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Best East Coast Ski (POW, ICE, GROMS) - Page 3

post #61 of 107

Hi Epic Ski Community,

I am about to retire my 2011/12 Volkl AC 50 as my East coast, hard pack/ice ski and was planning on getting the Kendos to replace them. On the other hand I have heard some great things about Kastles and found great deals on the BMX88 ($450), XX90 ($460) and LX92 ($420).

 

I've been on Kendos and but will not have a chance to demo Kastles and don't know much about their lineup.

 

I am 6-2, 215 lbs aggressive skier and hate to retire the AC 50s but their days are numbered. I always feel confident on them no matter how much polished ice can be found on the groomers. Looking for something that holds just as good of an edge but skis a little less stiff on firmer bumps. 

 

My days on this ski would be @ Killington, Sugarbush and Hunter. I am not as worried about soft snow or powder performance since the quiver also includes Fischer Watea 98s @ 186 for the lucky days on soft snow/tree skiing in the east and Volkl Katana for days out west. 

 

Could anyone tell me about the Kastle line up and which of these skis would be the best for me to consider? Again looking at the BMX88, LX92 or the XX90 James? I am assuming that the 88, 90 and 92 is the waist width but does the BMX, LX, XX prefix mean anything?  Sorry if an answer can be found someplace else. Just let me know if there is another thread to check out.

 

Thank you for your reading my post and advice you could provide,

post #62 of 107

BMX and LX are best understood in the context of the MX line, which is Kastle's core all mountain ski. The MX is a stiff ski with metal layers and a traditional camber. On the narrower end of the offering, it is an ideal eastern ski. The BMX line is the "big mountain" version that removes metal and adds rocker. It will be softer flexing and more in its element in softer snow. The LX line is the lighter weight version of the MX, similar overall design but softer flexing for lighter skiers. Unfortunately, I think this means that neither are really ideal for what you are looking for. I honestly don't know much about the XX line other than it is a twin tip parked ski - not sure how it performs elsewhere on the mountain.

 

 

I was going to purchase the AC30 a few years ago but ended up falling in love with the Kastle MX78 after a demo. Based on your description of your skiing, as well as your outgoing ride, I would look for deals (and demo opportunities) on the MX83 or MX88, or possibly the FX84 or 94 which are Kastle's backcountry line but performance-wise very similar to the MXs.

post #63 of 107

I personally prefer Kendos over any Kastle skis. I think they're both similar skis---perfect for hard-charging skiers who's looking to carve on hard pack, groomers, and a pair with no speed limit. For me, it just comes down to graphics at this point. Both Kendos and any of the Kastle skis you mentioned are perfectly suited for East Coast skiing but for me, Kendos offer a little more excitement in the graphics department. Plus, I love their topsheet and how durable it is especially after you've rode them for a day or two on an icy hardpack trails. I like what Kastle is doing with their skis (air tip) but their ski graphics don't excite me as much. It just screams, "I'M AN OLD-SCHOOL RACER!" 

post #64 of 107

Thanks Spinning Wheel

So...

BMX = Big Mtn

MX = All Mtn

LX = Light Weight

XX = Park

FX = Backcountry

 

Based on this none of the skis on sale would work and I need to look at MX83 or MX 88. Assuming that they are the most popular line because I do not see any deals. I'll hold on to my AC 50s for the rest of the season and keep an eye out for a demoing opportunity for Kastle MX line. If not I'll go with the Kendos... unless Phil or someone else jumps in with the VW/Porsche comparison. I am fine ponying up extra cash for the Kastle MXs if they are that much better.

 

It sounds like DouisMaximus is saying the VW/Porsche comparison does not apply and the Kendo is just a good of ski and better value. I definitely fall into the "hard-charging skiers" ans this would be the ski I'd be on when "looking to carve on hard pack, groomers, and a pair with no speed limit" that you described. I don't really care about graphics too much and even the Kendos are kinda plain this season... but it sounds like you are saying the top sheets on the Kastles don't take a beating well? I am fine with scratches but don't want  ski pole holes behind the bindings and gouges coming out.

post #65 of 107

I am an east coast skier too, mostly Hunter, Belleayre, Jiminy Peak, etc... so, I know ice. Never been to Gore, but I plan on it this year. I am 230lbs, 6'1" and started off skiing carving skis, but have moved into fatter skis as my everyday ski out here. I currently ski on the Blizzard ONE (98 width) in a 184 length, and it is amazing. If you can ski the east, you can ski the east on a fat ski. I ski ice, bumps, crud, anything and everything with this ski. Unfortunately they don't make it anymore, but replaced it with the Bonafide, which is supposedly even better. 

