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Buying skis to grow into [Australian woman]

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I'm an "intermediate" skier. I would say I'm not aggressive and I like to ski easy but I haven't paid much attention to the gear I rent.
I want an all mountain ski, good for fresh powdery days on groomed & ungroomed tracks as I usually travel to Japan or Canada to ski decent snow.
It seems the raved about skis in this category are all for advanced or really aggressive skiers, and the only "intermediate" skis are basically narrow waists and for groomed/frontside skiing. I'm booking in for private lessons from now on as I'm past the stage where group lessons and general skiing is helping me progress fast enough, I'm really aiming to put in some work to get down those blacks with my partner!

Should I be less worried about the skill label websites refer to for these skis (which differed from site to site anyway) or are there more intermediate all mountains out there?

Some skis I'm looking at are
Atomic Supreme
Armada ARVw
Élan Soul
Fischer Koa 98
K2 Missbehaved
Saloman Rockette 90
Volkl Kenja
There are other brands head, rossignol, saloman I haven't yet looked at.

I'm 5'5 175 pounds and work out with a personal trainer to get my legs up to skiing better but I'm not overly strong in the legs. When I learnt 5 years ago I had no fear, went super fast on some hard blue and easy blacks but now I'm more reserved and my partner says I ski "very stiff".
My main concern with advanced skis is they may be too stiff, but because I'm heavier than most women this might be okay?
I want to find skis that are easy to initiate and exit turns, and easy to dig the edges in, and I like short, fast turns.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks for reading my babble!

-em
post #2 of 29

I know when I bought my first pair of skis, I went with more advanced than I was really ready for (thinking I would grow into them and as a heavier skier I could handle a stiffer ski). The first few days on them there was certainly a steep learning curve and it took several lessons before I felt comfortable on them. It's a big jump to move from rentals to skis listed for advanced/experts (for example, I wouldn't recommend the Kenja as that really is a ski best left for an advanced skier).  

 

What is your ratio of skiing at your local area versus taking trips to Canada/Japan? At this stage in the game, would it make more sense to buy skis that suit your home mountain and then rent more powder oriented skis when you travel? Also, by "are easy to dig the edges in", do you mean good on ice? In which case I would steer you away from full rockered skis. 

post #3 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmalu View Post

I'm an "intermediate" skier. I would say I'm not aggressive and I like to ski easy but I haven't paid much attention to the gear I rent.
I want an all mountain ski, good for fresh powdery days on groomed & ungroomed tracks as I usually travel to Japan or Canada to ski decent snow.
It seems the raved about skis in this category are all for advanced or really aggressive skiers, and the only "intermediate" skis are basically narrow waists and for groomed/frontside skiing. I'm booking in for private lessons from now on as I'm past the stage where group lessons and general skiing is helping me progress fast enough, I'm really aiming to put in some work to get down those blacks with my partner!

Should I be less worried about the skill label websites refer to for these skis (which differed from site to site anyway) or are there more intermediate all mountains out there?

Some skis I'm looking at are
Atomic Supreme
Armada ARVw
Élan Soul
Fischer Koa 98
K2 Missbehaved
Saloman Rockette 90
Volkl Kenja
There are other brands head, rossignol, saloman I haven't yet looked at.

I'm 5'5 175 pounds and work out with a personal trainer to get my legs up to skiing better but I'm not overly strong in the legs. When I learnt 5 years ago I had no fear, went super fast on some hard blue and easy blacks but now I'm more reserved and my partner says I ski "very stiff".
My main concern with advanced skis is they may be too stiff, but because I'm heavier than most women this might be okay?
I want to find skis that are easy to initiate and exit turns, and easy to dig the edges in, and I like short, fast turns.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks for reading my babble!

-em

Welcome to EpicSki!  Good for you for taking lessons and working with a trainer.  Seems like you'll be on harder trails fairly soon.  What level gear have you been renting?  Standard or "performance" or "demo"?  Not sure what terminology is used in Australia.  Do you know what length skis you have been using?

 

I suggest you take a look at the articles about buying gear for the first time (click on Articles in menu bar):

http://www.epicski.com/atype/9/First_Run

 

It's fair to say that labels of "intermediate" vs "advanced" don't really make that much difference.  The best way to choose a ski is to try them out first for a day or at least a few runs.  Personal preference is based on a variety of factors.  Skiers of the same size and ability do not necessary like the same ski.

post #4 of 29

Hi Em,

 

First thing, may I ask how you are set for boots?  Boots are by far the most important (or perhaps 'highest priority' is a better description) piece of equipment on which you should invest your skiing dollars.  Boots first, then skis is the smart approach.

