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Pet Peeves - Skiing Related - Page 14

post #391 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmypowder View Post
 


Unless your flayed out like a beach whale and groaning ,I'm not stopping. Unless your a kid.

Decent folk will stop and gather gear scattered uphill of a fallen skier, especially if the run is too steep, too icy, or too deep to climb in ski boots. I've been known to throw stuff down rather than ski down with it. I have enough trouble getting my own carcass down tough runs to do it carrying another pair of skis.

post #392 of 544

My biggest gripe is when on a powder day people get on the lift before me. Hate that!

post #393 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmypowder View Post


Unless your flayed out like a beach whale and groaning ,I'm not stopping. Unless your a kid.

 



Or a hot woman
post #394 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmypowder View Post


Unless your flayed out like a beach whale and groaning ,I'm not stopping. Unless your a kid.

 



Or a hot woman
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Yes . Lol. Though it can be hard to tell with all the ski gear on ,

Edited by Jimmypowder - 4/29/14 at 5:22am
post #395 of 544
I work nights so that I can do things in the day such as ski whenever I want. Some years ago a man from the office came by and asked me about the snow, he said he hear there had been a blizzard. I said yes and it was a big one, and that it has been the best snow of the year. Well this conversation went on for a little bit until I realized we were not talking about the same snow, he was talking about coke. I admit I played him for a minute or so until I told him I think we are talking about two different kinds of snow. I said I was a skier and that was the only snow I was interested in and that I knew nothing about anyone using coke. I think he thought he had some kind of informer, but I only get high on the snow that falls from the sky.
post #396 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

 Some years ago a man from the office came by

DEA? FBI?

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Decent folk will stop and gather gear scattered uphill of a fallen skier, especially if the run is too steep, too icy, or too deep to climb in ski boots. I've been known to throw stuff down rather than ski down with it. I have enough trouble getting my own carcass down tough runs to do it carrying another pair of skis.

 

Yep one of my peeves - had a bit of a track record in snapping heel tracks in Rossi bindings as well as my own incompetence.  If you see someone well downhill of a piece of equipment in deep snow why would you not be a good neighbour and drop it down to them rather than forcing them to bootpack painfully up the fall line? OK first lap maybe not but later in the day what do you lose - a couple of turns?

post #397 of 544
The front office at work.

I have tossed many a ski down to someone, so far i have not hit them with it.
post #398 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 

DEA? FBI?

 

Yep one of my peeves - had a bit of a track record in snapping heel tracks in Rossi bindings as well as my own incompetence.  If you see someone well downhill of a piece of equipment in deep snow why would you not be a good neighbour and drop it down to them rather than forcing them to bootpack painfully up the fall line? OK first lap maybe not but later in the day what do you lose - a couple of turns?


On a POWDER DAY???!!!?? Haha

post #399 of 544

Good Pet Peeves list

http://blog.skis.com/skiing-faux-pas/

 

I hate the bar thing....more head injuries caused when people don't let you know its coming down!

post #400 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeybski View Post
 

Good Pet Peeves list

http://blog.skis.com/skiing-faux-pas/

 

I hate the bar thing....more head injuries caused when people don't let you know its coming down!

 

If those guys are angered by people not talking on the lift or pulling the bar down without warning, then they'd better not ever ski in Europe.

 

Everyone pulls the bar down every time without saying a word, so it's up to you to avoid getting hit. Also, given that in some resorts you could easily find yourself on a 6-pack with people from 2 or 3 other countries (in addition to your own), which could cause quite a language barrier, small talk with strangers isn't all that common.

post #401 of 544

language barrier or not, someone can still make the motion to let you know they are bringing the bar down.

post #402 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeybski View Post
 

language barrier or not, someone can still make the motion to let you know they are bringing the bar down.

 

But if you pull the bar down every time, then there's no need to warn anyone. Even when I'm back in the US, I always assume the bar's coming down every time. So far, the only time I've been hit on the head was when I did it to myself (had to turn around awkwardly to reach the bar, putting myself in the bar's path).

post #403 of 544
I don't care where you are. The POLITE THING TO DO ANYWHERE is to announce you're pulling the bar down, wait for everyone to register the fact and get out of the way, then pull it down slowly. This concept shouldn't be such a big deal. The more people on the chair, the longer it's going to take to get them all attentive and out of the way.