 

But, the first fatter ski I tried out here was the Atomic Theory, and I loved it so much, I bought it in the only size my ski shop had in stock 177. Which, in the end, was too short for me. If they had had it in a 186 I would still be on it.

 

I have it for sale with Salomon z12ti bindings (skied a total of 11 times) for $150 bucks if interested.

 

But, I recommend a 88-100 width waist that isn't too stiff, but can still be somewhat stable at speed. For the east it's always nice to have a bit of playfulness for trees and bumps (unless you are a straight up racer/carver). I like to play in all types of terrain and be able to enjoy the deeper snow when we get it. And a mid-90 waisted ski has been perfect for me.

 

Recommend:

 

Atomic Theory or Ritual

Blizzard Bonafide or Brahma

Line Prophet or Sir Francis Bacon

Kastle fx94 (if you can afford it)

Nordica Soul Rider

 

Best.

post #66 of 107

TrialbyICE - great ski recommendations!  All great skis one and all.  Skiing out here in Utah my daily driver is the Atomic Ritual in the 182 length, and the Theory is its skinnier brother.  Both great skis.  The tail shape is helpful with skiing the bumps, but the Ritual is a bit wide to truly make bump skiing fun.

 

Around here the Bonafide and Brahma are popular skis, as well as the ubiquitous Line Prophet.  The Rossi 88 may be another option to think about, too. 

 

T. - www.wasatchreport.com

post #67 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by douismaximus View Post
 

I personally prefer Kendos over any Kastle skis. I think they're both similar skis---perfect for hard-charging skiers who's looking to carve on hard pack, groomers, and a pair with no speed limit. For me, it just comes down to graphics at this point. Both Kendos and any of the Kastle skis you mentioned are perfectly suited for East Coast skiing but for me, Kendos offer a little more excitement in the graphics department. Plus, I love their topsheet and how durable it is especially after you've rode them for a day or two on an icy hardpack trails. I like what Kastle is doing with their skis (air tip) but their ski graphics don't excite me as much. It just screams, "I'M AN OLD-SCHOOL RACER!" 

 

 

lol really?  you like kendos based on graphics alone.... and think that they ski the same. 

post #68 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrialbyICE View Post
 

If you can ski the east, you can ski the east on a fat ski. I ski ice, bumps, crud, anything and everything with this ski. Unfortunately they don't make it anymore, but replaced it with the Bonafide, which is supposedly even better. 

 

But, I recommend a 88-100 width waist that isn't too stiff, but can still be somewhat stable at speed. For the east it's always nice to have a bit of playfulness for trees and bumps (unless you are a straight up racer/carver). I like to play in all types of terrain and be able to enjoy the deeper snow when we get it. And a mid-90 waisted ski has been perfect for me.

 

Recommend:

Atomic Theory or Ritual

Blizzard Bonafide or Brahma

Line Prophet or Sir Francis Bacon

Kastle fx94 (if you can afford it)

Nordica Soul Rider

 

Hi TrialbyIce,

All great skis that you recommend but a lot of them overlap too much with my Watea 98s which have all the playfulness for the trees and soft snow conditions but are less than ideal for about half my days on the East coast.

 

If it is going to be a day where I cannot get into the woods, and stuck on polished groomers I'd rather be on something like my AC 50s, I can open them up, take aggressive turns, and know the edge will be there regardless of whether or not I am on ice. The Wateas don't do it for me on those days.

 

From that list would I think the only one I would consider are the Blizzed Brahma along with the earlier mentioned Volkl Kendo or the Kastle MX83 or 88.

post #69 of 107
Maybe it's me, but I did not really enjoy skiing the MX88s the other day on the hard pack/ice at Jay. It was only the 2nd time I was skiing them this year, and I had them tuned over the summer, so I don't think that was the issue. I am sure some of it was skill set, but I was much happier going to the Blizzard Magnums (76 underfoot) for the ice. I very much preferred the narrower ski on the ice and found it more responsive. However, I loved the MX88s the next day when we got a lot of snow and I had the opportunity to ski in legitimate powder. Overall, I like the MX88s a lot and think they do well in most conditions, but I don't consider them a good ice ski at all.
post #70 of 107
I skied my friends Kastle MX 88 176 I think length one day this week at Vail. Skied hard groomers in the morning some easy bumps. I was left with the impression it's a man's ski and I might not be man enough.