 

Now, on with the main question ...

 

Choosing an all mountain ski for Japan or Canada will involve quite different specifications compared with an all mountain ski for our local conditions here in Australia.  So, like the post from marymack above, it would be good to know if you need these skis to work on our domestic slopes, or if you're free to choose a ski purely for the northern hemisphere.  It makes a difference.

 

Thredbo has a ski demo weekend coming up on 27/28 July, with perhaps a dozen different manufacturers offering skis for you to demo.  If the predicted snow arrives over the next four or five days it will be a great way to demo as many different pairs of skis as you can squeeze into two days of skiing.  There really is nothing like a multi-manufacturer demo to sort yourself out with a pair of skis you absolutely love, and the timing is spot on for you.  On the other hand, if the predicted snow doesn't occur conditions will be horrendous, and I'd give it a miss.

 

Of the skis in your list above that I'm familiar with; the Kenjas have the stiffest tail in their class and are potentially not the best for "skiing easy" (depending on the size you choose, of course); the Rockette 90s were hugely popular on the hill at Whistler/Blackcomb earlier this year, people were raving about them and I didn't hear a bad word said about them, and the K2s are a very well-reviewed all rounder.

 

Another opportunity - Starthaus is just about to launch their 2013 Nordica blem sale.  If they're happy to ship to Australia (or perhaps if Nordica are happy for them to ship to Australia) you could work with Trekchick, Philpug and the team to select a wider all mountain ski for Japan and Canada.  Perhaps something like the Nordica Nemesis (in an appropriate size).  Or they may have something else to offer - looks like they carry the Koa 98 and the Missbehaved as well.

 

Best of luck.

post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hello,
Thank you very much for your replies!
My "home" mountain is Perisher so basically no power and just ice and mush! But we only do 2 weekends or a week here per year, we go with friends and teach them to ski, or with family so it's very casual here, but we do go on the best, snowfall weekends of the year so thankfully not too mushy for the last 3 years here. Overseas we go for 2 weeks per year, we have a big 3 weeks planned for Canada next Christmas. So it's mostly overseas. My partner is going to buy the Blizzard Cochise.
I'd rather get something suited for overseas and if it's difficult to use here I will buy a second pair suited for Australian mush covered with a nice layer of ice.
You are right in that digging in the edges is important in icy snow, and I was just thinking it's more of something I need in Australia whereas in Japan (last trip) I had no problems. As for gear, I learnt on skinny 90s skis with boots that nearly killed me (my partners family still use them - they believe in cheap CMOS trips!), so I got some basic parabolic 150cm (no idea what type) I felt they were a little short, but miles better than the 165cm skinnys, and the last couple of years I've rented performance or demo or powder. I can't remember the exact lengths, usually around 150-155cm.

As for boots, we're planning to go to a very good boot fitter and buy them here in Australia, and won't decide on bindings until we have our boots. Because I'm not too aggressive I'll be looking at a mid-range flex.

We'd love to make it to a demo w/e but not sure that's possible and it's a sad state for snowfall this year - hopefully that improves ASAP.
Thank you for the recommendation of Nordica Nemesis, I had seen these may be a good fit.

It seems in general if I'm going for all mountains for my overseas trips do most of you think the suggested types might be okay for me except volkl and other stiffer skis?
Or are there all mountains that are more intermediate?
-em
post #6 of 29

If you are planning a trip to the US per this post 

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/120977/resorts-near-chicago

 

You may just want to stop by starthaus and get both your ski and boot issues professionally handled.

 

Phil can get you set up

 

That is if your plans allow

post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
We have a few weekends booked in for this year, so we're keen to get some now but it has crossed our minds.
post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 
Where is Starthaus located?
post #9 of 29

Starthaus is located in Truckee, California, which is a handful of minutes drive north of Lake Tahoe in California.  Their Nordica "blem" sale, which has gone ahead for the last three years, lists factory skis at very (very) attractive prices for the gear you're buying.  Mind you, they also have some great prices right now for last year's Koa 98 etc. so don't be restricted to the Nordica stuff.  I'm not 100% sure if they'll deliver to Aus, mind you, but it's worth paying a reasonable shipping rate if they do.

