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Have to move, where are some good ski resorts not near popular places to live? - Page 2

post #31 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post

Take a look in the Santa Fe, NM, area.  I did a 2 minute search and saw several nursing type positions open in Santa Fe, Espanola, and Taos.  

I have a niece who is an RN/mid-wife.  She has worked throughout Colorado and NM and has never had a problem finding a job.

I have a lot of friends that are nurses in northern NM, and from what they tell me you need to be careful about where you work. PM me if you're thinking about northern NM. I hear Presbyterian in Albuquerque is a good outfit to work for. But that seems like a popular area to live, for certain values of popular.

And fer chrissakes, get on your google. What does the google say about skiing in Texas? Or jobs in areas that meet your criteria (whatever those are) for that matter?
post #32 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by NutellaonToast View Post

but seriously, I thougth there was some skiing if you were in El Paso or something. Nothing?

 

 

 Seriously, did you miss your geography lessons? This should help...

 

http://www.skitexas.com/texas_ski_areas.shtml

post #33 of 52

Ski Apache is 2 hrs from El Paso.

post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by KrocStyle View Post

Utah and Colorado are WAY bigger than the Wasatch and Front Range....

 

Try Durango, Grand Junction, Edwards and Montrose for CO starters....

 

Yep, add Gunnison, Salida, Glenwood Springs, Alamosa....  there are a number of pretty remote ski areas in Colorado, but less so in Utah.  The nice thing is where you are at with your skiing is you should be happy for a year or two at a smaller ski area.  After you gain work experience you'll have the option to move up to bigger ski areas if you choose.

 

Put these to together:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_hospitals_in_Colorado

http://www.onthesnow.com/colorado/map.html

 

And I'll bet you find something in Colorado, but try the same in the other western states too.

post #35 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by east or bust View Post

 

 

Butte, MT... Crested Butte...St. James Health Care

 

 

FYI: There is good skiing near Butte, MT, but Crested Butte is over 800 miles away in Colorado.

post #36 of 52
Many of the least populous states are skiing/mountain states - think AK, VT and WY. MT, NH and ID are also in the top 10 least populous. As far as pop density, AK, WY and MT are 50, 49 and 48. Many other mt states with similarly low densities. Wikipedia data, but I think it's accurate.
post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by NutellaonToast View Post

So, where are the good ski resorts in less popular places to live? Montana? Idaho?  Is there anything decent in Texas?  Or do you happen to know of a hospital hiring inexperienced nurses with ski lift access?  Is there a spot which is far and away the best skiing and I should focus all of my energy there?

 

Suggestions?

 

 

Northern Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine are some places to consider if you really love to ski and are OK with elevations under 6K.  Nothing much above the tree lines but pretty good back woods skiing up there, and plenty of good hospitals around. 

 

Follow the crowds west or find some sweet secret stashes in the northeast if you can handle the cold and ice. 

post #38 of 52

Have you looked at some of the new grad programs some hospitals have? Sometimes they are hiring only new grads as part of their cost savings I would assume. St Lukes Medical Center here in Boise has a new grad program, same hospital that was mentioned before for Sun Valley, ID. Although, it's hard to believe you would be ablle to afford living close to Sun Valley with a new grad salary.

 

I would try some major area hospital that have new grad programs, I think it's your best bet! SLC, Reno, somewhere in Colorado, Seattle area

post #39 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by KrocStyle View Post

Utah and Colorado are WAY bigger than the Wasatch and Front Range....

 

Try Durango, Grand Junction, Edwards and Montrose for CO starters....

 

Seriously! Either the OP needs to do a LOT more research, or he has some additional very specific criteria that he's not sharing with us.

 

Also, If there WAS skiing in Texas, I doubt anybody in their right mind would want to move there for it.

 

Getting a job at St. Anthony Hospital in Summit county is probably pretty damned tough. So go give Rio Grande Hospital a call, located in Del Norte, CO. http://rio-grande-hospital.org/?page_id=82

 

You have Wolf Creek (more snow than anywhere in Colorado and the vast majority of the intermountain west) as your home area 30 minutes West. 1 1/2 hour to Taos. 1 1/2 hour to Monarch, about 2 1/2 to Crested Butte. You are in a large valley with tons of history ringed by some of the most beautiful mountains in Colorado, with a National Park in the valley.

