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Moving to Salt Lake and need equipment advice

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hey all,

 

I am moving to SLC, UT at the end of this year where I will be transferring to a job at the University of Utah. I plan on being a season pass holder to The Canyons and will try to ski at least once a week through two winter seasons. I was out there visiting friends last year and skied for the first time in 10 years. I would say by the end of the second day I regained most of my "skills" and would consider myself as an intermediate skier, as I was skiing many single diamonds at The Canyons and Deer Valley, but nothing off piste. I believe for the first season I will be skiing mostly blues and single blacks with not much off-piste, focusing on my technique while skiing with my girlfriend who is a beginner/intermediate and likely taking lessons. I hope to make good progression so that I can do some tree skiing in the second season.  I am looking for you all to give me advice for a protocol to follow to find the best boot/ski options out there. I am 5'10", 175lbs, athletic, can ski forever (thank you mountain biking).  I don't know if I should demo skis when the season starts or buy in the off-season where everything is cheapo.

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 8

I highly recommend a visit to Second Tracks Sports.  It is a high end consignment shop that has great deals on ski stuff in winter and bike stuff in summer.  they also have a demo to buy program.  (I'm not affiliated just a happy customer) there are also several ski swaps in oct. and nov.  in the area than can have good deals.  as always, a correctly fitted boot in the foundation of fun and pleasurable skiing as well as good performance.  I would recommend searching the boot fitter threads to find a good local fitter and make that the #1 priority.

 

oh, and welcome to Utah. 

 

Royal

post #3 of 8

       Try out Level Nine Sports (  WWW.levelninesports.com  ).  They have good ski equipment at great prices. My friends 

    and I go there every year to buy stuff. It will be well worth your time to see what they have.

post #4 of 8

I think a spare bedroom for visitors use would be very advantageous!    

 

I'll check with a friend as he noted several places that let ya upgrade as you improve (for a minimum price), however I'd presume if others can recommend a boot fitter ... that'd be the place to start.   While less costly skis, poles, etc can be found anywhere, a good fitter will get you started right. 

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayCantu View Post

       Try out Level Nine Sports (  WWW.levelninesports.com  ).  They have good ski equipment at great prices. My friends 

    and I go there every year to buy stuff. It will be well worth your time to see what they have.

 Plus one on Level 9.  They've got some great deals on Rossi S7's now.

 

You'll probably get some razzing about a season pass at the 'Canyons"?  It's a great place, lots of runs, but do you want to tie yourself down to just one hill?

post #6 of 8

Hmmm, 

 

Epic Pass for the canyons $689 + no blackouts and toss in the rest of Vail's Colorado/Tahoe properties too

 

The pass wars have started !!!

 

For Ski's check out the deals Starthaus has on Nordica Blems

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/120945/the-nordica-blem-sale-is-live

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tips everyone! I agree with many of the negative aspects of the Canyons and did question if it's worth getting a season pass there, but  my colleagues and friends will have the epic pass and my girlfriend enjoyed many of the easier runs there, unlike snowbird/alta which may be too difficult for her. However, I definitely plan on hitting up those mountains while I am out there and likely later in the season when The Canyons is a slush puppy. 

 

As for Deer Valley, I felt as if I paid an insane amount of money to play golf along the ocean at a beautiful/exclusive resort but the course only had par 3's, albeit some difficult ones. 

post #8 of 8

Nice analogy about Deer Valley.  I do like that place, and would ski there before hitting the Canyons or Park City.  But that's just me, and it has more to do with skiing than eating, believe it or not.

 

The slush will last alot longer at Snowbird.  Their season lasts way longer into the spring/summer than the other SLC resorts.

 

Did you get enough equipment advice?

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