 

OK, you're sorting yourself out for boots (good one) and it seems you're looking for a northern hemisphere type of all mountain ski.  That narrows the focus a lot.  In my opinion you're looking for a not-terribly-stiff all mountain ski between mid-to-high-80's and mid-to-high-90's (or so) with some early rise, minimal (if any) rocker in the tail and somewhere either side of 170cm depending on the ski (measurements vary depending on the manufacturer and the design).  That only narrows things down a little 'cause there are a heap of very good skis in that category.  It's been the fastest growing ski sector in the US in the past five years, and every manufacturer has a ski that fits in that space.  Sorting the wheat from the chaff is your issue.

 

Have to run right now, but I'll come back and check how the discussion is progressing.  Enjoy your weekend.

post #10 of 29

Words from a woman who initially got too-stiff skis to learn on ....

 

If you neither have the skill nor the athleticism to do squats at speed repeatedly all over the mountain, you should not get stiff skis.  You need skis that you can bend lengthwise while taking a lesson on easier terrain and going slower than you'd like.  If you end up with stiff skis for aggressive skiers (what I did, thinking I'd grow into them), you won't learn to use the ski's performance capabilities that are built into it.  You'll get good at turning the ski yourself, which is important, but not at feeling its self-turning capabilities and working with that performance as you shape your turns.  Get a ski that is stiff torsionally (so it won't lose its grip on the snow), but not so stiff longitudinally that you'll have trouble flexing it at normal speeds.  If the workers at the shop don't know the difference, go elsewhere.

 

Boots can be softened, but not stiffened.  You need to not be crushing those boots on warm days when the plastic gets soft.  If you ski often on 40 degree F days, that plastic is going to soften up.  Discuss this issue once you find a good bootfitter.


Sounds like you are seriously bitten by the bug.  Have lots of fun as you ramp up your skills, and welcome to the ski addicts' world! 

post #11 of 29

Welcome to EpicSki. 

 

I will bow to the advice of Sinbad on the conditions because I'm not familiar with snow conditions in your part of the world. 

However, I can give you some feedback on the skis you've listed and (possibly) shed some light on what they'll do for you. 

From your list, based on the description you provided of your skiing, I'd say the Salmon Rockette 90 or the Atomic Supreme, which are super stable ski with the ability to take you on piste and off piste, or the Fischer Koa (98 or 88)  which is super easy to ski and almost lest you forget that you can push it  I'd really recommend the 88 over the 98 for the purposes you're talking about.  The Volkl Kenja because of your stated height and weight.  The Kenja has metal in it and is generally loved by someone who can bend the ski and make it turn, and by those who are improving their skills and want something grippy and stable. 

 

I owuld not recommend the K2 Missedbehaved for your application mostly because it needs to be driven to be a good all mountain ski, but mostly likes to be a powder player. 

I'm not as familiar with the Elan or Armada in this particular category. 

 

Atomic Supreme 
Armada ARVw
Élan Soul
Fischer Koa 98
K2 Missbehaved  
Saloman Rockette 90
Volkl Kenja
There are other brands head, rossignol, saloman I haven't yet looked at.

post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post

In my opinion you're looking for a not-terribly-stiff all mountain ski between mid-to-high-80's and mid-to-high-90's (or so) with some early rise, minimal (if any) rocker in the tail and somewhere either side of 170cm depending on the ski (measurements vary depending on the manufacturer and the design). That only narrows things down a little 'cause there are a heap of very good skis in that category. It's been the fastest growing ski sector in the US in the past five years, and every manufacturer has a ski that fits in that space. Sorting the wheat from the chaff is your issue.

Thanks for your reply, that's right on what I'm looking for. I guess I just need to read reviews as for which ski's in this category aren't too stiff?

Thanks for the help, still looking at skis and "sorting the wheat from the chaff". There are limited brands I can ship to Aus, so that might help, or if I get excited about 1 particular ski I might just pay the crazy Aus price for it.
The Atomic Supreme seems one of the most fitting - as it's a less stiff, less advanced all mountain in their range.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmalu View Post


Thanks for your reply, that's right on what I'm looking for. I guess I just need to read reviews as for which ski's in this category aren't too stiff?

