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Information from ski companies.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Many have noted the "relative" or elastic information printed by ski companies in regards to ski dimensions.

Others have questioned the relative binding placement relative to the skis. The fore /aft debate. See: http://www.realskiers.com/ski-bindings.htm

 

Allow me to use a concrete example in regards to one ski; the coming "hot" ski from Rossignol.

 The Soul 7.

 

Have analyzed the data printed and even measured the ski. A 180 cm. model.

 

Here are the "objective" measurements coming out of my tape ( to the mm. )

 

177 cm. chord length

178 cm.  ski surface length. That is using flexible tape and following top of ski from tip to tail.

156 cm. Contact surface on flat metal work bench.

158 cm. Contact of edge when ski placed on a 45 degree angle.

156 cm. Contact of edge when placing a ski on edge at 30 degrees.

 

Here is the problem for the "technical skier" who wants to get the most performance out of a ski.

 

If you use the old rule : measure running surface and divide by 2 to get BOF placement of bindings,,,,

If you use mid boot mark alignment on ski,,,,,

If you forget old rules and "adjust" for your ski feel,,,,,,

 

Did you notice I did not end phrases?

 

Seems there is no hard fast ONE rule for binding placement on "modern" skis.

 

My advice to all. Get a demo ski with a demo binding for at least a week. Ski various terrains, various conditions and vary the placement of the binding. Note these changes. Take notes all week long and and end of week YOU decide where you want that binding to be.

 

I asked a Rossignol technical advisor from France about this issue this summer. No firm answer. No hard fast golden rule.

 

We are all on new terrain. Looking for the best performance for US. Since we ski different conditions, require different ski performance variable in one week ( powder crud  hard packed ) We must decide our own performance demands on a particular ski and particular ski conditions. On a "all terrain,,all type of snow ski"  the decision for binding placement is ever more difficult.

 

Just do not go to shop,,buy skis and allow technician to blindly follow "rules". At 156 cm. running surface  base contact ( on a 180 cm. ski  ) 5 mm. one way or another way makes a difference.

 

Just a thought.

 

All I ask is that you all think what your performance demands are most of the time on those skis .


Edited by Voila - 7/9/13 at 6:18am
post #2 of 11

Solution----

 

mount a pair of Marker "Schizo" bindings----take the adjustment key with you out on the hill and find the sweet spot.smile.gif

 

mike

post #3 of 11

So what is wrong with mounting on the line? It's there for a reason.

 

You still see people mounting modern pow shapes extremely far back because they think it will improve their performance because they are a "traditional skier" while essentially they are just fighting the design of the ski because they think they know best.

 

The designers and athletes usually come up with a mounting point that makes the most sense.
 

post #4 of 11
Quote:

Many have noted the "relative" or elastic information printed by ski companies in regards to ski dimensions.

Others have questioned the relative binding placement relative to the skis.

 

 

OP is asking the question.. should we trust the measurements made by the factory workers that laid the topsheet or should we trust our own judgment to measure the ski and make our own line in the actual correct place.  My usual answer is that unless I've done some research and seen complaints about the factory line of a particular model being totally incorrect I go on the line or very close to it.  I don't think I have anything that is more than 1cm + or -.

 

If you're getting paid to mount someone else's bindings you should always measure and check to see the line is right regardless.

post #5 of 11

I view the mounting mark, accurate or not, merely as a starting reference point - I generally mount my skis in such a way (shims/risers/adapter plates) to minimize damage when remounting. To deal with possible factory inaccuracies, a general review of skier's reviews usually points it out, unless you happen to prefer being a first-adapter. In short, There are many ways to deal with the wonderful and glorious "variety" in skis; I don't really want that  much more information (nor would I trust it that much) in a standardized format i.e. I agree with the OP - evaluate, choose your gear, and then re-evluate, changing as needed.

post #6 of 11

My widest skis have a Rossi demo binding with a movable toe piece.  As for the others, I've never hated any of them enough to justify re-drilling  to move the bindings.  I go with what others seem to like/suggest for the model then stick with it.  Gotta admit I've never been unhappy with a mount, but I do play with the demo bindings some just to mix things up.

post #7 of 11

The OP answers many of his own questions in his own post. There is a lot of variables. I will say that I have tested many pre production skis that did not have correct mounting points but here corrected by the time they did reach production. Past that of the hundreds of skis that I tested in the past couple of years, ONE ski that I didn't think the factory mount point was the best for the ski and that is pretty darn good. 

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

The OP answers many of his own questions in his own post. There is a lot of variables. I will say that I have tested many pre production skis that did not have correct mounting points but here corrected by the time they did reach production. Past that of the hundreds of skis that I tested in the past couple of years, ONE ski that I didn't think the factory mount point was the best for the ski and that is pretty darn good. 


Phil,

You may not be as "technical" a skier as the OP. After all. It looks as if he has a Realskiers.com membership.

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voila View Post

 

Seems there is no hard fast ONE rule for binding placement on "modern" skis.

Yeah, some things never change.

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Voila View Post

 

Seems there is no hard fast ONE rule for binding placement on "modern" skis.

Yeah, some things never change.

 

*still waiting for this summer's binding delta vs. binding placement thread*

post #11 of 11

just for what its worth, the rossignol mount line is created by an impression from the top lid of the mold, so it is designed into the sidecut and length.  it is not a graphic that requires alignment by factory staff with MRS.  

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