 

Or there is Mercy in Durango- http://www.mercydurango.org/careers-244  DMR is 20 minutes away, Silverton is an hour and change. Telluride is 2 and change. Wolf Creek is 2 and change. Taos is 3 and change, but still doable for day skiing. You live in the mountain bike capital of the United States, in a real city that does a very good job managing being a tourist destination yet not being the land of $10 beers and $20 burgers. There are also 6 breweries and counting.  The San Juans have some of the best BC skiing in existence- a lot of Durangoites never buy a pass, they just ski the passes.

 

Rifle, CO. http://grandriverhospitaldistrict.org/ You wake up each morning looking at the 2000 foot tall cliffs that make up the West side of town. Sunlight is 45 minutes away, all of the Aspen areas are an hour and change. Powderhorn is an hour, Steamboat is 2. Housing is dirt cheap ($150,000 gets you a nice 3 bed 2 bath house all day long), you have recreation and wilderness all around.  See also Glenwood Springs, 20 minutes East- also has a hospital.

 

There are TONS of towns like this all over the West.  I'm naming the above because I am familiar with them, and have lived in both Rifle and Durango.  There are tons of nice, affordable places to live, (especially coming from California!!!!) that have skiing a close drive away-certainly much closer than Denver.  You need hospitals within about an hours drive of anywhere to keep people alive. Writing them off is just silly.  If you actually want to get a job in a cool place, just start googling "[insert town here] hospital" and start flooding resumes. You will get a call eventually. This is how people find jobs.

 

If you are complaining about job opportunities as a new nurse, GET SOME PERSPECTIVE. Most of us don't have jobs that exist in virtually every single town in America in fields that have critical shortages of qualified persons.  Most of us will never work in fields where we will ever even have the chance to get a signing bonus, but that can be a definite reality in nursing. My sister had 2 years experience as an RN before she decided to move back to Colorado from Georgia. She wanted to work at a level 3 facility in Denver and had other specific requirements as to what she would be doing. Her job search lasted about a week, and she had something like 3 offers.  She earns in the upper 5 figures.

 

I know plenty of brand new nurses.  None of them have had ANY problem getting work in Colorado.  If you can't find work, it is your process in finding work that is the issue. 

post #40 of 52

I'm not getting the correlation of remoteness to more nursing jobs? I would think there is less opportunity. Shouldn't you be looking for opportunities near skiing regardless of "popularity"? A bigger metropolis will mean more hospitals and therefore more jobs. Personally I would be looking in SLC and Reno. All you need is one opening. 

post #41 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL View Post

I'm not getting the correlation of remoteness to more nursing jobs? I would think there is less opportunity. Shouldn't you be looking for opportunities near skiing regardless of "popularity"? A bigger metropolis will mean more hospitals and therefore more jobs. Personally I would be looking in SLC and Reno. All you need is one opening. 

 

While I agree that being more remote does not automatically mean more jobs, my point was that there are hospitals and job openings everywhere in places smack dab in the middle of epic skiing. 

 

Nursing is one of those few and far between jobs where there are openings everywhere that allow you to both earn a solid living wage AND have a great deal of freedom over where you live. The only job I can think of that is similar is being a schoolteacher, only you earn more and can have a much more flexible skiing schedule being a nurse.

 

But yeah, laying down a blanket statement that the OP needs to move out of state to get a job, and can't live in one of the prime skiing states is just not accurate- If the OP can't get a nursing job, I think the problem has to be more related to needing resume work and job interview training.  The OP has a profession that has an easier time finding work right now than just about any worker that has ever existed- Lack of experience should not be a significant obstacle when the health care industry needs every nurse they can get their hands on.

post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanvg View Post

 

FYI: There is good skiing near Butte, MT, but Crested Butte is over 800 miles away in Colorado.

 

 

I knew that sounded fishy! Hey it was late and I was delusional roflmao.gif

post #43 of 52

This thread gave me an idea.  I bet an indoor ski area would make millions in Dallas or Houston.

post #44 of 52
Thread Starter 

This thread escalated quickly.