I don't get why this is so hard for people. I use the bar. You won't get hit.
post #404 of 544

Where I ski normally, there aren't safety bars. So I guess I don't really expect them when I ski bigger places. It catches me by surprise because I don't think to look for them. I guess if I skied where there are safety bars all the time, I would be used them then and it would cease to be a problem.

post #405 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeybski View Post
 

Where I ski normally, there aren't safety bars. So I guess I don't really expect them when I ski bigger places. It catches me by surprise because I don't think to look for them. I guess if I skied where there are safety bars all the time, I would be used them then and it would cease to be a problem.


Yeah, I have encountered this.  Here in Ontario, if you don't put the bar down before the first tower and if you don't lift it just before the last tower, they warn you then revoke your ticket.  It's a liability thing.  Unless you're the cool bro-ski smoking on the lift with your other bro-ski's, the bar is down.  I personally have gotten in trouble for bringing it down on someone who wasn't expecting it in Colorado and I haven't made that mistake again.  When in Rome!  :D

post #406 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post

But if you ask before you pull the bar down every time, then there's no need to hit anyone on the head.

I'm in a post-changing mood, so I improved CB's. Much better now.
post #407 of 544

A few small changes:

 

Every skier and snowboarder knows that there are certain unspoken rules about riding, things you should and should not do. Call them skiing faux pas, pet peeves, no-no’s, social norms, or whatever you like, these guidelines are sometimes universal and other times specific to a place or person. As I asked around the Skis.com office, I realized that everyone seems to have input on this topic. So, I put together a list of some of the cultural faux pas of skiing and snowboarding.

  1.  Getting in my way when I cut hard left from the right side of the chair, or when I cut hard right from the left side of the chair, but you probably figured that out.
  2.  Wearing pants while skiing. Come on people--you're losing easy GNAR points.
  3.  Stopping.
  4.  Throwing children off the lift.
  5.  People who put the bar down on the chair.
  6.  Skiing with a group .
  7.  Talking to strangers on the chairlift.
  8.  Two people at a table in the lodge taking up 6-8 spots with all their stuff. Your helmet and gloves should not get their own seat when it’s crowded. Only your boots belong on the table.
  9.  People that get in my way
  10.  Smoking on a crowded lift/in the gondola and not sharing a hit.
post #408 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I don't care where you are. The POLITE THING TO DO ANYWHERE is to announce you're pulling the bar down, wait for everyone to register the fact and get out of the way, then pull it down slowly. This concept shouldn't be such a big deal. The more people on the chair, the longer it's going to take to get them all attentive and out of the way.

I don't get why this is so hard for people. I use the bar. You won't get hit.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


I'm in a post-changing mood, so I improved CB's. Much better now.

 

There's being polite, and there's stating the obvious. In Europe, people warning you that the safety bar is coming down would be like the lifties warning you that you need to sit down on the chair. 

 

If the bar comes down on every chair you ride every single day, warning people is fairly pointless, especially since the people you're warning will either be reaching for the bar themselves or checking if someone already has it in hand.

post #409 of 544
People on EpicSki who always tell us we should be more like Europe.
post #410 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I don't care where you are. The POLITE THING TO DO ANYWHERE is to announce you're pulling the bar down, wait for everyone to register the fact and get out of the way, then pull it down slowly. This concept shouldn't be such a big deal. The more people on the chair, the longer it's going to take to get them all attentive and out of the way.

I don't get why this is so hard for people. I use the bar. You won't get hit.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

I'm in a post-changing mood, so I improved CB's. Much better now.

 

There's being polite, and there's stating the obvious. In Europe, people warning you that the safety bar is coming down would be like the lifties warning you that you need to sit down on the chair. 

 

If the bar comes down on every chair you ride every single day, warning people is fairly pointless, especially since the people you're warning will either be reaching for the bar themselves or checking if someone already has it in hand.

 

Pick one and tell me which of these is worse in your mind: Saying "Ready for the bar?" every time, or hitting someone on the head that is tending to their children or having to adjust their gear or that isn't used to the bar because they don't have them where they're from or because they're beginners?  

 

Those are just the "obvious" scenarios.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RunSki View Post
 
People on EpicSki who always tell us we should be more like Europe.

 

Who says that?

post #411 of 544

With all this BAR DOWN talk - there is a rather easy explanation/solution - WEAR A HELMET !       Ooooop's could this start another helmet thread ?   Now there is an Epic Pet Peeve.

post #412 of 544

The only time I get hit on the head by the safety bar is when I'm wearing a helmet. Sans helmet, my head is small enough that the bar passes harmlessly every time. I'm convinced that the helmet causes the safety bar contacts, and doesn't do anything to prevent injury from safety bar contacts, because the bar would clear the bare head, but hit the helmeted one.

