or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Core shots on a Watea 84

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I had a core shot done at a local ski shop.  It looks like they used metal grip and then covered with Ptex.  I made a few runs on some manmade snow and the Ptex came right out.  Over the ski season I kept refilling with candle Ptex and had better luck with my Ptex jobs, but it got me wondering if there is an epoxy or a better product I could use to replace the Ptex on top of the metal grip.  This core shot does come into contact with the metal edge.  Can I just dremmel out  the remaining Ptex and then lay down 2 or so layers of Epoxy?  Or should I dremmel out all of the metal grip and Ptex  and go from there.  Thanks.

post #2 of 17

something went haywire somewhere.

 

I have used p-tex over metal grip with stellar and DURABLE results.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

A-man,   do you recommend sticking with Ptex or could you recommend an epoxy type product.  The metal grip seems to be holding great but Ptex doesn't hold as well as I'd like.  Also, I've read metal grip is a great product, so begs the question why not just bring the grip all the way to the surface?  Thanks

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by salmonsoup View Post

A-man,   do you recommend sticking with Ptex or could you recommend an epoxy type product.  The metal grip seems to be holding great but Ptex doesn't hold as well as I'd like.  Also, I've read metal grip is a great product, so begs the question why not just bring the grip all the way to the surface?  Thanks

I use a P-tex gun and I make sure the surrounding p-tex is very warm before I do the P-texx portion of the patch!

 

I think you don't use all Metal grip because although it sticks to the core and metal material I am not sure it melds well with the surrounding surface p-tex and may not be easy to scrape properly down to the surrounding p-tex level.

post #5 of 17

^^^Makes sense to heat the area where you are adding the p-tex.  That will open up any pores and make the application area tacky so it bonds with the p-tex better.  Good call!

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

So, no love for epoxy at all? 

post #7 of 17

I LOVE epoxy, especially that two part stuff for other applications.  See what I did there?

 

Anyway, if you're against metal A-man's spot on here.  See what I did there?

 

Epoxy won't stick to the metal edge as well as the metal grip does.. so I've heard..

post #8 of 17

    What A man said. Try and rough up the metal grip before you heat it and then re apply P-tex. 

 

   zenny

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Sounds good guys thanks a lot. 

post #10 of 17

Metal grip is softer than ptex--that's why it's not used by itself. I haven't had trouble getting ptex to stay in place.  I use ribbon and a cheap soldering-iron-type ptex iron. Sounds like the shop didn't do a good job. They should fix it again for free. Get rid of the candles--ribbon and an iron is cheap, easy, and much more permanent. 

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

The shop did an absolutely terrible job repairing this gouge.  The P-tex, came out after one or two of days of skiing, they removed all of the structure off the bases, there were hanging burrs on both skis,  I assume all of this  from some sort of grind/ sanding job.   And as luck would have it this was the last run or the year and they talked me into "setting up these skis with storage wax,"  which ultimately kept me from me seeing this.  However, its  been a good opportunity to learn from mistakes made.  Over the summer I was hoping to take the time to thoroughly fix the core shot, with some sort of slow curing epoxy, and then bring it back to a different shop and to have them run it through the "wintersteiger"  machine.  I was hoping to find a better, easier product than Ptex.  But if it doesn't exist then Ptex it is.

post #12 of 17

I have a fairly large gouge in my base up against a metal edge and plan on fixing it before the season begins.  Could someone provide a link to this metal grip so I know what to buy?

 

Does one just coat the metal edge with this stuff so the ptex ribbon will stick to it when melted?

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jameson71 View Post

I have a fairly large gouge in my base up against a metal edge and plan on fixing it before the season begins.  Could someone provide a link to this metal grip so I know what to buy?

 

Does one just coat the metal edge with this stuff so the ptex ribbon will stick to it when melted?

Ask and you shall receive!biggrin.gif

 

http://www.tognar.com/metalgrip-repair-string-5-roll-clear-or-black/

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

Ask and you shall receive!biggrin.gif

 

http://www.tognar.com/metalgrip-repair-string-5-roll-clear-or-black/

    Hearken unto me, for Atomicman is both kind and just!  biggrin.gif

 

   zenny

post #15 of 17

And I do appreciate the link.

 

Is there a special technique to this or is it pretty obvious?  I'm thinking heat the area maybe with a hair dryer pretty lightly, melt metalgrip on the metal side of the gouge, let cool and dry, reheat with hair dryer, fill with ptex ribbon/iron as close to flat as possible maybe a tiny bit convex and then I'm planning to use the skivisions tool(s) and a true bar to make sure my bases are flat.

 

Then an edge tune (maybe my first bottom edge tune?) and wax.

post #16 of 17

     An important thing to remember also is that if you have raised areas of base material surrounding the "wound", be sure to trim them first (before metal grip) so they are flush with the rest of the base. Waiting till after can produce less than stellar results...I use a razor blade (carefully) for this. Some will use a sharp chisel (also carefully).

 

    Heating first is also a good idea icon14.gif.

 

    zenny

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

     An important thing to remember also is that if you have raised areas of base material surrounding the "wound", be sure to trim them first (before metal grip) so they are flush with the rest of the base. Waiting till after can produce less than stellar results...I use a razor blade (carefully) for this. Some will use a sharp chisel (also carefully).

 

    Heating first is also a good idea icon14.gif.

 

    zenny

I use a chisel, but that requires that you have the stones and knowledge to sharpen a chisel--should be able to shave hair off your arms with it. And you need the chisel. Unless you use the tools for other things besides skis there are cheaper alternatives. I've also used a block plane to flatten ptex if it's not too close to an edge.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs