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Looking for an AT ski for former snowboarder in Colorado

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I've been snowboarding for almost 20 years, and would consider myself an competent intermediate. I also like ice climbing and spring alpine climbing. I'm 37 years old, 6'2, 185lbs. Looking for a ski that will be good for hut trips, backcountry touring, skin up, ski down type of stuff and the occasional resort day. I have a bunch of other hobbies, so I cant really afford, or justify a 'quiver', especially since I'm new to skiing. Would be great to find one ski that would do everything.

 

A few friends have suggested the Rossignol Smash 7 in 180cm. I've found that ski locally for a great deal. I've been told this is a good ski for me given my (lack of) experience, intended use, and the price is right. The only thing that is keeping me from pulling the trigger is the fact that almost all of the reviews I've read about this ski mention that it's for the lighter, usually teen rider. Like I mentioned, I'm 185lbs without any gear or clothing on. Is this still a good ski for me at my weight? 

 

Thanks to everyone in advance for your replies!

post #2 of 8

What boots will you be using,  AT or Alpine?  If your just meadow skipping on Tech gear, they might be ok. 

I'd get something burlier and spend some time at a resort, before going BC.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

What boots will you be using,  AT or Alpine?  If your just meadow skipping on Tech gear, they might be ok. 

I'd get something burlier and spend some time at a resort, before going BC.

Sorry, but I thought I mentioned an AT set up, so I'd be using an AT boot and binding. I also just thought it was a given that I would be cutting my teeth in bounds at the resorts for quite a while before venturing into the back country. I've never been skiing in the back country, but have spent a ton of time ice climbing and alpine climbing the back country, which is another reason I'd love to get proficient at skiing to make approaches easier, possibly quicker and opens up a lot of possibilities. Sorry for the confusion!

post #4 of 8

Where are you located BTW?  This makes a big difference.

 

If you've never skied before, it's going to be difficult to just jump in to backcountry skiing.  You have to deal with all sorts of funky snow in the BC (glop, crusts, windboard, etc), which will be very tough on a beginner.  Often you have no choice but to ski this snow to get back to the car.  No taking the groomer if you're not feeling up to the challenge.  Also, if you've never skied before you need mileage/vert to improve.  A pretty big day in the BC might be 5-6K vert, but you can ski this in about an hour at the resort. 

 

If you're serious about BC skiing, you're going to want a tech binding (dynafit/plum) for its lack of weight and tourability, but this would be about the worst binding to learn to ski on.  You'll be falling in the beginning probably, and these aren't the bindings you want to fall on daily and pound at the resort. 

 

Ideally you'd just get a resort setup with alpine bindings and learn to ski.  Then dive into touring when you have some experience. 

 

If you're dead set on getting a 1 quiver ski that can hit the resorts and tour, then I'd look at something with a moderate weight, some tip rocker, and 95-100 underfoot if you're out west, maybe 90ish if you're out east.  Burly bindings like the Salomon Guardian/Atomic Tracker, Tyrolia Adrenalin, and Marker Duke/Baron will be good options for primarily skiing resorts but will handle the occasional tour.  But of course they're heavy and not fun to hike on all day.

 

For western skis I'd suggest something like a Dynastar Cham 97 High Mountain (184 would be best for your size but maybe a 178 since you're a beginner), 180 Blizzard Kabookie, 180 Rossi Soul 7, 180 Rossi Sin 7 (heavier and narrower than the Soul), 180 Salomon Quest 98, or a 177 K2 annex 98.  These are big enough to float but not so big that they can't handle hard snow.  And they're not featherweights but they're not tanks either.  None should be too demanding but they may not be the best skis to learn on. 

 

Good luck.
 

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatsupdoc View Post

Where are you located BTW?  This makes a big difference.

 

If you've never skied before, it's going to be difficult to just jump in to backcountry skiing.  You have to deal with all sorts of funky snow in the BC (glop, crusts, windboard, etc), which will be very tough on a beginner.  Often you have no choice but to ski this snow to get back to the car.  No taking the groomer if you're not feeling up to the challenge.  Also, if you've never skied before you need mileage/vert to improve.  A pretty big day in the BC might be 5-6K vert, but you can ski this in about an hour at the resort. 

 

If you're serious about BC skiing, you're going to want a tech binding (dynafit/plum) for its lack of weight and tourability, but this would be about the worst binding to learn to ski on.  You'll be falling in the beginning probably, and these aren't the bindings you want to fall on daily and pound at the resort. 

 

Ideally you'd just get a resort setup with alpine bindings and learn to ski.  Then dive into touring when you have some experience. 

 

If you're dead set on getting a 1 quiver ski that can hit the resorts and tour, then I'd look at something with a moderate weight, some tip rocker, and 95-100 underfoot if you're out west, maybe 90ish if you're out east.  Burly bindings like the Salomon Guardian/Atomic Tracker, Tyrolia Adrenalin, and Marker Duke/Baron will be good options for primarily skiing resorts but will handle the occasional tour.  But of course they're heavy and not fun to hike on all day.

 

For western skis I'd suggest something like a Dynastar Cham 97 High Mountain (184 would be best for your size but maybe a 178 since you're a beginner), 180 Blizzard Kabookie, 180 Rossi Soul 7, 180 Rossi Sin 7 (heavier and narrower than the Soul), 180 Salomon Quest 98, or a 177 K2 annex 98.  These are big enough to float but not so big that they can't handle hard snow.  And they're not featherweights but they're not tanks either.  None should be too demanding but they may not be the best skis to learn on. 

 

Good luck.
 

Thanks for all the advice. I am well aware that BC skiing is way different than the resorts. Please read my initial post and my follow up comments regarding this. I also mentioned in the title that its a ski for Colorado, so I apologize if that was clear. I've done a lot of ice and alpine climbing in the backcountry, but new to skiing in general. I am fairly confident though, that after a while at the resort I will be able to do a  hut trip or two! Sorry again if that was unclear. I appreciate the advice and guess you possibly didn't notice that I had a particular ski in mind that I listed and was wanting feedback on that ski since it's been recommended to me from several people, and the price is right on it at the moment. All of you advice is much appreciated though. Thank you.

post #6 of 8

Sorry, missed the CO in the title.

 

I did see you asking about the Smash 7.  Realize that I have no personal beta on the Smash 7.  I've never seen it or hand flexed it.  But I'd avoid it.  It's a cap ski, it looks very lightweight (too lightweight), and Rossi markets it to "up and coming rippers" and "future hard chargers."  Sounds like they're marketing it to lighter adolescents.  I imagine you'd overpower it.  But that's pure speculation.

 

I was a climber before I was a serious skier, so I understand where you're coming from.  Alpine climbing will obviously be a huge benefit for your fitness and general mountain sense (and possibly your avy assessment skills), but it won't help you much in learning how to ski, just like having a background in BC skiing won't help you too much in learning how to climb a finger crack.

 

My advice stands for the skis.  Something in the 95-100ish underfoot range with some tip rocker, not too light, not too heavy, should do a lot of things well, in and out of the resort. 

 

Another option for bindings is swap plates from Binding Freedom.  Allows you to switch between alpine and tech binders on the same ski.  It does require some basic knowledge to mount them, swap bindings, readjust the forward pressure each time, etc, so maybe not the best for beginners but could work for you if you're so inclined.

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatsupdoc View Post

Sorry, missed the CO in the title.

 

I did see you asking about the Smash 7.  Realize that I have no personal beta on the Smash 7.  I've never seen it or hand flexed it.  But I'd avoid it.  It's a cap ski, it looks very lightweight (too lightweight), and Rossi markets it to "up and coming rippers" and "future hard chargers."  Sounds like they're marketing it to lighter adolescents.  I imagine you'd overpower it.  But that's pure speculation.

 

I was a climber before I was a serious skier, so I understand where you're coming from.  Alpine climbing will obviously be a huge benefit for your fitness and general mountain sense (and possibly your avy assessment skills), but it won't help you much in learning how to ski, just like having a background in BC skiing won't help you too much in learning how to climb a finger crack.

 

My advice stands for the skis.  Something in the 95-100ish underfoot range with some tip rocker, not too light, not too heavy, should do a lot of things well, in and out of the resort. 

 

Another option for bindings is swap plates from Binding Freedom.  Allows you to switch between alpine and tech binders on the same ski.  It does require some basic knowledge to mount them, swap bindings, readjust the forward pressure each time, etc, so maybe not the best for beginners but could work for you if you're so inclined.

Sweet, thanks! That was my guess as well regarding that particular ski, since I read that it being for up and coming rippers in the description as well! Thanks again for the advice! I'll probably pass on that particular ski.

post #8 of 8

whatsupdoc covered it pretty well.  You really need to get boots first.  What boot you get, will determine what bindings and from there, an appropriate ski. 

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