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Waxing, how far in advance?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

So my local shop has a half price tunes deal going on. I don't suspect I'll be able to ski until late November. Is a wax this far in advance just a waste or will it stay good months in advance?

post #2 of 16

The wax will stay just as good as it ever was.     It may or not  wind up being the right wax for your funky November conditions.

But if all you need is wax, why pay for a 'tune'?   

consider:
- now is as good a time as any to learn to DIY (you will come out ahead on cost and quite probably also on performance)

- a shop wax job 'just wax' should be cheaper than even a half-price tune.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Because wax isn't the only thing I need, however I was already assuming that edges stay good while not being used wink.gif

post #4 of 16

Then IMO the winner tactic would be to regard the shop wax as a base prep wax - sure it's perfectly skiable if the first snow you see is warm or slushy but keep a block of harder wax on hand in case the first snow is either manmade or colder than ~28F.

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

Being from Connecticut (driving to VT) it's almost a sure thing the snow is going to be manmade. Skiing on a used pair of Bushwackers that I picked up super cheap this summer. I've also heard the Bushwackers can get a little hooky although I haven't ridden them myself yet. Should I specify anything to the shop to make them not that way, or is this more likely the result of fickle reviewers/ a straight up bad tune for them to begin with?

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post

Being from Connecticut (driving to VT) it's almost a sure thing the snow is going to be manmade.

 

Get a harder wax - don't wait until after base burn.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View PostSkiing on a used pair of Bushwackers that I picked up super cheap this summer. I've also heard the Bushwackers can get a little hooky although I haven't ridden them myself yet. Should I specify anything to the shop to make them not that way, or is this more likely the result of fickle reviewers/ a straight up bad tune for them to begin with?

 

I've only two runs on Bushwackers and zero experience tuning them so I'll defer specific answers to those who know the ski.   IME hookiness reports tend to be more related to the skier's lateral balance than anything else.   th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the help, I'll pick up a block of hard wax and let the tuners do their thing for the edges.

post #8 of 16

I'd recommend just leaving the last coat of wax on, slathered over the edges and wait until right before you go skiing to scrape it down. That will keep your edges from rusting and the bases nice until ski time.

post #9 of 16

If your edges are dry when you store your skis, they don't rust.

 

I have never had an edge rust sitting in my garage over the summer.

post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 

They do have a bit of rust on them when they came, not anything a gummystone wont take care of I just haven't been able to get my ass to the store and get one.

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post

They do have a bit of rust on them when they came, not anything a gummystone wont take care of I just haven't been able to get my ass to the store and get one.


The worst rust comes from not cleaning and drying skis after A) skiing manmade snow because it often has some road salt in the water from the bottom retaining ponds.  And B) not cleaning and drying them after transporting them in a nonono2.gif top rack naked.

 

We get a lot of dew in this part of the country, spring, summer, and fall.  A non climate controlled garage would result in damp, dripping wet skis quite often here.  I keep mine in a semi climate controlled walled in porch and still get some dew from time to time.

 

Just depends on where you live relative to climate and average humidity.  I choose to use storage wax (or just regular wax not scraped).

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Storing anything wet seems to generally be a bad idea.

post #13 of 16

Also won't rust below about 37 degrees F

 

My point was in the earlier post, just wax 'em and scrape 'em now so they are ready to roll when the snow flies!

post #14 of 16

I like to wax just a little before the date if possible, so as to avoid stubble being an issue during late night romance but enough before to avoid unsightly red patches...

 

Wait, were we talking about skiing?

post #15 of 16
8 months? I wax them at end of season with warm temp wax, then just scrape and go at beginning of next season.

Then again I'm just a guy putzing around the hill not looking for that half second advantage.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I'd recommend just leaving the last coat of wax on, slathered over the edges and wait until right before you go skiing to scrape it down. That will keep your edges from rusting and the bases nice until ski time.


Storage wax on the base is mandatory.  However wax should not be left on edges at all.  In a humid environment the wax will hold moisture against the edges causing rust.  Wax doesn't "bond" to steel edges like it does to bases.  During the off season, or any off length of time, storage wax should always be applied.  As Dart says here, you scrape and brush it off only just before using the skis again.  As for hooky skis, that is usually a bad tune.

Here is a bit on off season storage.



In this other video you will see how the wax does not bond to the edges.  Because I live in a super dry climate and my shop is very dry air I don't worry about a bit of wax on the edges, but if it is humid you need to remove all wax from the edges.  Good luck!

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