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East coast carver for "advanced" skiier - Page 2

post #31 of 48
I'm probably at the same level as the OP (maybe a little less advnaced) and went with the Progressor 900's that I got a pretty good deal on earlier in the summer. I chose it based on many good reviews and recommendations from friends. I have the Bushwackers too and am setting these up as the second ski in my quiver. Northeast skiier...
post #32 of 48

I used to look for "a lot of pop" in my skis. I always had skis on the high end of the performance range. I loved how they skied for a while each day, but after a while they wore me out. I finally came to terms with the fact that you don't need a super duper multi layer metal ti ultra stiff ski to make nice "expert" turns. When I'm skiing 8 hours a day I want a ski that will let me go the duration without killing me. I started looking for a ski that is lively and responsive yet forgiving instead and now I enjoy my ski days so much more. Those skis are also cheaper than the highest end stuff. I think many people (most?) buy more ski than they actually need. It's like driving around town in an Indy car when all you really "need" is a Porsche Cayman.

post #33 of 48

Good for you if it suits you... Me, I do what I have to do to be able to do 8 hours of skiing on skis with a lot of pop because that's what I love to do!biggrin.gif

post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post

Wow all the reviews for the Speed Course ti seems be absolutely glowing, but there don't seem to be many for sale.

Well, there you have it. smile.gif
post #35 of 48

aso gear has a few speed course Ti's as well as speed cross TI's. The regular speed cross is not a bad hard snow carver either. Speed course TI is really hard to find. Good ski for sure. If you want something real cheap to carve on all day, that is a little old school (2011) level nine has Icon TT80's for under $250.00 with binding. My brother bought a pair last year for a rock ski because he also found them on the cheap and it became his main stick. Absolutely loves them on hard pack and bumps and even 6" of powder. He was using a Peak 76 for his main ski and liked the TT80 better. There are some good deals out there right now. just need to look and decide what you want to spend. Good luck.

post #36 of 48

Also look for the Rossi version of the ski also a Ti model but I don't know the Rossi model names well enough.  Basically the same ski just different names and graphics.

post #37 of 48

I concur with the TT80 recommendation if you don't want/need a full-on ski.  VERY affordable and fun carver.  I use them on the local hills here for getting maximum turns in, not very demanding, but they really hold an edge while still being forgiving.  You won't go mach schnell on them, but that's the tradeoff, though you can still definitely put some speed on them.

post #38 of 48

I have taken the TT 80 through a GS course and although it is no Speed course, for a lighter skier, (-170lbs) I could see it being used for as beer league racer. My brother is 200lbs and on a 175, he bombs around the hill quite comfortably with them. It's like an easy gs/cruiser that will make short turns as easily as GS turns. My wife is starting Masters trainig this winter for the first time and the coach also confirmed that the TT80 would be a great segway ski to use to learn race techniques before moving to a full race ski for a woman or lighter adult.

post #39 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil J View Post

I have taken the TT 80 through a GS course and although it is no Speed course, for a lighter skier, (-170lbs) I could see it being used for as beer league racer. My brother is 200lbs and on a 175, he bombs around the hill quite comfortably with them. It's like an easy gs/cruiser that will make short turns as easily as GS turns. My wife is starting Masters trainig this winter for the first time and the coach also confirmed that the TT80 would be a great segway ski to use to learn race techniques before moving to a full race ski for a woman or lighter adult.

Looked it up and it says the turn radius is 13.4m, that seems tiny for GS style turns. I think I'd be pushing it at 170lbs myself. It's a killer deal on Level 9 though. (240$ with bindings)


Edited by Nikoras - 8/7/13 at 6:17am
post #40 of 48

Agreed, the specs say it is a short turner, but I found it to be pretty good at med. radius turns as well. And yes at $240.00, it is a killer deal.Ironically this also a pretty good bump ski, if you like a narrow ski in the bumps.

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post

Looked it up and it says the turn radius is 13.4m, that seems tiny for GS style turns. 

