or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Moveable Binding

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Loving the Kendo 177s. Going out West to Telluride and thinking of mounting a binding I could move back for powder. Might ski in powder twice a year. Eastern skier 95%. What are your thoughts or experience.

Thank you,

Fred

post #2 of 24

I like being able to move my boot position fore and aft on the skis.  Allows me to tailor boot position to my personal preferences on new skis (rather than mount on the recommended lines and maybe re-mount later) as well as tweak boot position for condition changes.  (I do less of the latter than I originally thought (generally one position for soft snow, and one for hard-pack...)  I've used demo bindings to accomplish this, as well as Marker Schizos.  Opinions on the Schizos are mixed, but I prefer them over the demo bindings for this.  I moved to an AT boot this year, so will probably end up buying the Marker Lord binding (to accommodate the thicker, rockered sole) and installing something along the lines of a VIST Plate to allow me to do the fore and aft moves.  Will sell you my Schizos if you want, as they won't work for my boots anymore...)

post #3 of 24

Don't worry about moving back and forth for powder. Mount a good solid binding where it should be and learn how to ski powder better. Other option is to just rent a powder ski for those deep days. 

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 
Ok, what is the din, age and price
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick2 View Post

I like being able to move my boot position fore and aft on the skis.  Allows me to tailor boot position to my personal preferences on new skis (rather than mount on the recommended lines and maybe re-mount later) as well as tweak boot position for condition changes.  (I do less of the latter than I originally thought (generally one position for soft snow, and one for hard-pack...)  I've used demo bindings to accomplish this, as well as Marker Schizos.  Opinions on the Schizos are mixed, but I prefer them over the demo bindings for this.  I moved to an AT boot this year, so will probably end up buying the Marker Lord binding (to accommodate the thicker, rockered sole) and installing something along the lines of a VIST Plate to allow me to do the fore and aft moves.  Will sell you my Schizos if you want, as they won't work for my boots anymore...)
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

Ok, what is the din, age and price

DIN is adjustable from 4 - 12.

 

Set up with 110 mm brakes.

 

I bought them new after the 10-11 season, used them approx. 25 days during the 11-12 season, and then changed boots so didn't use them at all during the 12 - 13 season.   Bindings are in great shape -- can send pix if you're interested.

 

Price is $200.

post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Don't worry about moving back and forth for powder. Mount a good solid binding where it should be and learn how to ski powder better. Other option is to just rent a powder ski for those deep days. 

 

Kind of this.

 

For what you are describing, it sounds like your money would be much better spent just taking a demo of a powder ski if you happen to encounter days deeper than what would be fun on a Kendo with limited powder experience- a dedicated powder ski will serve to make things much more fun than simply moving the binding around IF you manage to hit a big snow day (big IF there).

 

Adjustable mount bindings are aimed a lot more at park skiers rather than powder vs. hardpack.  I wouldn't consider redrilling a pair of skis and spending the cash on different bindings just to move them back 2cm in deep snow, which under the best circumstances should make for a modest difference in the way the ski handles.

 

I'm also colored by the fact that a Kendo is not a super skinny ski, and should serve well in 0-12" conditions, even with a decent skier not super used to skiing deep snow. If the snow is deep enough that you want to start fooling with your setup, you will get far better results just renting the dedicated powder ski.  

 

Yes, it snows out here, but even spending a full week on the snow, your odds are only about 1 in 3 or worse that one of those days will be 10" or more of snow.  Unless you are storm chasing and paying $$$ to book when the forecast comes in, getting lucky enough to grab big powder days on vacation is a rarity.

post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Don't worry about moving back and forth for powder. Mount a good solid binding where it should be and learn how to ski powder better. Other option is to just rent a powder ski for those deep days. 

 

 

So moving your bindings back to get your tips up means that you are incompetent enough to require lessons, but floating down the hill on powder skis somehow makes you skilled? I don't care what anyone does to enjoy the mountain, but adapting your equipment and technique to varying conditions shows a lot more skill than swapping out from an endless quiver of specialty skis.

post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoebag View Post

 

 

So moving your bindings back to get your tips up means that you are incompetent enough to require lessons, but floating down the hill on powder skis somehow makes you skilled? I don't care what anyone does to enjoy the mountain, but adapting your equipment and technique to varying conditions shows a lot more skill than swapping out from an endless quiver of specialty skis.


A powder ski is designed to float through it's overall design, not by moving bindings in a fashion that goes against it's design.

