dynafit outfit for her 69th birthday one year ago: Vertical STs, Women's Manaslu, Manaslu skins, Women's TLT5s, 7-summits poles.  She had been skiing telemark for 25 years, began skiing alpine downhill her first year and then for the last year before the Dynafits.  With a brief demonstration on my part with explanations of things that cause problems, she adapted to Dynafits in the backcountry in less than one day: from free heel to fixed heel, skinning, climbing, and skiing down in a whole variety of snow conditions and slopes to 40 degrees.  She hasn't used her tele outfit since.  Because I know you know the area, she found it easy to skin from 4th Crossing up Stevens Creek, then up the Paradise Glacier and back down again.

 

She still uses her downhill gear lift-served (Volkl Attivas with system bindings and Moment Pikas with Marker Squires), but will be switching to the Dynafit setup when we decide to go deep sidecountry or lift-served backcountry.

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