It's a scalpel on hard snow , not my cup of tea in moguls and I learned I like a smaller turning radius for carving. But this ski is rock solid for sure. You could probably go 50 miles an hour and read your emails on your cell phone .

I think I am too light at 168 lbs. to really bend this ski and reap it's rewards. My friend who owns it, demoed the Rossi 88 Experience and bought a pair while we were there. He and I weigh about the same and I think his skiing improved on the 88 . He could ski bumps better and the tighter turning radius improved his skiing I thought. I skied a run on the 88 and thought it was a really fun ski.
post #71 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns View Post

I skied my friends Kastle MX 88 176 I think length one day this week at Vail. Skied hard groomers in the morning some easy bumps. I was left with the impression it's a man's ski and I might not be man enough.

It's a scalpel on hard snow , not my cup of tea in moguls and I learned I like a smaller turning radius for carving. But this ski is rock solid for sure. You could probably go 50 miles an hour and read your emails on your cell phone .

I think I am too light at 168 lbs. to really bend this ski and reap it's rewards. My friend who owns it, demoed the Rossi 88 Experience and bought a pair while we were there. He and I weigh about the same and I think his skiing improved on the 88 . He could ski bumps better and the tighter turning radius improved his skiing I thought. I skied a run on the 88 and thought it was a really fun ski.

 

My default movement patterns make me gravitate initially to skis with a lot of sidecut that pull me into the turn. I even like a relatively wide tail unless it's sharp-cornered and I'm in bumps. Describing the E88 in part here, among other skis, obviously. Haven't skied that ski but Im sure I would like it. At least three regular ski friends are on it.

 

This season, though, I'm experimenting with two different pairs of skis - a race ski and an all-mountain (a Kastle, as it happens) - that are longer, with less shape, and with tip designs that are less assertive when tipped on edge. The jury is still out on the experiment, but it's definitely an  educational experience that I'm enjoying. Unfortunately the gods have frowned on my getting in lots and lots of hours this season so far, but I think there have been some moments where my skiing has improved - or at least gained range - as a result of the experiment. Three closely related aspects of my reaction to the longer, straighter skis: 1) If I am patient with a ski that has a less aggressive shape, it can be an energy saver, as it's easier to make turns at the cadence that I want to make them, vs. what the ski wants. 2) I think it has helped my transitions / edge changes, because the longer, straighter ski seems to punish later / more pivoty / sequential edge changes more, while rewarding an early dive from the old outside to the new inside with an addicting smoothness in the rest of the turn. 3) There is something to be said for the increased flexibility of turn size that seems to come easier with the less turny ski. It feels quieter, more fluid, and more stable when moving into longer turns from shorter turns (and even when moving back again). Obviously part of this has to do with a whole bunch of things besides shape, like flex pattern ... which is why when I went with the longer boards I made a point of looking for ones that were relatively flexy relative to my size, speed, and ability ... which the MX 88 may not be in your case.

post #72 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrialbyICE View Post

I am an east coast skier too, mostly Hunter, Belleayre, Jiminy Peak, etc... so, I know ice. Never been to Gore, but I plan on it this year. I am 230lbs, 6'1" and started off skiing carving skis, but have moved into fatter skis as my everyday ski out here. I currently ski on the Blizzard ONE (98 width) in a 184 length, and it is amazing. If you can ski the east, you can ski the east on a fat ski. I ski ice, bumps, crud, anything and everything with this ski. Unfortunately they don't make it anymore, but replaced it with the Bonafide, which is supposedly even better. 

But, the first fatter ski I tried out here was the Atomic Theory, and I loved it so much, I bought it in the only size my ski shop had in stock 177. Which, in the end, was too short for me. If they had had it in a 186 I would still be on it.

I have it for sale with Salomon z12ti bindings (skied a total of 11 times) for $150 bucks if interested.

But, I recommend a 88-100 width waist that isn't too stiff, but can still be somewhat stable at speed. For the east it's always nice to have a bit of playfulness for trees and bumps (unless you are a straight up racer/carver). I like to play in all types of terrain and be able to enjoy the deeper snow when we get it. And a mid-90 waisted ski has been perfect for me.