 

The same can be said for moving bindings back on a the Kendo, it won't make you ski powder better, it will just make you ski the ski badly. If you ski that tip up in pow, then yes.....you need a lesson.

post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


A powder ski is designed to float through it's overall design, not by moving bindings in a fashion that goes against it's design.

 

The same can be said for moving bindings back on a the Kendo, it won't make you ski powder better, it will just make you ski the ski badly. If you ski that tip up in pow, then yes.....you need a lesson.

 

 

The true test of a skilled skier is his ability to make his equipment work in varying conditions, even though there may be a better tool for the job. I would rather be the guy with the versatility to take his skis all over the mountain than the guy who keeps running back to the lodge to change out his skis every time the weather changes. I guess it's an old fashioned point of view that goes back to the times when we didn't have all these choices. If you need to pull out a fat pair of skis to enjoy the powder, perhaps it's you that needs the lessons? I don't mean you personally, but as a general statement to folks who rely on the variance in their quiver to make their turns for them instead of their skills.

 

Is "take a lesson" the only answer you guys can come up with? 

 

The irony of the statement to take a powder lesson or just get powder skis, shows little value between the two options. If you don't have the skills to ski powder, just get powder skis, but moving you bindings back is sacrilege?

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoebag View Post

 

The true test of a skilled skier is his ability to make his equipment work in varying conditions, even though there may be a better tool for the job. I would rather be the guy with the versatility to take his skis all over the mountain than the guy who keeps running back to the lodge to change out his skis every time the weather changes. I guess it's an old fashioned point of view that goes back to the times when we didn't have all these choices. If you need to pull out a fat pair of skis to enjoy the powder, perhaps it's you that needs the lessons? I don't mean you personally, but as a general statement to folks who rely on the variance in their quiver to make their turns for them instead of their skills.

 

Is "take a lesson" the only answer you guys can come up with? 

 

The irony of the statement to take a powder lesson or just get powder skis, shows little value between the two options. If you don't have the skills to ski powder, just get powder skis, but moving you bindings back is sacrilege?


Moving your bindings back won't make one GOOD at skiing powder. If you are tailgunning, then you are doping it wrong. Pow ski's are designed to plane, they don't naturally sit at an extreme tip up position relative to the snow.

 

If one wants to ski a skinnier ski on powder then that is fine, though they would be best served learning to ski that ski IN the powder than trying to ski backseat.

post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick2 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

Ok, what is the din, age and price

DIN is adjustable from 4 - 12.

 

Set up with 110 mm brakes.

 

I bought them new after the 10-11 season, used them approx. 25 days during the 11-12 season, and then changed boots so didn't use them at all during the 12 - 13 season.   Bindings are in great shape -- can send pix if you're interested.

 

Price is $200.

Thank you, a very good price for a $380 or so list binding. Icalled my ski shop as I am PSIA and they will sell me a new one for the same. Thanks again.

post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks Shoe bag and everyone. I cannot change to any skis as my right binding is abducted about 15 degrees to accommodate my foot which was put back together at the same angle relative to my knee after breaking it in three places on my dirtbike a few years ago. I agree with Shoe bag. I might hit 1 to 3 inches of powder and more in very rare occasion's as I only ski West around twice a year. I want to be able to move my binding back about 1cm for powder and move it about 1 degree forword for Nastar racing. Maybe after I try this I will not like it but I want the ability to change the ski because renting is not a option for me. 

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

Thanks Shoe bag and everyone. I cannot change to any skis as my right binding is abducted about 15 degrees to accommodate my foot which was put back together at the same angle relative to my knee after breaking it in three places on my dirtbike a few years ago. I agree with Shoe bag. I might hit 1 to 3 inches of powder and more in very rare occasion's as I only ski West around twice a year. I want to be able to move my binding back about 1cm for powder and move it about 1 degree forword for Nastar racing. Maybe after I try this I will not like it but I want the ability to change the ski because renting is not a option for me. 

 

That makes a lot more sense if you can't just rent a ski. 

post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

Thanks Shoe bag and everyone. I cannot change to any skis as my right binding is abducted about 15 degrees to accommodate my foot which was put back together at the same angle relative to my knee after breaking it in three places on my dirtbike a few years ago. I agree with Shoe bag. I might hit 1 to 3 inches of powder and more in very rare occasion's as I only ski West around twice a year. I want to be able to move my binding back about 1cm for powder and move it about 1 degree forword for Nastar racing. Maybe after I try this I will not like it but I want the ability to change the ski because renting is not a option for me. 


