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Best East Coast Ski (POW, ICE, GROMS) - Page 2

post #31 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by douismaximus View Post
 

I agree with @Joe Matta. If I were you, I'd go with either Volkl Mantra or Blizzard Bonafides. Both are 98 underfoot which is perfect for both hard packs and light powder days. Both have slight early rise. Both are layered with titanal sheet to help with the stability when you want to open it up. And they both have really good sidewall construction for torsional rigidity. I have friends who own both skis and they're fantastic. Not great for switch skiing since both skis' tails are fairly flat but these are perfect front-side carving skis. Although, I hate the 2014 graphics (or the lack thereof) on Volkl Mantras. They're like old GS racing ski graphics. I wish they kept the asian dragon themed graphics. So for pure asthetics, I'd go with the Bonafide. 

 

+1 on dragon graphics. 2014 graphic is a joke comparing to 2013. but...I think the only thing changed in mantra is the graphic so try get a '13 pair?(could be wrong on this)

post #32 of 107

Heh, I like the simpler Mantra graphics for this year. To each his own. 

post #33 of 107
Another vote for two skis. Get some lightly used 70-something carvers and some 90- 100 something rockered. If you can only swing one, though, will depart from group and say that a low to mid 80's will have more utility. Why? Because the number of days when the trees don't have fresh snow, or only get 2". Is waay more than the number of days you'll need a 100 mm. Most of the time, tree skiing is soft bump skiing, or not so soft bump skiing, with a few stashes of a few inches of pow. But unlike bumps on trails, these have large hard objects to punish you if you miss a slot. So a narrower, quicker ski with some float will be a lot more pleasant than a 95 mm. And safer. It will also be better on the groomers. So all depends if you live for the 15% of the days with actual powder over 3", or want to maximize your pleasure the other 85%.
post #34 of 107

Yes, Mt Snow is different than out west, but I had the advantage of being shown around by locals, and they new all the good spots.  And, they had just had 18 inches of snow.

post #35 of 107

I don't have any videos posted on Epicski, but there are a few photos.

post #36 of 107

FWIW, looked up a number of snowfall records for Mt. Snow area, several different sites. Snowiest month seems to be January, averages about 17-18" total, spread over about 8 days of more than .01" of snow. February has a lower total, 12-14", and about same number of days. But we all tend to recall that, ah, epic day we had, and I'm sure you all skied in 18" of fresh, which is highly typical of the lower western corner of Vermont...:D

post #37 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

FWIW, looked up a number of snowfall records for Mt. Snow area, several different sites. Snowiest month seems to be January, averages about 17-18" total, spread over about 8 days of more than .01" of snow. February has a lower total, 12-14", and about same number of days. But we all tend to recall that, ah, epic day we had, and I'm sure you all skied in 18" of fresh, which is highly typical of the lower western corner of Vermont...:D

 

Just this evening I had a brief aging-guy sort of conversation with a colleague, in which I described having thought about certain memorable events in my young adulthood, at the time they happened, as modestly satisfying "first steps" on a climb toward really meaningful achievement in the future. In retrospect I now see that almost all of these were first steps on a stairway that, in my case, turned out only to have one step. So when I was looking forward to great rewards I was actually experiencing the great reward - or at least such reward as I would ever turn out to be due - in that very moment, but was too stupid or hopeful or naive or whatever to appreciate it. 

post #38 of 107

Heard great things about the Blizzard Bonafide's. Can't go wrong with them. But I'm a Volkl guy.The Mantra's appeal to my alpine side, but I just ordered a pair of Kendos. Suspect they are better all mts -- as in dropping into narrow, gladed, bumped chutes and expecting a stable, pliant platform AND hitting the groomed FIS run at 9am at speed. I'm 6'0", 170 lbs and got 177's. First pair of phatt skis and I can't wait.

post #39 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

So when I was looking forward to great rewards I was actually experiencing the great reward - or at least such reward as I would ever turn out to be due - in that very moment, but was too stupid or hopeful or naive or whatever to appreciate it. 

The most clearly Buddhist comment I've read on Epic. And nicely put, BTW, whatever metaphysic we buy into. Been there.  Thumbs Up

post #40 of 107
This post asks for the "ultimate" EC mtn ski which is the Kastle MX88. Yep, it costs a bit more now (paid 550 with bindings at end of season for mine) but it rips! Personnally would not bother with a 2nd pow ski for EC, just rent when blessed with 8" or more of fresh.
post #41 of 107

You will not need powder skis at Jiminy Peak.  Trust me.  They get 3 or 4 bonafide powder days a year.  If you have a job or a family you'll be lucky to make one of them.  The 15% rule about powder days doesn't apply here.  It's 3-4% at Jiminy.  Hate to kill the buzz.  Buy something under 90 mm.  Rent that one day it really snows.