Recommend:

Atomic Theory or Ritual
Blizzard Bonafide or Brahma
Line Prophet or Sir Francis Bacon
Kastle fx94 (if you can afford it)
Nordica Soul Rider

Best.
post #73 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by aremis68 View Post

I personally think that any ski over 90 mm is unnecessary on the east coast unless your cruising open blue groomers all day long. Tackling tight icy steeps, trees & stiff moguls on a 98+ mm ski seems like a bit of a chore don't you think? Much easier to progress & work on ones technique with a more appropriate tool for the kind of conditions we get out east 90% of the time.
post #74 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by aremis68 View Post


I personally think that any ski over 90 mm is unnecessary on the east coast unless your cruising open blue groomers all day long. Tackling tight icy steeps, trees & stiff moguls on a 98+ mm ski seems like a bit of a chore don't you think? Much easier to progress & work on ones technique with a more appropriate tool for the kind of conditions we get out east 90% of the time.

 

 

honestly if your good at finding snow this is silly.

 

bumps like narrow skis but tree skiing at least when I am skiing trees you want a fat ski other wise it is a chore. 

post #75 of 107
Not much snow out here these days... frown.gif
post #76 of 107

aremis68m

 

My everyday ski is a Kastle FX84.  AWESOME ski.  I primarily ski Shawnee Peak in Bridgton Maine and Sunday River in Maine with the occasional foray to Sugarloaf when I can string a few days together.  Since we've had basically no real snow falls since early January, I'm on this ski every day.  The bevel is a 1/2 though I'm re-bevelling it to a 1/3 to make it even sharper for those icy days.  It hooks up really easy on the groomers and is extremely precise.  Lot of energy on the rebound when making your turns.  Very energetic ski and a ton of fun.  This year's model has a slight tip rocker.  If you want something w/o tip rocker, you can get the 12/13 year models and earlier.  However, I really like this ski in its tip rocker configuration and wouldn't ski anything else in the east on hard snow days.

 

I can't comment too much on the bumps as I'm a TERRIBLE bump skier.  It has been my mission to improve my bump skiing and am working on it.  Short of angel prayer and fairy dust, I'm not sure if any equipment will make me a better bumps skier other than lots of practice and time.

 

Anyway, to sum it all up, I think the Kastle FX84 is a fantastic ski and is my daily driver.  I currently own an FX94 that I use when we actually get snow and I head into the glades.  I also ski a BMX88 as my knock around snow ski for decent conditions at my local mountain.  I weigh 290 and am 6'2" and am a fairly athletic skier.  I ski the 84 in a 184 length and find that it's perfect for me.  Good luck in your quest.


Bill

post #77 of 107

Le Massif has some very decent tree skiing.  

 

Line Prophet 100s.  I was stunned at how well they hold an edge on the groomers.  Very stable.

post #78 of 107

yup! Pretty soon the world cup will finally wake up and go wider underfoot.....

 

 It's a joke, don't freak on me :duck:

 

   zenny

post #79 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by aremis68 View Post


I personally think that any ski over 90 mm is unnecessary on the east coast unless your cruising open blue groomers all day long. Tackling tight icy steeps, trees & stiff moguls on a 98+ mm ski seems like a bit of a chore don't you think? Much easier to progress & work on ones technique with a more appropriate tool for the kind of conditions we get out east 90% of the time.

 

 

 

 

 

Crazy talk.  Take a walk on the wild side of 100 sometime and when you do let us know what you thought.  Just know this- technology is amazing and fat skis are very useful tools.    

post #80 of 107

Your absolutely right Do Work,technology is amazing right now in fatties but it's just as or maybe more in 70 something rippers right now also!!

post #81 of 107

Anyone else really annoyed by the word "groms"?

post #82 of 107

Uh, it could be short for groomers, or it could mean a good young surfer kid (original meaning), or it could mean any young extreme sport guy who's really into it. Or it could be all, OP being humorous. None of which = particularly irritating to me. :dunno

post #83 of 107
[quote name="Do Work" url="/t/121148/best-east-coast-ski-pow-ice-groms/60#post_1681228"Crazy talk.  Take a walk on the wild side of 100 sometime and when you do let us know what you thought.  Just know this- technology is amazing and fat skis are very useful tools.    



[/quote
that all depends on how & where one skis. It also depends on what that individual is asking that ski to do. I have a pair of LP 100's & while I love them in most conditions, I feel that they are the wrong tool to use when I'm trying to tackle narrow steeps & moguls. I will also acknowledge that a good part of this is my lacking technique - but I simply can't see a ski over 100 mm's helping me out in those circumstances. So call me CRAZY bro, but that's just MHO as they say here on the forum.
post #84 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by aremis68 View Post

[quote name="Do Work" url="/t/121148/best-east-coast-ski-pow-ice-groms/60#post_1681228"Crazy talk.  Take a walk on the wild side of 100 sometime and when you do let us know what you thought.  Just know this- technology is amazing and fat skis are very useful tools.    