Thanks for the help, still looking at skis and "sorting the wheat from the chaff". There are limited brands I can ship to Aus, so that might help, or if I get excited about 1 particular ski I might just pay the crazy Aus price for it.
The Atomic Supreme seems one of the most fitting - as it's a less stiff, less advanced all mountain in their range.

If you have a hard time finding the Salomon Rockette 90 from 2012-13, you may look into the Atomic Elysian or Supreme.  

 

If you are interested in looking into the 2014 Salomon's then the Lux or Lumen are super nice skis.  Volkl also has a new ski coming out called the Yumi, which is really nice in this category, with a much more forgiving flex than her big sisters, the Kenja and Aura. 

 

Edit: I've tagged a bunch of those skis on the right side of this page so you can get some specs and see some reviews. 

More product pages being built for 2014 skis every day. 

post #14 of 29

Just for the record, as you've been skiing 155cm skis thus far, I think the mid-160s is about right for you, with the possible exception of twin tip and/or rockered skis (if you go in that direction) which ski a little shorter than their stated length due to the way the skis are measured.

 

Best of luck.

post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hey Trekchick,
Thanks, some of those skis are definately what I'm after.
I've been looking at the following skis, light, flexible (not too stiff) all mountain skis with waists around 90 and 50/50 range of groomed/off piste.
4FRNT Madonna (love the graphic on the 2014)
Armada ARVw
Atomic Supreme or Elysian
Blizzard Black Pearl (reviews are great for this ski, is this ok for my level?)
Elan Soul
K2 Missconduct
K2 Superbright 90
Nordica Hells Belles
Rossignol Sassy 7
Rossignol Temptation 88
Volkl Yumi

The Elysian, Black Pearls, Hells Belles & Temptation seem to suit a more advanced skier so although they have great reviews I'm not sure if they are too much ski for me.

Ones I'm most keen on are the Madonna, Atomic Supreme or Elysian, Black Pearls, K2 Superbright or Volkl Yumi.
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmalu View Post

Hey Trekchick,
Thanks, some of those skis are definately what I'm after.
I've been looking at the following skis, light, flexible (not too stiff) all mountain skis with waists around 90 and 50/50 range of groomed/off piste.
4FRNT Madonna (love the graphic on the 2014)
Armada ARVw
Atomic Supreme or Elysian
Blizzard Black Pearl (reviews are great for this ski, is this ok for my level?)
Elan Soul
K2 Missconduct
K2 Superbright 90
Nordica Hells Belles
Rossignol Sassy 7
Rossignol Temptation 88
Volkl Yumi

The Elysian, Black Pearls, Hells Belles & Temptation seem to suit a more advanced skier so although they have great reviews I'm not sure if they are too much ski for me.

Ones I'm most keen on are the Madonna, Atomic Supreme or Elysian, Black Pearls, K2 Superbright or Volkl Yumi.

Your ideas are all over the place.  

What do you want out of this ski? 

Lets re-cap so we can narrow down some good options and eliminate the skis  from your list that don't make the cut. 

 

You say you're intermediate, which can mean a lot of things....

 Can you link parallel turns?

 Are you venturing off piste?  

Are you starting to ski moguls? 

What part of the mountain are you NOT skiing that you want this ski to inspire you to ski? 

post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hey,
Thanks, I do feel a bit over the place. I'm advanced intermediate when I have done group lessons (on blue runs), however most of the time I find steep terrain a bit much and like to take it easy on greens, definitely just greens by the end of the day.
I want to be skiing steeper runs, and to ski more fluid at the moment I'm quite stiff. I ski parallel and link turns pretty well, my partner says my technical ability is good but I need confidence and probably a ski that catches edges well. Part of it may have been fitness, so I've been working out with a personal trainer for 6 months and am in much better shape so I'm looking to do harder runs, ski faster, steeper, and most of all ski off-piste and work up to more of a free skiing experience.
Thanks for your reply.
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
No moguls, my friends aren't that much into them we more venture in between the trees for fun - so that wood be more my aim. Off piste I have ventured a little but not really on the right skis, had a day in some powder with powder skis and loved it and found the skis easy to get used to.
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmalu View Post

Hey,
Thanks, I do feel a bit over the place. I'm advanced intermediate when I have done group lessons (on blue runs), however most of the time I find steep terrain a bit much and like to take it easy on greens, definitely just greens by the end of the day.
I want to be skiing steeper runs, and to ski more fluid at the moment I'm quite stiff. I ski parallel and link turns pretty well, my partner says my technical ability is good but I need confidence and probably a ski that catches edges well. Part of it may have been fitness, so I've been working out with a personal trainer for 6 months and am in much better shape so I'm looking to do harder runs, ski faster, steeper, and most of all ski off-piste and work up to more of a free skiing experience.
Thanks for your reply.

