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RV ,s to the slopes - Page 3

post #61 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

 

I don't think cops will write a ticket for parking on private property especially since my argument would be that unless they have a sign saying "No overnight parking", then  permission to park is implied.

 

In any event I have found it is usually better to apologize after the fact than asking permission in advance because often times you go undetected so no apology needed.

While I do agree it's often better to ask forgiveness as anachronism pointed out your reasoning is not true and in my experience resort towns often aggressively discourage it otherwise they would have all kinds of ski bums and what not sleeping in cars all over town. The normal type of tourist would be intimidated or put off by such an image. The town makes a lot more money of off people that are willing to pay for hotels than the guy who would rather sleep in the front seat of his subaru than pay for hotel so they care more about the former's opinion. They could care less if the car camper never comes back after paying his fine.  

post #62 of 72

The key is knowing towns where they are not agro about it. In mammoth I blended into a condo complex lot that was not really full and no one cared,in places like truckee  strip mall lots off the road side works. During blizzard people have other things to wory about, except the plow drivers and that is problematic. I could see how places like aspen and jackson might be tricky while salt lake would be ez because more of a metropolitan center. My camper is 22 feet, a 40 foot rv would stick out a bit.

post #63 of 72

I figured I would bump this thread to show off the new rig.

 

I popped a head gasket in my 2010 Forester XT, which is exactly the very first time the dealer down here has seen one of the turbo models need a headgasket- notorious on the normally aspirated models, supposed to be a non-issue on the turbos, except mine. The only thing I can think of is that it is related to all of the towing of my camp trailer, which just squeaks under the towing capacity of the Subaru- but was it intended to tow that capacity all over Colorado and the west? 

 

So, that, coupled with our growing need to have a little more in the way of space, lead me to buy this.

 

 

Its a 1989 Lazy Daze 22'- with an aircraft aluminum exterior and a Chevy cab with a 350 TBI/TH400. I paid under $5k and it runs great- I bought it and drove it the 300 miles home from the front range 2 days later. It needed me to throw a new water heater in it, replace a few roof vents on their last legs, and to finish the previous owners' job at changing fridges by finishing the open space above the new smaller fridge. 

 

The picture above was taken on our inaugural outing with it to shakedown any problems- not a one. It has both an air conditioner and a swamp cooler that will run on 12V. Freshwater plumbing is all within heated space, but I don't know if I want to trust it in winter.

 

I got 11 MPG running it back home, which I consider a win considering the climbs up La Veta and Wolf Creek passes. Double digit fuel economy driving in mountains is always worth a cheer. I am hoping the fact that it is relatively compact makes it a non deathtrap in snow, although we primarily ski camp in Spring when the roads are *usually* clear save for the final ascent to the ski area.

post #64 of 72

Here is my portable shower:

 

 

I don't run my water system in winter, I just heat up 2 gallons of water on the stove.

post #65 of 72
I would need to heat up twelve gallons.... Actually, I don't think that would be enough to get the soap out of my hair, either.
post #66 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I would need to heat up twelve gallons.... Actually, I don't think that would be enough to get the soap out of my hair, either.

 

RV water heaters tend to heat much hotter than the home- I think ours came preset to about 140*. When you mix it with cool water to get back down to a sane temp, that typical 6 gallon tank can stretch quite a ways.

post #67 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

I figured I would bump this thread to show off the new rig.

I popped a head gasket in my 2010 Forester XT, which is exactly the very first time the dealer down here has seen one of the turbo models need a headgasket- notorious on the normally aspirated models, supposed to be a non-issue on the turbos, except mine. The only thing I can think of is that it is related to all of the towing of my camp trailer, which just squeaks under the towing capacity of the Subaru- but was it intended to tow that capacity all over Colorado and the west? 

So, that, coupled with our growing need to have a little more in the way of space, lead me to buy this.




Its a 1989 Lazy Daze 22'- with an aircraft aluminum exterior and a Chevy cab with a 350 TBI/TH400. I paid under $5k and it runs great- I bought it and drove it the 300 miles home from the front range 2 days later. It needed me to throw a new water heater in it, replace a few roof vents on their last legs, and to finish the previous owners' job at changing fridges by finishing the open space above the new smaller fridge. 

The picture above was taken on our inaugural outing with it to shakedown any problems- not a one. It has both an air conditioner and a swamp cooler that will run on 12V. Freshwater plumbing is all within heated space, but I don't know if I want to trust it in winter.

I got 11 MPG running it back home, which I consider a win considering the climbs up La Veta and Wolf Creek passes. Double digit fuel economy driving in mountains is always worth a cheer. I am hoping the fact that it is relatively compact makes it a non deathtrap in snow, although we primarily ski camp in Spring when the roads are *usually* clear save for the final ascent to the ski area.

Looks like a cool rig. How many does it sleep?
post #68 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

RV water heaters tend to heat much hotter than the home- I think ours came preset to about 140*. When you mix it with cool water to get back down to a sane temp, that typical 6 gallon tank can stretch quite a ways.

True.  My old 1982 RV had a thermostat on the water heater.  My 2007 class C doesn't have an adjustable thermostat, and it took me awhile to figure out that fact.  Not what I consider progress, but it does stretch out the hot water supply.

 

11 mpg is pretty sweet, even for a shorty 22 footer.

post #69 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post
 

True.  My old 1982 RV had a thermostat on the water heater.  My 2007 class C doesn't have an adjustable thermostat, and it took me awhile to figure out that fact.  Not what I consider progress, but it does stretch out the hot water supply.

 

11 mpg is pretty sweet, even for a shorty 22 footer.

 

I know, right? That was at 65 mph most of the way, too. I slowed down to about 40-45 up the passes- trying to just go as fast as I could in 3rd without downshifting and winding the motor out, but the gas milage was a REALLY pleasant surprise.

 

I got about 14-15 mpg hauling my camp trailer around the mountains with my Subaru- which needs mandatory premium (thanks, turbo). I would tow it at 60-65 and slow down to maybe 50 on the passes. 11 MPG of regular gas vs 14-15 of premium is almost a wash.

 

Part of what I was looking for in my RV search was a small block motor with fuel injection. I'd rather go a little slower and get a few more MPG than deal with the kind of MPG a 7.5L engine gives you- and it isn't like the big blocks make an RV perform well, so...

 

My parents had a motorhome with a FI 460 Ford. They overheated the exhaust manifolds 4 different times, breaking off exhaust manifold bolts in the head. Twice this also resulted in fried exhaust valves from the ensuing exhaust leak. Each time the offending head(s) needed to be removed and have the bolts drilled out and valves replaced. $1000+ each go around. 

 

The mechanic said this was common in with the 460 equipped cabs, as there was not enough airflow to cool the manifolds in the tight space of the Van cab- and the extra load of the motorhome would lead to cooked manifolds.  My parents, my father particularly, loved to charge up to Eisenhower with the pedal matted most of the way, getting something like 2 mpg and in many cases blowing up the manifolds/heads. I also drove that RV all over Colorado and never had a problem simply by accepting that I would take whatever speed I could get climbing passes with keeping the rpm low.

post #70 of 72

Quote:

 

Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

 

The mechanic said this was common in with the 460 equipped cabs, as there was not enough airflow to cool the manifolds in the tight space of the Van cab- and the extra load of the motorhome would lead to cooked manifolds.  My parents, my father particularly, loved to charge up to Eisenhower with the pedal matted most of the way, getting something like 2 mpg and in many cases blowing up the manifolds/heads. I also drove that RV all over Colorado and never had a problem simply by accepting that I would take whatever speed I could get climbing passes with keeping the rpm low.

Patience is a very affordable virtue when driving a motorhome.

 

Not necessarily this 460's issues from what you describe but a very common scam that was run for years by RV chassis repair facilities you should all be aware of. This was more prevallent with class A's than Class C's, because many owners never took the engine cover off. Many owners were told they had a cracked head, blown piston, burned valves or anything else really expensive and charged for the repair; quite often it was nothing more than burnt spark plug wires that needed replacing. If you or a family member have a motorhome running very rough, loosing power, or generally sick take a few minutes and check these first. It might save thousands of dollars (if it does please send me the money you save to put into my copter skiing fund).

 

You have been warned, I can sleep better now.

post #71 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

 

Its a 1989 Lazy Daze 22'- with an aircraft aluminum exterior and a Chevy cab with a 350 TBI/TH400. I paid under $5k and it runs great- I bought it and drove it the 300 miles home from the front range 2 days later. It needed me to throw a new water heater in it, replace a few roof vents on their last legs, and to finish the previous owners' job at changing fridges by finishing the open space above the new smaller fridge. 

 

The picture above was taken on our inaugural outing with it to shakedown any problems- not a one. It has both an air conditioner and a swamp cooler that will run on 12V. Freshwater plumbing is all within heated space, but I don't know if I want to trust it in winter.

 

I got 11 MPG running it back home, which I consider a win considering the climbs up La Veta and Wolf Creek passes. Double digit fuel economy driving in mountains is always worth a cheer. I am hoping the fact that it is relatively compact makes it a non deathtrap in snow, although we primarily ski camp in Spring when the roads are *usually* clear save for the final ascent to the ski area.

 

What's the point of having AC and a swamp cooler? I guess if you travel the whole country it could be useful but would the weight savings of removing the swamp cooler make up the difference of running the AC?

post #72 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

What's the point of having AC and a swamp cooler? I guess if you travel the whole country it could be useful but would the weight savings of removing the swamp cooler make up the difference of running the AC?


The entire point of the swamp cooler system is that it runs on 12v with minimum power drain. 5A of 12v vs. 12A of 115v.


AC units require shore power or a Genny, while the swamp cooler can runs for days on battery.
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