 

I never initiate the safety bar, but the first thing I do when I get on the chair is position my poles so they don't interfere with the footrest, in case someone else wants to use the bar, so I always get ready for the bar to come down, even before anyone announces it. If no one else wants to use the bar, we ride without it.

 

Oddly, riding a chairlift w/o a safety bar or driving on Independence Pass doesn't bother me, but flying in an airplane or riding in a glass exterior elevator freaks me out.

post #413 of 544
#8! Like some women reading a book is going to run me off a table.
post #414 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunSki View Post
 

 

I'm not saying people should be like Europeans. I'm just warning people about Europeans. They will pull the bar down every single time, usually without warning. The lack of warning is not because they're intentionally being rude but because they don't feel it's necessary, because the bar comes down every single time.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
 

 

Pick one and tell me which of these is worse in your mind: Saying "Ready for the bar?" every time, or hitting someone on the head that is tending to their children or having to adjust their gear or that isn't used to the bar because they don't have them where they're from or because they're beginners?  

 

Those are just the "obvious" scenarios.  

 

 

I'm just explaining why Europeans don't warn people. They are taught to pull the bar down when they are beginners, so everyone knows it's coming down. As such, they all tend to themselves and their children straight away. People aren't jerks about it. They pull the bar down slowly in case they don't see that someone isn't ready. But they don't warn everyone every single time because it's already expected.
 

post #415 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
 

Who says that?

In the OneWasatch/PCMR threads we've heard that for months. The lift bar discussion reminded a little bit of that.

 

As far as when I'm out skiing not much bothers me. Out of control people really bother me as they do most responsible skiers. One thing I haven't seen mentioned yet is know-it-all's on the lift. I love chatting on the lift; you meet lots of people from all around the world and usually have some interesting conversations. Then, there are those that just make you wish the lift ride was over. One guy I rode the chair with last year spent the whole ride talking about how people on rockered skis couldn't ski ( I was really wishing I had my S7's on at the time). I also rode with a guy from Chicago on a day last Spring when wet slab avalanches were going off like gangbusters. He'd been skiing in an area that morning that had been closed in the afternoon. He said he wanted to go back there and that he could just duck the rope. After I told him that was illegal and explained the avalanche danger, he proceeded to tell me how it didn't look all that dangerous to him.

post #416 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post
 

 

 

 

There's being polite, and there's stating the obvious. In Europe, people warning you that the safety bar is coming down would be like the lifties warning you that you need to sit down on the chair. 

 

If the bar comes down on every chair you ride every single day, warning people is fairly pointless, especially since the people you're warning will either be reaching for the bar themselves or checking if someone already has it in hand.

 

It's quite fun when you anticipate and block.  My last trip last season found myself wrestling with a French instructor who was trying to slam it down while we were still on the loading carpet, I'd protectvely grabbed it to defend as had an airbag pack on and wanted to ensure I was settled safely back in the seat. Words were exchanged across the two ladies he was giving a lesson too. We had reached an uneasy entente cordiale by the end of the ride

post #417 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunSki View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

Who says that?

In the OneWasatch/PCMR threads we've heard that for months. The lift bar discussion reminded a little bit of that.

Ah, of course.
post #418 of 544

It's not just habit in Europe. It's the law. And some of the chairs have bars that come down automatically. It can be challenging to get your pack off and situated and your head and poles out of the way before the bar comes down. It's a basic skill of skiing in Europe. . Blocking the bar or yelling at a local who is trying to bring it down is poor form. When in Europe do what the Europeans do(They seem to get really upset when you have your headlights on during the day in a rainstorm. Having them on is the law in California.) 

post #419 of 544
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

It's not just habit in Europe. It's the law. And some of the chairs have bars that come down automatically. It can be challenging to get your pack off and situated and your head and poles out of the way before the bar comes down. It's a basic skill of skiing in Europe. . Blocking the bar or yelling at a local who is trying to bring it down is poor form. When in Europe do what the Europeans do(They seem to get really upset when you have your headlights on during the day in a rainstorm. Having them on is the law in California.) 

Yes, and when in the US, do what the Americans do and ask first. It's not hard. But yeah, when I'm in Europe, I know it's coming down fast and hard. When that happens in the US, quite often it is a European on the chair doing it. 

post #420 of 544

"Hey... is it blinking?"

 

sp:douchcamicus maximus

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