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Another rental v. buying for toddler thread

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Sorry to post another thread on this discussion but I want to make sure my analysis isn't Craaaazzzy.

 

Facts:  I have two daughters (6 and almost 4).  The 6 year old has skied for past two seasons (5-9 days each season).  The 4 year old went sking last year for first time and loved it.  She skied about 4 days.  We live about 3 hours from closest ski hill in South Dakota.  We plan on skiing 5-10 days with kids this season.  The daily rental for kids is $22 per day.  Last year I purchased new 90 cm skis and 18.5 boots for 6 (5 year old last year) for $165 all in.  She will use the 90 cm skis this year again.  I have the following offer.

 

I can purchase a pair of new 80 cm and 17 boots for almost 4 year old for $145 all in.  I can purchase a pair of new 19-22 Roce boots for 6 year old for $90.  The 6 year old will stay on 90 cm.  All in for all gear, including last year will be $410. 

 

I figure the 4 year old will be set for next 3 seasons (17 boot, 18.5 boot and 19-22 boot:  80 cm and 90 cm skis)

 

I figure the 6 year old will be set for next 2/3 seasons on boot (19-22 boot) and good for 1 season on 90 cm ski.  I will need to get 100+ cm ski for her next year. 

 

I can do most waxing and what not but probably have some tuning done by ski shop.  Am I missing something or is this a no brainer?  Thanks in advance for any comments. 

post #2 of 26

I also live 3 hours away from skiing and have taken two kids through the progression.  They are now approaching ages 10 and 11.  I came across some used skis, 80 cm and 90 cm then got some really cheap used boots online for them to play around with.  I let them stomp around in the yard with them learning to put them on, take them off, fall and get back up, etc.. Those are the things that take up most of the first couple lessons for the itty bitty ones.  I wouldn't have been so keen on letting them stomp around the yard in new skis, or skis that I didn't own outright. 

 

I also took them to the resort for a couple hours of playing on the magic carpet run to give them a stress free taste of skiing.  I next put them in a couple of half day ski wee type lessons.  The boy did OK, the girl ended up in the lodge drinking hot cocoa after an hour.  She has not skied since.  I haven't pressured her at all, will welcome her when she decides to try again.. even if she chooses nonono2.gifa snowboard haha.  The boy has done a couple of private lessons but mostly just prefers to ski with me.  He only gets to go about three or four times a season, but has managed to work up to solid blue runs by the end of last season.  It took a lot longer than I thought it would for him to get that far, but my fault for not taking often enough to retain the skills.  He now has pretty good gear.

 

So, as for equipment I recommend both, a cheap used pair to play with at home and a better season rental or resort rental to use on the mountain.  Although, honestly as long as the boots fit and the bindings are safe they can use the beaters on the greens the first couple times out.  No need for really good tune.  Just make sure they don't have warm weather wax on a super cold day because the bases will ice up and quickly become unskiable.

post #3 of 26

My kids skied more and I always purchased.  The only problem with hand me downs, is adjusting/remounting the bindings. 

I eventually just started mounting demo bindings on my kids skis,  since their feet grow really fast.

post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the comments.  Great point on remounting.  I will make sure that the bindings for the skis (90 own and 80's maybe purchase) are adjustable to the length of the three boots (17, 18.5 and 19-22).  The six year old loves sking and has been walking around the house with her ski boots on multiple times this summer.  The soon to be four year old mimics her every move and tries to do the same.   Last year when we took the then 3 year old sking she had a hissy fit at the end of each day when the hill closed.  Wouldn't take her skis off after the lifts closed and forced me (I enjoyed it) to walk her up the bunny hill for one last run every day we skied.  My wife and I are keeping it fun and we look forward to the family ski experience for years to come (fingers crossed).

post #5 of 26

I was pretty lucky with the kids skis I've gotten so far.  All of the heel pieces had decent tracks for wide adjustment.  I'd stop short of calling them demo bindings though.  My kids have pretty small feet though so perhaps that is why.  We started with 16 mondo on the sub 100 cm skis and they were good up to about 21.  The 117 cm and 123 cm skis we moved up to came mounted with bindings that took the 21 mondo barely with good forward pressure.  There is plenty of room for larger boots when the need arises.

 

Just for kicks, first chair on their first powder day haha

 

post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tjhart27 View Post

Sorry to post another thread on this discussion but I want to make sure my analysis isn't Craaaazzzy.

 

Facts:  I have two daughters (6 and almost 4).  The 6 year old has skied for past two seasons (5-9 days each season).  The 4 year old went sking last year for first time and loved it.  . . . 

Welcome to EpicSki!  Always fun to hear about families getting little ones started.