 

Also: on a good day, the snow at Jiminy is particularly firm.  Opinions vary on this, but many good Jiminy skiers find sub-80 mm skis most suitable.

post #42 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Heh, I like the simpler Mantra graphics for this year. To each his own.

 

+1

post #43 of 107

I suppose that is why they chose not to stay open an extra couple of weeks this past season.  Oh wait, they did stay open later than expected, must have been all the rain that caused that.

post #44 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

 
So when I was looking forward to great rewards I was actually experiencing the great reward - or at least such reward as I would ever turn out to be due - in that very moment, but was too stupid or hopeful or naive or whatever to appreciate it. 
The most clearly Buddhist comment I've read on Epic. And nicely put, BTW, whatever metaphysic we buy into. Been there.  icon14.gif

You need to ride the lift with bumpfreaq. That is an instant keel-evening experience.
post #45 of 107

Line SFB- 108 waist

Rossi Pursuit Hp- 80 waist

 

This combo killed it last season. I would recommend the Rossi for pretty much anyone who can make decent turns on the groomed. The SFB is definitely not an everyone ski, it just happened to fit in perfectly with what I was looking to get out of skiing.

 

But like others suggested two skis is the way to go. One skinny/midfat and one midfat/fat, depending where you want to put those boundaries is up to you. 

I personally consider anything under 80mm "skinny", midfat 85-100mm, fat 105mm and up. Obviously there are some holes you can fill in there.

post #46 of 107

I bought a few pairs of new skis over the last couple of years and spent a lot of time researching and demo'ing. I ski Maine, NH, and Vt. I went the two ski route, along with a race stock gs ski for midweek cruising on groomers for my speed fix.

 

My 2 cents:

 

Blizzard Brahmas    almost race ski like carving, very relaxed and forgiving, handles crud and soft snow very well, can pivot if needed due to some rocker, only short coming will be deep snow, but come on, we are talking East Coast here. It will handle deep snow, just not float much.

 

Other choices:  Kastle MX line, 78-88 all good.

 

If two pairs, like others have said, a narrower carver for firm high energy days and a wider softer ski for soft and deep snow days (and crud).

 

 

If I had skied the Brahmas before buying other skis, they would have been it for me.

 

My spec's:  6'4", 250 lbs, expert skier

post #47 of 107

     Interesting thread; beyond's posts re 15% or lower of powder(trees). Sorry to hijack it. I am also looking for an East Coast ski, with room for EC powder. Yet I want to be realistic. I ski Windham, Belleayre, Okemo, will be going to Whiteface. and Hunter. Groomers. Will not actually "tree ski", yet would like to cut through them to another run, and ungroomed under the lifts. My main concern is the ungroomed mess towards the middle to end of day and mush at the bottom of the mountains. And of course if I am lucky enough to ski a day of fresh snow(nature), or snow from the guns. Could I get away with a ski having only 83", 84" waist? I WAS leaning towards demoing anything 88 to 90, yet why bother if it will not be neccessary.

post #48 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alohaed View Post
 

     Interesting thread; beyond's posts re 15% or lower of powder(trees). Sorry to hijack it. I am also looking for an East Coast ski, with room for EC powder. Yet I want to be realistic. I ski Windham, Belleayre, Okemo, will be going to Whiteface. and Hunter. Groomers. Will not actually "tree ski", yet would like to cut through them to another run, and ungroomed under the lifts. My main concern is the ungroomed mess towards the middle to end of day and mush at the bottom of the mountains. And of course if I am lucky enough to ski a day of fresh snow(nature), or snow from the guns. Could I get away with a ski having only 83", 84" waist? I WAS leaning towards demoing anything 88 to 90, yet why bother if it will not be neccessary.

 

If you are going to try to stick to groomers most of the time you could probably get away with something in the 80-85mm waist range. It sounds to me like you're more concerned about chop and crud so depending on your weight you may want to look at some stiffer skis that will bust through that stuff, maybe a ski with a wider shovel and some "tip rocker". If you are only going to cut through areas of trees from time to time I wouldn't even consider it a factor in your search.

post #49 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alohaed View Post
 

     Interesting thread; beyond's posts re 15% or lower of powder(trees). Sorry to hijack it. I am also looking for an East Coast ski, with room for EC powder. Yet I want to be realistic. I ski Windham, Belleayre, Okemo, will be going to Whiteface. and Hunter. Groomers. Will not actually "tree ski", yet would like to cut through them to another run, and ungroomed under the lifts. My main concern is the ungroomed mess towards the middle to end of day and mush at the bottom of the mountains. And of course if I am lucky enough to ski a day of fresh snow(nature), or snow from the guns. Could I get away with a ski having only 83", 84" waist? I WAS leaning towards demoing anything 88 to 90, yet why bother if it will not be neccessary.

