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some canada questions - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


Though I don't doubt it is possible, I find it impressive if they can instantly pull all crimminal and court records for an individual simply based on their ID or SSN. info.  I've worked in some HR departments where criminal background checks were handled. Most searches were limited to the most recent 7 years.  If they didn't know every single county that the individual lived in they couldn't get everything. And, if it was a successful deferred adjudication it never happened from the standpoint of a criminal record check. Data interconnectedness has improved a great deal in the past 7 years since I handled part of that process, but still quite impressive.  Perhaps Duddly Do Right has a password to the NSA database?

You need a passport now. Can't remember the whole deal or the length of time from the offense, but if you do documented rehab, etc.... And deal with the paper work, you will be allowed in.
post #32 of 51
You can also apply for a pardon on your record, not sure how it works.
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


You need a passport now. Can't remember the whole deal or the length of time from the offense, but if you do documented rehab, etc.... And deal with the paper work, you will be allowed in.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

You can also apply for a pardon on your record, not sure how it works.


Hahaha.  You've probably got to fill all of it out and submit it triplicate in at least two different languages eh? 

post #34 of 51

I went into Canada in March of this year and in 2008 with2 people in my group who have had DUI's...at least one of the DUI's was from the early 90's but the other was relatively recent and the both were able to cross the border with no problems.

post #35 of 51

It's well known that they catch people at the border for crossing with a DUI on their record and they turn the persons back.  How it's done, I don't know.

 

Another way to get hassled is to begin to cross frequently.  They'll be all over you after a few times.  I play in a musical group that had a member who was coming down from the Vancouver area once weekly for our "rehearsals" which are really just music reading sessions for fun, with no money involved.  They gave her so much crap, especially on the US side, that she quit the group to save the hassle.

post #36 of 51

Worked as a Canadian Customs/Immigration officer for a few years just after University - you would be amazed at how much is known and what personal info is shared between many different agencies already.

Just go along with any questioning and be truthful. It is very likely if you are trying to conceal something it is already on the screen. I always do exactly what ever is requested when applying to enter the US.  Always remember non-nationals are asking for permission to be allowed into another country. Border officers can easily say no. Even happened to me once while in uniform.  

 

without either a work visa or the other possible documentation you can not legally work in Canada - all ski resorts know this plus they usually have more qualified applicants than jobs. Look into both time frame and possibility of securing the paper work first.

 

if you show another area's pass (except Blackcomb/Whistler) you will get a discount at Kicking Horse and Revelstoke. But often there are better deals to be had by buying tickets in advance at local establishments - check web sites -should be posted by fall -not sure if a psia membership gets you anything. 

post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post

Border officers can easily say no. Even happened to me once while in uniform.  

Now that's something, what was the excuse?
post #38 of 51

The US official didn't need one. And we didn't get to our destination.  

post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

It's well known that they catch people at the border for crossing with a DUI on their record and they turn the persons back.  How it's done, I don't know.

Another way to get hassled is to begin to cross frequently.  They'll be all over you after a few times.  I play in a musical group that had a member who was coming down from the Vancouver area once weekly for our "rehearsals" which are really just music reading sessions for fun, with no money involved.  They gave her so much crap, especially on the US side, that she quit the group to save the hassle.

Nexus pass... Problem probably solved and much time saved.
post #40 of 51

but don't tell anyone, lines are starting to get longer for those lanes as well.

If you have anything that shows up on your record you won't get past the initial screening process. If you make it to the interview and grew up in the 60s 70s or 80s,  remember you never inhaled.

post #41 of 51

To the OP, I have been on a couple of ski trips to BC over the past few years.  I have gone in heavily armed with a pocket full of pretty impressive credentials including PSIA LIII, USSCA, ISIA, letters of introduction with past & present ski industry credentials.  RCR, who owns many of the resorts are not too generous.  In 2007 at Kicking Horse (pre RCR) I was able to get a pretty deep discount after politely working my way up the ladder to the right person.  Even after spending a day cat skiing with the Fernie SS director, she was not able to offer me any discount.  When I returned to KH in 2009, I think we ended up using liftopia for a discount (RCR had taken over).  That same trip in Revelstoke I think I was able to charm the nice young lady at the SS desk for a few days but on her day off, no deal. 