 

I didn't know much about equipment back when I got my daughter started at age 4.  I took the easy way out by doing a season lease for my daughter after it was clear she would be going often enough.  It's a 4 hour drive for us to our "home" mountain.  Started buying used skis and new boots from a local bootfitter when she was about 8.  Her last two pairs of skis came from an EpicSki father.  No other kids in our case.

 

Did you find this thread in the Family Skiing section?

http://www.epicski.com/t/92869/money-time-saving-tips-for-parents-with-small-children-who-ski

post #7 of 26
Dont forget that not waiting in the rental queue in the morning and evening is worth someting.
post #8 of 26

^^^Tru DAT!  And with a very excited and impatient toddler morning, cranky and tired evening to that situation.  On the down side though, you have to schlep the gear from the parking lot, possibly via a shuttle bus if you don't rent it there at the lodge, so no solution is perfect.

post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by emil View Post

Dont forget that not waiting in the rental queue in the morning and evening is worth someting.

 wot he said. And surely you can sell the skis later on ebay or a swap meet so you get some bucks for the next set of gear. But don't encourage them unless you can afford race club, a quiver of gear - the little tacker in the pic has more Frequent Fyler miles with the Ski Patrol than I do.

*

post #10 of 26

We always skied a lot of days in a season, but I am a believer in purchasing for one reason.  You know what your kids are on and that it fits.  My first day skiing as a kid was a nightmare because of ill fitting boots.  I couldn't control my skis at all and believed the sport was just too hard.  Luckily, my adult cousin was ski patrol and he figured out the problem so that my parents bought me equipment and I tried again the next weekend.  Forty years later I love the sport.  I was always able to recoup most of my money on my son's "old" equipment.  His feet grew like crazy and I had to buy new boots every year for 6 seasons.  We became regular at ski shows.   But, every time he flies by me, leaving me in his dust, it's worth it!

post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustski View Post

But, every time he flies by me, leaving me in his dust, it's worth it!

A couple of our club's kid racers aren't allowed to beat us in the club race. It's a rule biggrin.gif

 

 

 

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post #12 of 26

Anything you can buy that both daughters will use is a no-brainer.  That said, I have not heard great things about the Roces boots.

 

As for the little one's equipment, it's simple math.  Compare the cost of purchase to the cost of season rentals.  Using skis for two seasons isn't too bad, but the boots may not cooperate in the same way.

 

It may be difficult to rent "girly" (i.e.: pink) skis and boots.  Sometimes it's worth a little extra money to buy equipment that makes the kid excited about skiing.

 

My money-saving plan went off the rails in early 2012 when my older daughter complained that her nice pink Dalbello boots weren't tight enough.  I had to scramble for some Langes in the same mondo.

post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thank you again for all comments. I pulled the trigger again on the new equipment for the girls. Even if my projections on years of use don't work out it still makes sense when you consider the other factors. In fact the gear came in yesterday and the girls are stoked and even though we are in 95 degree heat they are talking about the ski season. That to me makes the decision worth it.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tjhart27 View Post

Thank you again for all comments. I pulled the trigger again on the new equipment for the girls. Even if my projections on years of use don't work out it still makes sense when you consider the other factors.

icon14.gif

post #15 of 26

+1 to kid stoke.  Been around skiing a long long long time in many many different parts of the country.  I've experienced no greater internal joy than I get watching my kids advance and improve at things like this.  Glad you have your gear ready to go.

post #16 of 26

I love watching their excitement when the new gear arrives!  My son is 16yrs and I still love buying him gear for christmas gifts.  Last year, he took one look at the box (skis) and said I wonder what THESE are and tore into it.  Totally worth it!

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

^^^Tru DAT!  And with a very excited and impatient toddler morning, cranky and tired evening to that situation.  On the down side though, you have to schlep the gear from the parking lot, possibly via a shuttle bus if you don't rent it there at the lodge, so no solution is perfect.

Kid old enough to ski is old enough to carry their own skis and poles. 

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Kid old enough to ski is old enough to carry their own skis and poles. 


Yes they are, but I'm too old and impatient to wait for them when they are super little. A lot faster to just carry them for them...  at least until they are 6 or 7.  It really depends on how terrible the parking situation is.  If you get there early and have a great spot no worries.  The smaller the kid, the more delays we'd encounter on the three hour drive getting there.

post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


Yes they are, but I'm too old and impatient to wait for them when they are super little. A lot faster to just carry them for them...  at least until they are 6 or 7.  It really depends on how terrible the parking situation is.  If you get there early and have a great spot no worries.  The smaller the kid, the more delays we'd encounter on the three hour drive getting there.