1 cm isn't going to really change the performance in powder. If you race NASTAR, and a PSIA member you would not need to make a trivial change in binding location to ski powder.

post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 

I might not need to change it at all, I just want to be able to.

post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I might hit 1 to 3 inches of powder and more in very rare occasion's as I only ski West around twice a year.

 

You're talking about wanting the ability to move the binding around to deal with 1-3" of snow?  Honestly, you're way overthinking things.  Just my $.02

post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I might not need to change it at all, I just want to be able to.

 

I don't know if they are still out there, but folks used to use powder plates and risers to adjust their binding position for varying conditions. You can even modify them to create effects like "Duck Foot" stances, alignment changes and canted bindings to compensate for permanent injuries.

post #18 of 24

There is a good article on the web about binding position, sorry don't remember the reference but it was done in Canada several years back.

 

As to adjustable binding I mounted adjustable (rental) bindings on my daughters skis (she's at that stage of growing like a weed), my wife has similar bindings on hers integral binding (rail mount) with the ski.  Yes it works to play with the for/back settings, however the binding forward pressure must be watched as the original indicators now change.

post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post
 

I might hit 1 to 3 inches of powder and more in very rare occasion's as I only ski West around twice a year.

 

You're talking about wanting the ability to move the binding around to deal with 1-3" of snow?  Honestly, you're way overthinking things.  Just my $.02

How would I know if moving the binding might dial me in unless I tried it?

post #20 of 24

mount points!  (my latest soap box)  getting them in the right place to begin with is the key, and then you need to ski the ski for what its meant to ski. Ecimmortal is correct, don't try to make race car into a ford 150.  It won't be half as much fun and not perform the way it was intended. 

 

Skiing a "powder ski" provides a fun, easy skiing experience for a true powder day. To many of us, there simply is nothing better than a powder day of over a foot. The right ski just makes it even better;  the wrong ski can just ruin it causing more work and frustration to many especially to those who aren't adept or comfortable in powder. I couldn't think of a worse combination on a powder day than taking out a ski designed to make groomed snow fun (which means characteristics that are opposite of what you want for powder skiing) and then trying to make it do something it just can't do.  

 

Add all this up and you tell me if its not worth a $50.00 demo ski rental

Travel to and from

lodging

gear your bought

souvenirs 

food

booze

Lift tickets

 

now you are not sure about the $50.00 to rent the ski for the day you dreamed about? 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Don't worry about moving back and forth for powder. Mount a good solid binding where it should be and learn how to ski powder better. Other option is to just rent a powder ski for those deep days. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 


A powder ski is designed to float through it's overall design, not by moving bindings in a fashion that goes against it's design.

 

The same can be said for moving bindings back on a the Kendo, it won't make you ski powder better, it will just make you ski the ski badly. If you ski that tip up in pow, then yes.....you need a lesson.

post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post
 

How would I know if moving the binding might dial me in unless I tried it?

Levy1,

 

The question is how does the ski feel as it is currently.  If it feels good don't mess with it.  The Canadian study I mentioned earlier said that it does change the ski characteristics somewhat...BUT....the better skiers  once they adapted to the settings found little or no change to the overall ski performance.

 

So can you make it a bit better to suit your skill (or lack thereof, no offence), Yes!  However, the biggest difference is get a better skill set.

 

Personally, for 1 to 3 inches I'll ski whatever I can get my hands on (and for that matter same goes for 1 to 3 feet).  My joy is being able to do it with anything no matter the conditions.

 

Just ski....adapt...improve.

 

Given the opportunity buy the best ski for application (you can never have to may skis), in all other situations just get out and ski, take what its all about.

post #22 of 24
1 to 3 inches is a dusting of new snow. I don't know that it qualifies a 'powder', but whatever. Solving human issues via large amounts of mechanical and technical complexity is the American way. smile.gif
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks, You asked how does it feel, Like I am on rails and can do no wrong! I have been on Volkls most of my 30 years of skiing and the Kendo is one of their best for East and Ice.

 

As far as someone saying Demo, as I mentioned earlier, My right binding is abducted (turned to the right) to match me up with my broken leg.

post #24 of 24

Funny you should say broken leg...I broke the right shin playing soccer many years ago and as a result the knee and ankle are misaligned.  No adjustments to the boots, bindings or skis to compensate.  Just the Human interface needed adjusting :D

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion