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Upcoming: Presidetial Traverse FKT

post #1 of 22
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Stay tuned.....
post #2 of 22

popcorn.gif

post #3 of 22
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FKT explained- Fastest Know Time

Rather than a race or event FKTs are times against the clock & are largely private.... Until posted on the web!! Our route for this FKT attempt is following the Presidential Traverse in NH & the uber speedster stud's Ben Nephew's FKT as shown above.
post #4 of 22

So you are going for FKT?  Right on!!!  

 

Did a presi traverse with full packs in a day when I was young.  

 

Lots of walking on rocks.  Your feet will be ready for an ice bath after that.

post #5 of 22

umm why not just call it KOM ....... FKT just does not have the same ring.

post #6 of 22
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post #7 of 22
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Bartering for a hood ornament for rental car...
post #8 of 22
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The Dodge Dart could use horns....
post #9 of 22
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Car parked!
post #11 of 22

Are you done yet?!!?

post #12 of 22
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Tomorrow!
post #13 of 22
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Schetchy motel
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post #15 of 22
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*Philip runs SectionHiker.com & was incredible in sharing knowledge & advise. Check out his site for some great info on the White Mtns.
post #16 of 22

So you're going at it again in a few months?  Cool!

post #17 of 22

About 50 years ago, when I was in pretty good shape, a friend and I did an abbreviated traverse of the northern Presidentials on skis. This was in February or March, We left Lowe's store at daybreak, went up Lowe's Path, carrying our skis to Mt. Adams, put on our skis, skiied to Jefferson, then Clay, then Mt. Washington and then down Lion's Head, if I remember correctly, to finish up at Pinkham Notch Camp. We finished just after noon I think. As I remember it, We were hoping to get some afternoon skiing in at Wildcat but the AMC guy who'd agreed to give us a ride back to our car couldn't get away for several hours so that part of the trip was nixed. We recorded the trip in the AMC camp log. A few years ago someone who was putting a book together about skiing the northeastern mts. called to ask about the trip. I had forgotten about it entirely and it was only subsequently that the memories began coming back to me. This trip was back in the days that back country gear like climbing skins and specialized boots and skis were unavailable or at least not available to us. We used wooden skis, the shortest pairs we could find and bear trap cable bindings with the rear cable hooks unlatched and  leather alpine boots which were pretty flexible. My friend wore a pair of WWII surplus ski mountain boots.I think. We carried rucksacks with tent, stove, sleeping bags etc. Our solution to the lack of climbing skins was to wrap short lengths of clothesline around our skis. There was a stretch where we became separated in the clouds and whirling snow. Oddly enough it was hiking down through that area a few years ago on Adams V where there is a little filled in tarn that I had this odd feeling of deja vu and the vivid recollections began flooding in. It was right in that location where we had caught up with one another.  I guess the reason the whole thing had slipped out of my mind was that it seemed inconsequential at the time. I remember being peeved that we weren't able to get some real skiing in at Wildcat so I guess the trip was not a big deal. Nowadays I'm not even sure I could walk that far but, if I could, it might take me several days to do what we did then in a few hours.

 

Time flies!

post #18 of 22

This is not directly related to your upcoming run but I am becoming more aware of the amazing trail running feats that folks like yourself are doing these days. I was in an attorney's office the other day for a closing and the lawyer mentioned that his son had just done a hut to hut traverse. If I remember correctly it was a hut to hut traverse (Madison to Greenleaf I think), 58 miles in 15 hours non stop. The thought of running 58 miles in one go is amazing in itself but over these steep rock studded, root embedded eastern trails its incredible to me. I can only imagine the elevation gain and loss as he ran from Madison Spring Hut to Lakes of the Clouds to Mizpah, across Crawford Notch to Zealand Hut to Galehead to Greenleaf. That's a strenuous five day hike for most people.