 

Consider your own original post:

 

Quote: Nikoras

Eventually my aim is to have a two ski quiver with my blizzard bushwackers for days when the trees/bumps look enticing or we just got dumped on (or when I just want to ride a relaxed rockered ski), and then an icepick carver with plenty of camber underfoot to rip up the icy groomers ... (Mostly Stratton VT). 

....

Advanced skiier, okayish technique (I never find myself out of control but I tend to skid on the steeps) ... I'd like to play around with the turn radius given it's a carver.

Used to race very poorly in highschool.

....

I'm looking for something for an advanced skiier but not too too physically demanding. Having a lot of *pop* is good I like the feeling of being catapulted from edge to edge. Maybe a ski that is happy going astray from its natural turning radius. Something that can definitely gobble up the east coast boilerplate and hold an edge. Eyewatering speeds can be fun, but I'd put that very low on the list of priorities. I'm looking for something "fun."

 

 

Seems clear to me that what you don't have now, that you WANT to have, is a truly clean arc-to-arc carve in your aresenal of techniques. It is MUCH easier to learn this, IMHO, on a short-radius ski than on a long-radius ski. Moreover, you can make a clean long-radius arc on a short-radius ski (albeit with decreasing stability and increasing risk as you approach warp speed, but you say yourself that warp speed is "very low on the list of priorities"). Meanwhile it is difficult or impossible to make a clean short-radius arc on a long-radius ski. Instead you'll just find yourself back to skidding again. (Nothing wrong with skidding, but you already know how to do that.) At a place like Stratton, you are going to have lots of days when the density of skiers will not allow arc-to-arc GS turns, even if you are capable of making them. But you can usually find a place to lock in some short- to medium-radius carves (and pack more of them into a given run, which is good given that you need repetition at this point). To summarize, don't get too hung up over the radius of the ski, but when in doubt go shorter, assuming your needs are correctly articulated above. 

post #42 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

 

Consider your own original post:

 

 

Seems clear to me that what you don't have now, that you WANT to have, is a truly clean arc-to-arc carve in your aresenal of techniques. It is MUCH easier to learn this, IMHO, on a short-radius ski than on a long-radius ski. Moreover, you can make a clean long-radius arc on a short-radius ski (albeit with decreasing stability and increasing risk as you approach warp speed, but you say yourself that warp speed is "very low on the list of priorities"). Meanwhile it is difficult or impossible to make a clean short-radius arc on a long-radius ski. At a place like Stratton, you are going to have lots of days when the density of skiers will not allow arc-to-arc GS turns, even if you are capable of making them. But you can usually find a place to lock in some short- to medium-radius carves (and pack more of them into a given run, which is good given that you need repetition at this point). To summarize, don't get too hung up over the radius of the ski, but when in doubt go shorter, assuming your needs are correctly articulated above. 

Thanks, consider me educated.

post #43 of 48

Agreed, I find it easier to make long turns on a short radius side cut ski than short turns on a long radius ski, the exception has been my177cm speed course. It is my main stick and I take them pretty much every where except trees, because I don't want to ruin them, They will make short turns, but their side cut is more medium-big turn biased. I still feel like a 177cm is a short ski, I spent most of my adult skiing life on 203cm Kniessel white star GS and SL skiis until 2003 when I finally moved to more modern skiis.( Dynastar Intuitive 74). the problem is that there are just so many options out there, it can be quite the challenge finding what you are looking for. Good luck and demo if at all possible.Stratton is a great hill for slalom and GS cruising.

post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil J View Post

Agreed, I find it easier to make long turns on a short radius side cut ski than short turns on a long radius ski, the exception has been my177cm speed course. It is my main stick and I take them pretty much every where except trees, because I don't want to ruin them, They will make short turns, but their side cut is more medium-big turn biased. I still feel like a 177cm is a short ski, I spent most of my adult skiing life on 203cm Kniessel white star GS and SL skiis until 2003 when I finally moved to more modern skiis.( Dynastar Intuitive 74). the problem is that there are just so many options out there, it can be quite the challenge finding what you are looking for. Good luck and demo if at all possible.Stratton is a great hill for slalom and GS cruising.