 

Many years ago I applied for a summer job coaching at Whistler.  I was offered a job, but the work visa was up to me.

 

FWIW, I don't know if things have changed in the last 10 years, but skiing in the alps has always been free or next to nothing for me as long as I have pursued the right protocol & been equipped with proper credentials.

 

On to the other topic which BTW, should probably have its own thread.  When returning from Fernie to the US over the Montana border in 2007 the US customs agent asked me for my passport.  When I handed it to him he found an old photo from a Swiss skipass from years earlier that I had inadvertently left in there.  I guess that was enough to set him off & he took my keys & told me to get out of the car & have a seat inside.  After close to an hour, (after I assume they dismantled & re-assembled my car & all my gear) with no explanation he handed me my passport & coldly said "Have a nice day".  In hindsight, after listening to the video above, I guess I did the right thing by keeping my mouth shut & not asking any questions.

 

JF


Edited by 4ster - 7/17/13 at 8:14am
post #42 of 51

Quote:
Originally Posted by rollo87 View Post

I'm a foreigner, from the UK. (pimple faced Brit!!!) 

 

To be clear, Rollo, the "pimple-faced" pejorative was directed at how young (and thus how little they're willing to be paid) most of these foreign instructors are, e.g. the hordes of gap-year kids who go through the YES factory.  Going by all the posts of yours that I've read, I'm gonna assume you're a more "mature" specimen of invasive species wink.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rollo87 View Post

Currently there is no Working holiday program for US citizens.

 

Actually there kinda is (through SWAP), though it's hardly comparable to what's available to Commonwealth/Schengen citizens.  Basically you must be under 30 and have been a full-time student within the last year to qualify.

post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

I have met several instructors working at Whistler, Hemlock and Silver Star with foreign certifications (BASI, French cert, and PSIA). Level 2 certs (except for the French cert, who had to be full certified).

 

You bring up an interesting point.  I have met a few of these guys too...what's the deal?  I thought a CSIA/CASI/CSCF cert is formally required at all Canadian resorts, especially for liability insurance.  Is that not universally true?  Or are some managers at some mountains "overlooking" the lack of a Canadian cert?

post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomstriker View Post

 

You bring up an interesting point.  I have met a few of these guys too...what's the deal?  I thought a CSIA/CASI/CSCF cert is formally required at all Canadian resorts, especially for liability insurance.  Is that not universally true?  Or are some managers at some mountains "overlooking" the lack of a Canadian cert?

 

From what I understand, CSIA insurance insures the instructor personally beyond the ski school's existing insurance policies (it also insures the CSIA itself; CYA). That said, CSIA does offer an "affiliate membership" for individuals with foreign credentials which enables them take advantage of CSIA benefits (including insurance). Not sure if ski schools care, but they'd advise prior to hiring, I'm sure. 

post #45 of 51
Thread Starter 

well I'm not a pimple faced brit, local teenager, don't have a dui and i'm not on a gap-year so it sounds like i have a chance!

post #46 of 51

Employment:

 

Most ski areas will require CSIA membership, which is not the same thing as certification. Insurance is generally the stated reason.

 

I am a PSIA L3. While I am offered a substantial discount at, say, Schweitzer, I have never gotten any discount anywhere in Canada. Note that the discount, if any, offered by US ski areas may depend on your Cert level and your current employment status. It's up to the ski area.

 

Ski areas will not sponser you for a work visa. As noted in other posts, they have plenty of local/commonwealth "talent" to choose from. They don't need a US L1.