[/quote
that all depends on how & where one skis. It also depends on what that individual is asking that ski to do. I have a pair of LP 100's & while I love them in most conditions, I feel that they are the wrong tool to use when I'm trying to tackle narrow steeps & moguls. I will also acknowledge that a good part of this is my lacking technique - but I simply can't see a ski over 100 mm's helping me out in those circumstances. So call me CRAZY bro, but that's just MHO as they say here on the forum.

 

a LP 100 is vastly different from soft forgiving 100 mm rockered twin tip. 

post #85 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

a LP 100 is vastly different from soft forgiving 100 mm rockered twin tip. 
[/quot




And that soft rockered twin tip does absolutely nothing for me in the icy hard conditions that we've got out here right now.
post #86 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by aremis68 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

a LP 100 is vastly different from soft forgiving 100 mm rockered twin tip. 
[/quot




And that soft rockered twin tip does absolutely nothing for me in the icy hard conditions that we've got out here right now.

 

 

ummm I can ski a rockered twin tip on most icey conditions. 

post #87 of 107
We'll - I suppose in the end it comes down to ones personal preference. I prefer the feeling of having the entire ski underneath me when
the conditions are firm. Stable, satisfying.
post #88 of 107

Unicorn,

 

I a little bigger than you, 6'4", 250 lbs  but have a similar ski need. I have demo'd a lot of skis over the last couple of years. I would divide east coast hard snow ice skis into two groups:

 

80 ish all around front side skis:   Blizzard Brahma, MX 78, 83, 88, Kastle Rx12, Rossi Exper 88, Dynastar Contact TI, Nordica Fire Arrow 84 EDT, Blizzard Magnum 8.0, 8.5 TI

 

70 ish race skis, slalom or GS:  for these I find the best are racestock skis in either slalom or GS cuts.

 

You probably would like the 80 series since you are coming from the AC50. The list above in their 180+ lengths would all be good skis in my opinion for your intent. If you want them to be somewhat of an all around hard conditions ski. They all can handle ice and clumpy man made snow equally well.

 

If you want a true ice ski, get a race stock ski, for a big person, there is nothing as solid and grippy on ice, period, end of sentence. For someone my size, the stiffness is just right. I realize that won't apply to most people. I have no trouble taking a race stock slalom ski through a mogul field.

 

I own a race stock SL and GS ski for my hard condition skis, and a 100 mm Skilogik Chariot for my soft snow ski. So I am race ski biased. The only ski I would not mind adding to my quiver would be the Brahma. It has a very relaxed forgiving personality but it can still rip a turn on hard pack and ski smoothly through soft choppy snow. If I hadn't bought any new skis and bought the Brahama first, that would have ended my search and I would have been happy with a one ski east coast quiver. As you can probably tell, I really liked the Brahma. 

post #89 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by yossarian143 View Post

Maybe it's me, but I did not really enjoy skiing the MX88s the other day on the hard pack/ice at Jay. It was only the 2nd time I was skiing them this year, and I had them tuned over the summer, so I don't think that was the issue. I am sure some of it was skill set, but I was much happier going to the Blizzard Magnums (76 underfoot) for the ice. I very much preferred the narrower ski on the ice and found it more responsive. However, I loved the MX88s the next day when we got a lot of snow and I had the opportunity to ski in legitimate powder. Overall, I like the MX88s a lot and think they do well in most conditions, but I don't consider them a good ice ski at all.

 

I had the same problem that was resolve by going from 2 to 3° side edges but also by moving my bindings 1 cm front of the line! Now they are awesome!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

honestly if your good at finding snow this is silly.

 

bumps like narrow skis but tree skiing at least when I am skiing trees you want a fat ski other wise it is a chore. 

There is at least 2 kind of tree skiing where I ski: the skied out tree skiing that I ski with my Speed course ti and the full of snow tree skiing that I will ski with something larger depending of if it drop fust a few cm or 1 feet!

 

 

Another ski I tried lately and that could become my best east coast ski are the Brahma...

post #90 of 107
what length and how much do you weigh
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jhernon View Post

For the east, or really for anywhere, I would suggest a good eastern carving ski or a narrower sidecut GS racing ski.  As long as you get them long enough, they will work just fine in the powder, and give you the performance you want in any other type of conditions or terrain.  (Unless you are heavy for you height, a length that is the same as your height should make a great all mountain ski.)  I use a Volkl Racetiger GS ski as my only ski, and have nothing but compliments for it (hardpack, moguls, trees, powder, etc.).
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