Full on Dynastar '11 Speed Course is also my main ski,  Holds on anything, I just don't do bumps and trees with it for the same reason for fear of  ruining it.  I have Nordica SLR as my SL ski and while fun quickly find the limits when cruising.

 

The Speed Course while demanding and precise requiring some work actually, is less demanding when cruising fast as you are not fighting the limits of the ski.  The SLR's are extremely fun at slower speed and tight linked turns on long runs cause excessive leg burn just to keep them in their comfort zone.

 

 

Nikoras, at this point you will find four polarized groups, one pushes GS and one SL, one Race and one not Race.  Best advice ski with different people, to determine what you want to ski like and pick the skis of the skiers that most fit who you want to ski, it is likely the best fit.  BTW demo if possible. 

 

You can likely guess which group I fall into.

 

EDIT...I forgot to include our skiers from the west in this comment and the fatter skis that they like with all that deep powder but that's a whole different argument (wish we got some powder here in the east here, at least in the areas I ski) biggrin.gif


Edited by oldschoolskier - 8/8/13 at 5:05am
post #45 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Full on Dynastar '11 Speed Course is also my main ski,  Holds on anything, I just don't do bumps and trees with it for the same reason for fear of  ruining it.  I have Nordica SLR as my SL ski and while fun quickly find the limits when cruising.

 

The Speed Course while demanding and precise requiring some work actually, is less demanding when cruising fast as you are not fighting the limits of the ski.  The SLR's are extremely fun at slower speed and tight linked turns on long runs cause excessive leg burn just to keep them in their comfort zone.

 

 

Nikoras, at this point you will find four polarized groups, one pushes GS and one SL, one Race and one not Race.  Best advice ski with different people, to determine what you want to ski like and pick the skis of the skiers that most fit who you want to ski, it is likely the best fit.  BTW demo if possible. 

 

You can likely guess which group I fall into.

 

EDIT...I forgot to include our skiers from the west in this comment and the fatter skis that they like with all that deep powder but that's a whole different argument (wish we got some powder here in the east here, at least in the areas I ski) biggrin.gif

Yeah I think a demo day is going to be necessary. The Bushwackers I picked up are going to be more than enough for any "powder days" we get out east here. I'm also trying to scout out the least rocky local hiking trails to snowshoe up and ski down post blizzard.

 

 

Kinda hijacking my own thread here but I went to the local ski shop to look into getting some bindings mounted on my Bushwackers with 1 set of holes already drilled and they said, even if the same bindings were installed,  and even if the threading looked intact they would drill new holes. Wouldn't this necessitate messing with the fore/aft (unless they were marker schizo's)?

post #46 of 48

Demoing has been a weak experience for me.  They never have a good selection for my type of skiing.  And the especially never have anything in the race dept.

 

I would like to suggest a close at Stokli.  They make a fine ski.  You can talk to Mike at the Skier Shop and tell him Bernie Sanders referred you.

post #47 of 48

+3 on the short turn skis being good at long radius.  I skied on 165 WC SL ski and they made medium radius turns just fine.  13.5 turn radius.

 

Definitely what you want to work on your carving.  That said being on a real GS ski if you have an open slope and no one around, is a great thing to do to experience carving as it's easier than short turn carving.

post #48 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

Demoing has been a weak experience for me.  They never have a good selection for my type of skiing.  And the especially never have anything in the race dept.

 

I would like to suggest a close at Stokli.  They make a fine ski.  You can talk to Mike at the Skier Shop and tell him Bernie Sanders referred you.

Maybe a local shop will be willing to give some demos for a day. The Stokli's look good but looking around it looks difficult to find a reasonable price for any of them. Maybe that will change at the end of this season though? Thanks for the referal thing, I'll have to remember that come November (I'm an optimist).

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