 

Despite my cert level, I entered the country as an engineer, not a ski instructor.

 

Crossing the border:

 

Be nice, answer the questions, don't lie.

 

US border agents are customs and immigration, and they are as picky as that dual designation might suggest. I prefer smaller border crossing stations. The lines are shorter. Sometimes, if you go through the same point several times per year, you might get to know a particular agent well enough to earn a friendly greeting, but they'll still check your passport on the system.

 

Many (but not all) Canadian border agents are customs only. They might subject your passport to a rigorous check, or they might just glance at it and ask if you have any guns or booze, or if you're leaving anything in Canada. Since I'm carrying British Columbia plates, it is possible they check on my vehicle before I even get to the booth. Then they already know who I am supposed to be and where I live. As a Canadian, I'm always asked what I purchased in the US.

 

If you're planning to work, you must have a work visa. If a Canadian customs agent figures out that you're entering to work, you'll be told to go away and attempt to enter at a point that also has immigration agents (if you're trying to enter at a minor entry point that has only customs agents). When I entered, I had phoned ahead to the actual point of entry I would be using to make sure I had all the necessary paperwork, including a job offer and a Human Resources Canada decision document. They were expecting me, and entry went smoothly. I was issued the necessary temporary work visa for a particular job with a particular employer right there at the border. If you're not prepared and they figure out that you want to try to get a job, they won't let you in.

 

Since I am a dual citizen now, I am always entering my own country, regardless of whether I'm headed north or south. That may help.

post #47 of 51

Sun Peaks currently has openings for ski instructors (and ski patrollers) and while i have seen lots of Aussies and some Europeans working at Canadian resorts, it is rare to find American workers at Canadian resorts.

 

I think this is due to the US having tough regulations for foreign workers and Canada reciprocates, and there are a lot of great resorts in the USA for Americans to work at, so why come to Canada for low wages and higher cost of living?

post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
I think this is due to the US having tough regulations for foreign workers and Canada reciprocates, and there are a lot of great resorts in the USA for Americans to work at, so why come to Canada for low wages and higher cost of living?

 

Having never worked in the US myself, I cannot attest to the veracity of this, but I keep hearing that instructors in the US make a lot more than in Canada, in both wages and tips.

 

Just about the only advantages that I can think of for an instructor to work in Canada (aside from terrain / snow) are the healthcare and the unemployment / disability benefits, though those are important given the rate at which skiers get injured / benched.

post #49 of 51

Comparing very little income to almost no income?

post #50 of 51

I cross regularly, and the level of inspection or hassle depends more on the particular political mood federally or agency wise at that moment.  For the most part the individuals are people doing their jobs professionally and if treated as such will actually help you through any problems.  I have run into one or two individuals that are making their own political statement and if handled properly don't seem to last long at this job.

 

It is a difficult job that they do to ensure safety and fairness, while causing minimum disruption for the rest of us and following the orders from above.

 

This applies to both sides of the border.

 

Thanks to those that do this thankless duty.

post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

 

I think this is due to the US having tough regulations for foreign workers and Canada reciprocates, and there are a lot of great resorts in the USA for Americans to work at, so why come to Canada for low wages and higher cost of living?

You tellem Dano. Plus there's the fact that Americans have a difficult time skiing the Canadian pow.......HA!!! Just kidding.

 

Fact is even the tourism numbers of Americans visiting Whistler is down.

Resort wages are low. One can do O.K. if they have built a cliental booking private lessons and such. Once establish it is hard to leave and start somewhere else.

I think Work VISA's are another barrier.

On Mount Washington Alpine Resort (Vancouver Island) I see many new faces every year. Mostly young ones. Not so many Australians anymore. More New Zealanders and British even some Scottish which are is a class of their own, Ha again!!. Not one American. Guess the American's are smarter than I thought. Don't need them poaching my lines anyway and getting into great debates about counter rotation and such!!! 

Cheersbeercheer.gif

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