 

Short answer, yes, waist in the low 80s will be fine for you. And a few mm here are there - e.g., the difference between an 84 and an 88 or between an 84 and an 80 - are not the biggest factor anyway.

 

Based on your description above (and doing a small amount of reading between the lines), you are pretty much the poster child for illustrating the disparity between how and what most east coast skiers actually do and what the industry's marketing machine has you thinking about doing when you're looking at skis. Good on ya' for being honest about that.

 

When you talk about "ungroomed mess towards the middle to end of day" you are not describing what most folks on Epic would call "ungroomed." I call that "post-groomed," and it's what you inevitably get at big high-traffic areas like most of the ones you name, whose stock in trade is wide fall-line trails with tons of snowmaking and grooming. Scraped off boiler plate interspersed with big piles of sugar. We've all been there, and many of us - like you - "live" there. A few years ago when the Volkl AC series of "wide carvers" - and similar models from other manufacturers, such as the Atomic Nomads and Nordica Hot Rods - were first big, at least one person here observed that he thought those skis and skis like them were intentionally made for exactly this audience and set of conditions. I'm inclined to agree. Bottom line is do not be waylaid by talk of "powder" and "off-piste" and "trees" and "98mm all mountain skis." You are not skiing those conditions, and would be better served by something with better hard-pack chops.

post #50 of 107

So adkfebo, what is it you don't like about your Atomic Panics?   Looking at the Panics numbers, camber, ski ingredients, I would think these would make a fun New England tree ski, No? 

post #51 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

When you talk about "ungroomed mess towards the middle to end of day" you are not describing what most folks on Epic would call "ungroomed." I call that "post-groomed," and it's what you inevitably get at big high-traffic areas like most of the ones you name, whose stock in trade is wide fall-line trails with tons of snowmaking and grooming. Scraped off boiler plate interspersed with big piles of sugar. We've all been there, and many of us - like you - "live" there. A few years ago when the Volkl AC series of "wide carvers" - and similar models from other manufacturers, such as the Atomic Nomads and Nordica Hot Rods - were first big, at least one person here observed that he thought those skis and skis like them were intentionally made for exactly this audience and set of conditions. I'm inclined to agree. .

Second this. (Was other one of the two or three here who always cheered wide carvers.) Something like the Kendo or Steadfast, bit on the shorter side, handles post-groomed nicely. There was a Nordica, Hellcat, I think, that really rocked in those conditions, RIP. I have a Mantra for that purpose. Suspect the new Brahma would work well. The other approach is to ski it on a GS cheater, keep on your edges, slice and dice. Most prefer the buster approach, but a narrow stiff ski has its rewards too.  

post #52 of 107

Ok. Thanks for the answers. You guys are great. One more questions if you won't mind then. Whether I demo a Kendo, RTM84, Atomic Blackeye or Rossi Experience, I want something to make quick short turns. For skinny trails, and eventually the steeps when I take lessons. Normally I make wide easy turns. I am not a fast aggreesive skier, not pushing skis to their limits. I ski blues, nice and easy, cruising for fun. So I am not concerned about stability. I am 6' tall, 220 lbs. Go with a length in the mid 170s?

post #53 of 107

Yeah, a ski for Jiminy Peak : Trees , Powder, Bumps is a little laughable as Jiminy is openly hostile to all three of those surfaces (they groom aggressively, on powder days!).

 

However, Gore is a great and very diverse east coast bump with lots of tight trees and bump runs.   So let's be specific-You want a ski that will hold a tight bump line on Rumor, Chatimeac, Upper Steilhang, and Lies, but also slither through the Dark Side Glades and not be a total dog on the groomers and handle deeper snow with aplomb-correct?

 

Ok, first of all, while maybe someone can make a gs race tiger work in those conditions-it is the most ridiculous recommendation on this thread (I'm sure there are coordinated carpenters out there that can drive nails with a monkey wrench, too-but I'd still recommend a hammer).  

Secondly, Josh's advice aout two skis is dead on and his 3 part list is also a very good starting point for getting the right ski.

 

 

Thirdly, if I were to recommend one ski for the above conditions-I'd recommend the Icelantic Shaman in a short length.   It's East Coast (or west coast) versatility is phenomenal.   