Ah--the most important qualification for a kid's readiness to ski is the patience of their parents.

post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

^^^Tru DAT!  And with a very excited and impatient toddler morning, cranky and tired evening to that situation.  On the down side though, you have to schlep the gear from the parking lot, possibly via a shuttle bus if you don't rent it there at the lodge, so no solution is perfect.

Kid old enough to ski is old enough to carry their own skis and poles. 

I was perfectly happy that the instructors didn't recommend poles until my daughter was 6 or so.  She was willing to carry skis OR boots, but at 4 or 5 I didn't expect her to deal with both.  Luckily the walk to the parking lot is pretty short at our home mountain.  Or we would arrive early enough to park up close at other places in the southeast.  The flip side to a small hill is parking logistics aren't too bad.

post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Ah--the most important qualification for a kid's readiness to ski is the patience of their parents.


Touche'!  But it works both ways.  Now he grabs my gear and says "come on dad... HURRY UP!"

post #22 of 26

Here is a thread I started a few years ago.  I hope people keep adding to it:  http://www.epicski.com/t/92869/money-time-saving-tips-for-parents-with-small-children-who-ski

 

 

Buying good quality used equipment for kids is often times better, safer, more convenient, and less expensive than renting.  Safer and better?  When you look at the quality of some rental equipment (the stuff rented at the resorts), and consider how that equipment is abused (thrown into sleds, skied onto blacktop, not tuned, boots not sprayed, etc.), buying used is a no-brainer.  Besides, basic kids skis change very little from year-to-year except for the tops, and they don't ski on the tops.  There is nothing wrong with a seasonal rental from a good ski shop, either.  I know how to tune skis and adjust bindings (not hard on kids equipment), so buying was the best option.

 

Buying used ski jackets and pants is also a no-brainer if you are trying to save money...and is often times "free" when you sell it again on ebay or Craigslist.  You can get really inexpensive quality clothing off ebay in the off season (Obermeyer, Couloir, etc.) and then sometimes sell it for the same price.  I am amazed by how many people in warm states like Florida sell this stuff.  Obermeyer has the I-Grow feature that adds a year or two to the clothing.  Obermeyer backs their clothing, too.  Lose the little compass or a zipper pull?  Email the company and one will be in the mail within 24 hours.   Most of these manufacturers change their colors every year, but the solids never go out of style (like a 3 to 9-year old cares).  When my older son was 4 I remember buying a Couloir ski suit for less than $20 (Note: I never bought ski suits again to make bathroom breaks easier).  Anyhow, we used it the next year for our then 3-year old and eventually sold it for $20. 

 

I always went to a ski shop for boots when the kids were toddles since one kid has thin feet while the other was at the time quite wide.  When they got older both kids fit well into Lange making life easier.  Helmets?  At the time Marker made an adjustable Tracer  helmet that lasted four years per kid.  Adjustable helmets are the way to go, and beat worrying about lice from the kid who used a crappy rental helmet the day before. Poles?  Adjustable are the way to go while the kids are growing. I am surprised more ski shops don't sell adjustable kids poles (K2  and others have them), but they come up on the Internet from time-to-time discounted at Level 9 or ebay.

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Ah--the most important qualification for a kid's readiness to ski is the patience of their parents.


Touche'!  But it works both ways.  Now he grabs my gear and says "come on dad... HURRY UP!"

Just wait until he is saying "hurry up" on the slopes too! biggrin.gif  My daughter officially became better than me, at least in spurts, last April at Alta.  Her ski instructors took the Level 8 kids to Devil's Castle and taught them to do some pretty big natural jumps.  Great fun to watch her when we skied together after an unexpected powder dump.

post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

Just wait until he is saying "hurry up" on the slopes too! biggrin.gif  My daughter officially became better than me, at least in spurts, last April at Alta.  Her ski instructors took the Level 8 kids to Devil's Castle and taught them to do some pretty big natural jumps.  Great fun to watch her when we skied together after an unexpected powder dump.

They don't say hurry up. They just leave you.

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

Just wait until he is saying "hurry up" on the slopes too! biggrin.gif  My daughter officially became better than me, at least in spurts, last April at Alta.  Her ski instructors took the Level 8 kids to Devil's Castle and taught them to do some pretty big natural jumps.  Great fun to watch her when we skied together after an unexpected powder dump.

They don't say hurry up. They just leave you.

A well brought up southern boy might still wait before he's in high school. wink.gif

 

I only have a one daughter.  She is a tween and a social skier, so she waits.  Sometimes by plopping down in the powder.  That's her in blue and me in back.

 

 

post #26 of 26

I am happy to say that my 16 yr old is a gentleman.  He waits for me and .. if my diva friends are skiing with us ... he waits for them too!

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