I'm afraid that with your description of what you're doing and what you want out of a ski, you probably shouldn't be looking at something with much tail rocker, if any at all. 

 

Fully cambered with narrow side of mid fat

Nordica Belle to Belle, Rossignol Experience 74 or something in that category if you're thinking fully cambered skis that will help you make turns in tight/steep situations that you're currently struggling with. 

 

Wider side of mid fat with some rocker (minimal tail rocker)

Blizzard Black Pearl(88) or Atomic Supreme(87) or Elysian(95) Volkl Yumi, for a cambered ski with rocker that still holds an edge but may inspire you to get off piste. 

 

Without rehashing your entire list from above, most of them (emphasis on most) are too wide, too rockered or too advanced and are more likely to set your skiing back instead of inspiring you to charge the steeps and venture off piste. 

 

Edit: Added another ski choice.


Edited by Trekchick - 8/2/13 at 1:24pm
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hi Trekchick,
Thanks for that, good points.
I checked out a few ski shops in Sydney, I can't seem to get a black pearl but can get one online from the us. The Yumi was available, as was the Supreme or the Saloman Lux. I've been leaning towards the Lux or Supreme (though its a twin tip). I've seen you love the black pearl, do they suit someone of my level?
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmalu View Post

Hi Trekchick,
Thanks for that, good points.
I checked out a few ski shops in Sydney, I can't seem to get a black pearl but can get one online from the us. The Yumi was available, as was the Supreme or the Saloman Lux. I've been leaning towards the Lux or Supreme (though its a twin tip). I've seen you love the black pearl, do they suit someone of my level?

If you have the Lux or Supreme available, those would be good choices. At that point, you could almost flip a quarter to decide which one.  Both are very nice skis and will be great to grow with. 

post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 
I think they will do the trick, thanks for everyone's help. Skis have come a long way since a few years ago - we have dismal snow here atm in Australia but I'm looking forward to using them on fresh snow in the US this winter!
post #23 of 29

So, hi emmalu ... here's one more opinion - in case you didn't get enough already! 

 

Given your description of your skiing level, habits, fear level, body build, fitness level, and places you like to ski usually, some food for thought would be not to worry too much about the advanced rating of many of the skis tested.  

 

I think the biggest consideration for you is that because you often get away from Perisher and go ski in Canada and Japan, where there are massive snowfalls - powder, and probably more crud than anything - you might want to get a beefier, heavier ski for powering through the crud and feeling stable and like you can trust the ski.   A softer more flexible ski may possibly make you feel quite tenuous in the crud.   

 

Little story to illustrate that:   I live and teach skiing at a little ski area in Pennsylvania.  Originally from Australia (cut teeth at Perisher and Thredbo mostly, then went to Colorado).   So, about 4 years ago I flew over to Salt Lake City and met my sister and her grown daughter straight off their flight from Sydney, for a little skiing in the Wasatch.   As we were walking through the airport to get the rental car, they were marvelling about how light their skis were to carry, while I was lumbering along with my heavy skis, almost buckling under the weight of them hanging off one shoulder while I dragged my huge Dakine bag along with the other hand.   For a wee moment I was indeed a little envious ......

 

However, out on the slopes it was another thing.  I powered through the crud and cut-up powder, feeling stable and solid as anything, while my sister and her daughter were bouncing all around complaining about their skis and losing confidence.   They rented more appropriate skis for a day and loved them.   Then they rented them for the rest of the time!   

 

Those same heavy skis of mine served me well for the next couple of years in all conditions, and it's my opinion that while you don't need to get the most advanced ski on the market, just because it's there and hot, you definitely should not go backwards in the equipment you choose.   You will always adapt to your own skis.   

