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Binding life when skis not used - Page 2

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
LOL if you want some squits and giggles, pop on over to  plastiquarian.com .


http://www.plastiquarian.com/index.php?id=7&subid=127

http://www.plastiquarian.com/index.php?id=7&subid=134

 

Are those people for real????? 

 

Very much so.    Mind you, most of them are concerned with preserving and sometimes showing things like 1950s clothing, old billiards balls, old combs and Bakelite hair pins and acetate map rules and toys and things, not sports gear.    This means they see fewer cracks than we do. 

 

FWIW gable-top container makers (think OJ and milk cartons) and solar cell mfgs. will usually have just as low an opinion of plastic durability as these guys. 


Edited by cantunamunch - 8/5/13 at 6:10am
post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

For those who do ski out of Indemnified bindings, shops CAN test them, they will FAIL visual inspection since they are not on the indemnification list but they can test them to see if they are functioning within the ranges that they should. It is up to the individual shop to do this or not, expect to pay the usual testing charge. 

 

Yes, that.  Some (not all) shops will service non-indemnified bindings.  They're more likely to do it if you are a "regular".  They'll just have you sign a waiver saying that you agree that the binding is no longer on the manufacturer's indemnified list and they can't be responsible for anything that happens to it (or you).

 

I would think most shops would at least be willing to do a release test on an old binding, as long as you mount/adjust them yourself.  But it's at the shop's discretion.

 

If you had the kit to do the testing you could easily do it yourself.  It's just that most people don't have a carefully calibrated force meter lying around, especially one configured to test a binding release at the proper angle.

 

As for the OP: I wouldn't worry at all about modern bindings that are less than 5 years old.  If they are in storage for >1 year, however, I would have them adjusted, checked, and release tested before using them again.  I like to have my bindings tested at the start of every season, but not everyone does that.

post #33 of 34

Really old schoolers don't need a kit to test their bindings.  Just click in and try twisting your leg out each way.. then try popping your heel up.  I used to set mine to the point where I could BARELY pop them off myself.  Now I go closer to what the chart says... but I still test them with my legs to be sure they do release easily enough, but not too easy.  It's a judgement call. 

post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

 

Are those people for real????? 

If you have a 1950's Les Paul or Strat with plastic pickup covers and pickguard worth well into five figures (maybe more for a 59 LP) you might be concerned with preserving plastic.

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