 

Do not buy a step down GS ski as your only ski.

post #54 of 107

Having a step down GS ski, or even a step down SL ski, will still leave you wanting a better ski for off-piste, tight trees, and bumps.  These stiff skis are at a big disadvantage in those conditions; they suck in those conditions.

 

On the other hand, soft full rocker skis (like the RTM84) suck on the hard pack.  Some folks will say they work well on hard pack, but they have just set the bar too low.  Courvoisier VS is good, until you've had the XO.  I guess, some people don't care about hard pack performance, and consider the groomed run a highway back to the lift.  These folks don't know what they are missing.  There is nothing quite like being in a high speed high-g turn and snapping through a quick transition into a high-g turn in the opposite direction.

 

A good two-pair ski quiver for your conditions would be Fischer WC SC AND a Blizzard Bushwhacker

 

If you are really stuck on having only one pair of skis consider the RTM75IS. It has tip rocker but is cambered underfoot, and a waist width more suited for what you would see most days.

post #55 of 107

a lot is a matter of opinion.  the racetiger would work fine for all of those trails and glades mentioned, but not as ideal in the woods, and definitely not as ideal when it snows.  I'd buy a wider skis just for the versatility in mixed conditions, and for when it snows at gore.  to me is why it really makes sense to have a wider ski, with the snowfall some rocker and width, is really really gonna help, plus anywhere the terrain isn't groomed.  I ski the same places you ski most of the time.  at pays a lot to keep edges sharp since the conditions are often ice like.

 

currently I have:

182 volkl six stars

177 atomic theories

 

I use the theories everyday.  The advantages outweigh the disadvantages, although I could see on some days, and steeper, icy trails, the edge grip is much better on the six stars, or for carving down trails maybe a tad nicer, but not enough to warrant bringing them out.

 

this year I plan to ad the ritual or mantra to the mix, slightly taller than 177.  this is because they are a little stiffer, and the theory is more of a fun ski, but not as stable at high speeds (it still skis fine).

post #56 of 107

I can't recommend any specific skis for you -- your height and weight are too different from mine and, in addition, I've just started demoing new skis myself. However, the one recommendation I will make is to demo before you buy.  There are essentially three ways to demo skis:

1) Rent from a shop.  Disadvantage: the shop is not on the mountain, so you need to drive back to the shop to change skis.  Advantage: some shops demo the top-end skis, and will apply the cost of rental toward your purchase.

2) Rent on the mountain.  Advantage: can swap out skis right in the lodge (and the mountain's shop will also typically apply the cost of the demos to the skis).  Disadvantage: On-mountain shops tend not to carry the top-end skis.

3) Go to a demo day:  Advantages: (1) can swap out skis right on the mountain, which is even faster than with #2; (2) free; (3) you get to try the top-end skis.  Disadvantage: generally can use the ski for only a couple of runs, so it's hard to try it in multiple conditions.

 

Given these options, I'd strongly encourage you to hit as many early-season demo days (or even better, a demo weekend, if someone has it) as possible. Note also that one of the key benefits of demoing is not only to find a ski that you like, but (perhaps even more important) to find what length works best for you in that ski.  For this, option #3 is especially useful.

post #57 of 107

Hello, I recently purchased a pair of Ski Logik Front Burners, 178cm length for primarily East Coast skiing (Hunter / Killington). I am 5'11", 180lbs, intermediate to advanced aggressive skier. Before I blow more $$$ on finishing the set up with bindings; are these skis appropriate? Is there a brand / model that is superior with regard to a "one quiver east coast ski"???? What about bindings????

I also purchased a pair of Salomon CS Pro Falcons. Thanks guys.

post #58 of 107

Skilogik Front Burners are 84 underfoot with a traditional pin tail. I think these are perfectly fine for east coast carving skis. Anyone who is used to GS skiing and staying on the groomers will probably be fine on these. 

post #59 of 107
I was definitely target audience for the Atomic Nomad Blackeye last year. East Coast (Atlantic Canada) small hill guy, with annual forays to Sugarloaf. Intermediate looking to improve and went from 68 mm Head TT, to K2 Apache, finally last year to the Atomic Nomad. I rarely head into trees, am taking lessons for moguls and just wanted an all round ski for fun for my 90% on groomed runs. In the seven years since I came back to skiing i have vague memories of being at a hill with "powder" (fresh snow may be more accurate)deeper than a couple inches maybe once or twice. Those times I believe i grabbed a wider demo than my carvers and it was fine. Will see what happens with the Nomads should i be on hill during a powder day.

On a very positive note, we are skiing out here about a week earlier than normal, I think its looking good in the East.
post #60 of 107

Thank you for your response Maximus; I appreciate the affirmation.

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