 

And that happens pretty fast too ... I accidentally took my husband's skis to a PSIA clinic with me once, so I simply had the bindings adjusted to fit my boot, and I just dealt with it (those particular bindings could be adjusted easily in the shop).  For the first hour they felt terrible, but in the end I had fun on those skis and they didn't detract from my then current ability at all.  I really surprised myself.    (Boots are another matter altogether, I forgot to get my boots out of the hotel when I skiied the Tasman Glacier in NZ, so I had to rent at the little airport when I got there - it sucked ... but I enjoyed the scenery!)

 

Long post here, sorry.   Don't hold yourself back with the new skis you get.   There seems to be a ski for every occasion these days, but you can really just enjoy it all on one pair - it's much more about continuing to learn then giving yourself mileage, mileage, mileage.   Good luck with your purchase!

post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hey emjayni,
Thank you for your post!
That's definately been on my mind - to not go too light for getting through the "crud". I know it's almost the opposite snow conditions here in Australia to my trips overseas and I'm just thankful there are some decent all mountains on the market that will be great overseas and doable here in Australia.
My MIL originally suggested I get the lightest, shortest skiis because they are easy. So I borrowed hers and I found I didn't have any power on them and at high speeds they were all over the place. I agree that the skiis you use need to match what conditions you ski in and you do get use to whatever skiis you're on.
Em
post #25 of 29

The Lux, Supreme, Elysian and Black Pearl should all hold up while you make progress. 

post #26 of 29

Yes the skis need to match the conditions ... but don't take that too seriously ... you can still ski powder on non-powder skis, many do, it's just getting the technique right.   You sound like an enthusiastic learner and lessons are great, but you just need to go do it and get absolutely tons of mileage on your own, then a lesson just once in a while.  Concentrate on this and whatever skis you get will not be as much of an issue as you think it will be.  Remember, just don't short-sell yourself and get wimpy skis, because you'll seriously regret the waste of money in no time at all.  Skiing has a much more gentle learning curve (than snowboarding, for instance), so mileage is a bit more key than constant lessons or the "right" ski.

post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks, very true mileage means alot - my sister in law took the same ski class as me but she can go down any run, even if it's new and somehow handle it. She's been skiing since she was a child and I've only been at it 5 years now.
In other news, I went with the Saloman Lux - but not without standing looking at the Supreme next to them for half an hour. #decisions. Trying them out next weekend in Perisher.
post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hello all,
I finally bought the Lux after seeing both in the flesh. I thought I was going to go for the Supreme but theLux called my name, had a fatter tip and was a few cm longer.
They are fantastic!! At first I knew they were longer than usual but after a few runs I was faster and floating over all the bumps that used to require effort to ski through.
We had a very crazy weekend last weekend in Perisher, Snowy Mountains Australia. There were winds over 100km Saturday night, and the following day the whole of Threadbo was shut and only a few T-bars open at Perisher. It was mayhem but the snowfall was okay, in fact better than most days as less people got down the mountain per hour to tear it up.
The next day however was heaven! The best day I've ever experienced in Aus. Piles of read, fresh powdery snow, nearly all lifts open. I had the best time skiing on the Lux's - they were perfect for fresh crud, the edges were great at grabbing once I put down enough force and by the end of the day I wasn't tired and wish I could keep skiing for another few hours!
Thank you all so much for all your help, I love my new skiis and have already seen then inprove my skiing in 2 days (once I got used to them). Next week I'm going down again for private lessons.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmalu View Post

Hello all,
I finally bought the Lux after seeing both in the flesh. I thought I was going to go for the Supreme but theLux called my name, had a fatter tip and was a few cm longer.
They are fantastic!! At first I knew they were longer than usual but after a few runs I was faster and floating over all the bumps that used to require effort to ski through.
We had a very crazy weekend last weekend in Perisher, Snowy Mountains Australia. There were winds over 100km Saturday night, and the following day the whole of Threadbo was shut and only a few T-bars open at Perisher. It was mayhem but the snowfall was okay, in fact better than most days as less people got down the mountain per hour to tear it up.
The next day however was heaven! The best day I've ever experienced in Aus. Piles of read, fresh powdery snow, nearly all lifts open. I had the best time skiing on the Lux's - they were perfect for fresh crud, the edges were great at grabbing once I put down enough force and by the end of the day I wasn't tired and wish I could keep skiing for another few hours!
Thank you all so much for all your help, I love my new skiis and have already seen then inprove my skiing in 2 days (once I got used to them). Next week I'm going down again for private lessons.

Good for you! 

Thanks for reporting back!

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