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BCA app out for iPhone

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 19

If you can't leave your iphone behind, you don't belong in the back country.

 

BK
 

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post

If you can't leave your iphone behind, you don't belong in the back country.

 

BK
 

rolleyes.gif

post #4 of 19

I see what the DenverPost did there.    Not really fair play, their use of that particular avalanche pic.

post #5 of 19

I do like the idea of having reports / checklists / etc in an easily accessible package, but I'm always hesitant to rely on a phone battery for things like an inclinometer and compass. This probably just means that I'm officially a cranky old person now, because realistically I haven't had cold / battery issues with a phone in a good 5 years.

post #6 of 19

How long does your phone battery last in them hills?

post #7 of 19

Whether you take your phone into the backcountry or not, this has to be a good tool for planning a day of earning your turns. 

My biggest concern with relying on a phone for a hike to ski day would be lack of coverage to assist the phone's usefulness.

As for iPhone battery life, I haven't had any issues with mine since I got the iPhone4 unless the coverage is terrible enough that the phone spends all the battery life searching for a signal.  

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I don't think this is supposed to replace anything. You always need a hard copy of a map, etc. 

 

I'm surprised at the resistance ... Every list of suggested "things to pack" that I've seen in the past few years includes a cell phone and/or SPOT, etc., for backpacking, peak bagging, backcountry skiing, etc. It might not come in handy, but for a few extra ounces there is the off chance that it could save your life. 

post #9 of 19

It's all good except when people get accustomed to always using GPS and other technology suddenly have to go without it in the field.  What happens when the device fails or satellites aren't connecting after you've committed to using them as your guide.  I wouldn't recommend venturing out without a map and compass (and really knowing how to use them) even if the app makes things so much easier.

 

That said, I do keep a small one of these in my hiking/bug out bag

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

Yeah, I don't think this is supposed to replace anything. You always need a hard copy of a map, etc. 

 

I'm surprised at the resistance ... Every list of suggested "things to pack" that I've seen in the past few years includes a cell phone and/or SPOT, etc., for backpacking, peak bagging, backcountry skiing, etc. It might not come in handy, but for a few extra ounces there is the off chance that it could save your life. 

Count me in on the "surprised at the resistance" category.  

Lets face it, cell phones have become a part of our "gear", whether its to make contact with friends for the ski day, take pictures, GPS features, weather updates, or to call in case of emergency. 

 

I make no apologies for having my phone on me, but I'm not devastated if I lose it or if the battery dies. 

 

Its all about balance. 

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Count me in on the "surprised at the resistance" category.  

Lets face it, cell phones have become a part of our "gear", whether its to make contact with friends for the ski day, take pictures, GPS features, weather updates, or to call in case of emergency. 

 

I make no apologies for having my phone on me, but I'm not devastated if I lose it or if the battery dies. 

 

Its all about balance. 

 

We bring lighters (standard technology for nearly a hundred years) when we go camping, but we also still teach our kids how to survive and build fires without one.  Imagine some old school geezer giving you a dirty look, nonono2.gif "you brought a lighter?  What a cheater!"tongue.gif

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

We bring lighters (standard technology for nearly a hundred years) when we go camping, but we also still teach our kids how to survive and build fires without one.  Imagine some old school geezer giving you a dirty look, nonono2.gif "you brought a lighter?  What a cheater!"tongue.gif

0000 steel wool and a cel phone battery will start a fire with damp tinder, talk about cheating, but nothing is cheating in survival situations.

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

We bring lighters (standard technology for nearly a hundred years) when we go camping, but we also still teach our kids how to survive and build fires without one.  Imagine some old school geezer giving you a dirty look, nonono2.gif "you brought a lighter?  What a cheater!"tongue.gif

We inherited my father-in-law's Coleman stove and lantern, and for 20 years we have used them while camping. He would have been 90 this year ... and his gear is almost 60 years old. The mantles in the lantern disintegrated, and we had a hard time finding the right size to replace them (I since have found them online), but in the meantime I bought a fancy newfangled battery-powered lantern, and wow, yeah, I like that a lot more. Mainly because my parents instilled in me a deathly fear of accidentally knocking over a fueled lantern in the tent and burning down not only the tent but the entire state. 

 

On the other hand, the stove ... I need to clean it, as it didn't work well last summer, but I think we can leave that one in service. But it takes up so much space ... and now they have stoves that will charge your iPhones, too!

 

I guess even a 60-year-old Coleman is cheating compared to using fire, but we always have both at the campsite, you know? I don't see a problem with this.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

We inherited my father-in-law's Coleman stove and lantern, and for 20 years we have used them while camping. He would have been 90 this year ... and his gear is almost 60 years old. The mantles in the lantern disintegrated, and we had a hard time finding the right size to replace them (I since have found them online), but in the meantime I bought a fancy newfangled battery-powered lantern, and wow, yeah, I like that a lot more. Mainly because my parents instilled in me a deathly fear of accidentally knocking over a fueled lantern in the tent and burning down not only the tent but the entire state. 

 

On the other hand, the stove ... I need to clean it, as it didn't work well last summer, but I think we can leave that one in service. But it takes up so much space ... and now they have stoves that will charge your iPhones, too!

 

I guess even a 60-year-old Coleman is cheating compared to using fire, but we always have both at the campsite, you know? I don't see a problem with this.

I saw a demonstration of this solar, packable lantern that you might REALLY like! 

http://www.suttoncoldfieldobserver.co.uk/Luci-solar-lantern-harnesses-sun-s-power-use/story-19510913-detail/story.html

From this

 

To this 

 

 

This is an interesting hijackbiggrin.gif

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

We inherited my father-in-law's Coleman stove and lantern, and for 20 years we have used them while camping.

Ya, I have an old lantern in the shed that came with the house and shed.  I was able to find the right mantles for it but haven't been able to justify buying a whole gallon of Coleman White Gas just to play around with it and try it out.  I wish I knew someplace sold it by the quart.  Wouldn't a quart last days in a lantern?  Perhaps I should troll Craigslist and eBay for a stove.  Then buying a gallon would be more worthwhile. We have a battery lantern, some oil lamps, two propane grills, and two kerosene heaters with K1 for long term power emergencies.

 

Back on topic, don't some phones come with LED flashlights now?

 

As for in the tent, I really like light sticks.  DIY Light stick anybody?

 

post #16 of 19

I always have mine, nice to have if you need it.  Batteries last a long time if it's off.

post #17 of 19

My memory of Coleman lanterns is that the mantle shatters if you so much as look at it funny.  Of course I was ten at the time.

post #18 of 19

Great tool for in-bounds use, as well. More people carry an iphone than a beacon, and avalanches don't discriminate between in-bounds and back country.

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by lateskier2012 View Post

Great tool for in-bounds use, as well. More people carry an iphone than a beacon, and avalanches don't discriminate between in-bounds and back country.

 

The GPS coordinate forward feature is more useful inbounds for non-avalanche events IMO.   

Most of the rest of the features should have been taken care of by ski patrol.

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