 

Thanks for offering to help me with my resume, guys.  PM me with your tips. I have lots of time to listen.

post #45 of 52

Have you tried the Sacramento Metro Area ???

 

Or ...

 

Chico/Oroville

 

Maybe a correctional facility 

 

You got a CA license, start beating the bushes

post #46 of 52
Thread Starter 

All of Cali is rough.  People getting jobs are either getting them through personal connections, or are willing to take positions in subacute care and it still takes them a while.  A few get lucky and land jobs in hospitals, though frequently in specialities they aren't as interested in. Even very strong applicants struggle

 

I'd rather move and get a position at a hospital in a specialty that appeals to me than stick around agonizing for months and then finally settle on a nursing home because that's all I can get. hence this thread.

 

Right now I'm leaning towards either Bozeman area, about which I've heard some wonderful things, or Western Colorado.  I like what people have been saying about the Eastern PNW as well.

 

Thanks to everyone that has been helpful :)

post #47 of 52

Nurse jobs: Spokane, Couerdalene, Kellogg, St. Maries, Sandpoint, Post Falls etc.  5 ski areas and 2-3 hrs drove to Red Mt or Whitewater BC.  Warm? well no this is not Seattle lows in the teens very common, good snow, no crowds on slopes.  Note the crowds:

 

 

silver 2012 005.JPG

 

Lookout Pass Ski area, Mullan Idaho 

 

IMG_0784.JPG

 

 

Big red cats  Rossland BC  6 miles across the border

 

IMG_0534.JPG

 

Silver Mt. Idaho Kellogg

 

IMG_0784.JPG

 

Ski bud Randy at Whitewater last year.

 

Randy in the Powder Whitewater BC

 

 

Some powder off Chair 3 on Northside (my tracks) Pete

 

 

My tracks backside Lookout PASS Notice the crowds.

post #48 of 52

Pete, why are you showing him the crowd pics.  Your going to scare this guy away and maybe you can get him to buy the beer.  beercheer.gif

 

Perhaps the OP is interested in Texas for the speed flying?  cool.gif

post #49 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

Nurse jobs: Spokane, Couerdalene, Kellogg, St. Maries, Sandpoint, Post Falls etc.  5 ski areas and 2-3 hrs drove to Red Mt or Whitewater BC.  Warm? well no this is not Seattle lows in the teens very common, good snow, no crowds on slopes.  Note the crowds:

 

 

silver 2012 005.JPG

 

Lookout Pass Ski area, Mullan Idaho 

 

IMG_0784.JPG

 

 

Big red cats  Rossland BC  6 miles across the border

 

IMG_0534.JPG

 

Silver Mt. Idaho Kellogg

 

IMG_0784.JPG

 

Ski bud Randy at Whitewater last year.

 

Randy in the Powder Whitewater BC

 

 

Some powder off Chair 3 on Northside (my tracks) Pete

 

 

My tracks backside Lookout PASS Notice the crowds.

That looks like it'd be a fun area if there were actually room for one more person. Sheesh.  At least I won't be lonely!

post #50 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

 

Ski bud Randy at Whitewater last year.

 

Randy in the Powder Whitewater BC

 

 

 

    Ha! You can spot Randy a mile away with that beard!!! biggrin.gif

 

 

     zenny

post #51 of 52

The OP has stated that the biggest stumbling block to finding a nursing job near a preferred city and ski area is being an inexperienced graduate nurse as opposed to a experienced nurse. So my suggestion is make the job search focus on the best job opportunities and not on skiing. Ski when on vacation.

 

Once the OP has a few years nursing experience in a preferred area such as pediatrics or whatever, that is the time to start looking for the prefect ski resort-nursing job.

post #52 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post


IMG_0784.JPG

 

 

Big red cats  Rossland BC  6 miles across the border


 

IMG_0784.JPG

 

Ski bud Randy at Whitewater last year.

 

Randy in the Powder Whitewater BC

 

 

Hey Pete,

 

The mountains at Rossland and Whitewater look uncannily similar, right down to the ski tracks.  They're 90 miles apart.  Amazing coincidence?  wink.gif

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