 

My hat's off to you!

post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

This is not directly related to your upcoming run but I am becoming more aware of the amazing trail running feats that folks like yourself are doing these days. I was in an attorney's office the other day for a closing and the lawyer mentioned that his son had just done a hut to hut traverse. If I remember correctly it was a hut to hut traverse (Madison to Greenleaf I think), 58 miles in 15 hours non stop. The thought of running 58 miles in one go is amazing in itself but over these steep rock studded, root embedded eastern trails its incredible to me. I can only imagine the elevation gain and loss as he ran from Madison Spring Hut to Lakes of the Clouds to Mizpah, across Crawford Notch to Zealand Hut to Galehead to Greenleaf. That's a strenuous five day hike for most people.

My hat's off to you!

Many thanks, one of the things that I think is really contributing to this is the readily available improvements in maps, technical information, and gear.
When I was in college, many of our activities involved fastpacking and looking at how many miles of trail we could get in in 24 hours. I found the pack that I had the other day from college and it was during the lumbar craze when people were getting away from the big heavy backpacks and starting to move towards wider bags carried on hips.
This bag weighed a few pounds and still did not carry as well because it could.
What are my current projects is working out a bag and gear kit that will allow me to move swiftly yet safely through the fall and winter months.

What I have going on is a race vest that weighs 5 ounces yet has 4 L of storage capacity and can carry up to 52 ounces of water. In combination with the lightweight clothing of a jacket, arm warmers, legwarmers, hat and gloves, this entire set up will weigh in at less than 2 pounds we including food. The most weight will come from the water. I will also be about carry an iPhone, socks and a headlamp to help with the adventures.

There was simply no way that 20 years ago you could have all of these capabilities for safely traveling in the backcountry and GPS at your fingertips to move this quickly. The parallel that I draw with this sort of fast packing and running in the backcountry is the deployment of mountain bikes in the late 80s. This was a time where the mountain bike allowed people to travel much quicker and carry a little bit a gear into the backcountry farther than most folks it ever ventured on foot.
post #20 of 22

What tricks of physics does a pack with 52 ounces of water weigh less than 2 pounds?

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post


Many thanks, one of the things that I think is really contributing to this is the readily available improvements in maps, technical information, and gear.
When I was in college, many of our activities involved fastpacking and looking at how many miles of trail we could get in in 24 hours. I found the pack that I had the other day from college and it was during the lumbar craze when people were getting away from the big heavy backpacks and starting to move towards wider bags carried on hips.
This bag weighed a few pounds and still did not carry as well because it could.
What are my current projects is working out a bag and gear kit that will allow me to move swiftly yet safely through the fall and winter months.

What I have going on is a race vest that weighs 5 ounces yet has 4 L of storage capacity and can carry up to 52 ounces of water. In combination with the lightweight clothing of a jacket, arm warmers, legwarmers, hat and gloves, this entire set up will weigh in at less than 2 pounds we including food. The most weight will come from the water. I will also be about carry an iPhone, socks and a headlamp to help with the adventures.

There was simply no way that 20 years ago you could have all of these capabilities for safely traveling in the backcountry and GPS at your fingertips to move this quickly. The parallel that I draw with this sort of fast packing and running in the backcountry is the deployment of mountain bikes in the late 80s. This was a time where the mountain bike allowed people to travel much quicker and carry a little bit a gear into the backcountry farther than most folks it ever ventured on foot.

Actually I think I may have misunderstood. The run I mentioned above must have been all the way from Carter Notch Hut to Lonesome lake. The runner's father was specific about the 58 miles distance. I find this all amazing.

 

I think my old army rucksack with its tubular steel frame probably weighed (substantially) more empty than your entire kit. The development of ultralight gear and the whole effort to bring the weight down has been most impressive. I remember hiking in the old days with people who were carrying enormous mountains of equipment (60-70 lbs in Kelty frame packs etc). Still, I think simply running these distances on the mountain trails with or without a few pounds of gear is impressive.

post #22 of 22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post

What tricks of physics does a pack with 52 ounces of water weigh less than 2 pounds?


That's before the liquid!
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